HilmirFreyr Posted 5 Mar 2013 , 9:58pm
post #1 of

Hi

 

I was wondering if you could share your knowledge and wisdom. I need to make a three tiered cake for a confirmation soon. I've never made a three tiered one, only two, and just wondering how many dowels I should use and how exactly you do it. Each tier is going to be covered with fondant and the whole cake should serve 75 people, what cake size would you use for each tier (round cake). This is french chocolate cake, so it is not as "springy" as ordinary chocolate cake :) This is what I am aiming at but instead of the bow on top it is going to be a high heeled shoe.  Any help or advice would be greatle  appreciated. :)

 

11 replies
ddaigle Posted 5 Mar 2013 , 10:11pm
post #2 of

A 6/8/10 serves 74.  That is also what was used in the picture you attached.    I have as many dowels in the cake as the size of the cake that it will be sitting on...for example...I would put dowels in the 8" cake that the 6 will be sitting on.   8 dowels in the 10" that the 8" cake will be sitting on.   That is just the way I do it.   I'm sure you will get other opinions on this.  It is a very pretty cake.  

HilmirFreyr Posted 5 Mar 2013 , 10:31pm
post #3 of

O.k. great, thanks. May I ask, I need to transport the cake after it has been put together, that shouldn't be a problem would it? This is somewhat sturdy cake I would think. Also, I have seen that sometime people but a long dowel through the hole cake after it has been put together, that is through all three cakes, is that necessary for not a higher cake then this?

ddaigle Posted 5 Mar 2013 , 11:00pm
post #4 of

I only travel fully assembled.   I also only travel with a 100% chilled (overnight) cake.   Room temperature (soft) cake is a dangerous cake to travel with.  I do insert a dowel through all tiers into the base board.   This is a false security, I know, as if I hit my breaks...nothing is stopping that cake from flying.   It is just how I was taught and what I am comfortable with.  There is a system called "SPS" you may want to read up on.   Many here use it and love it.  

CWR41 Posted 5 Mar 2013 , 11:54pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by HilmirFreyr 
just wondering how many dowels I should use and how exactly you do it.

 

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/tiered-cakes/stacked-tiered-cake-construction.cfm

Quote:
what cake size would you use for each tier

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

HilmirFreyr Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 10:00am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle 

I only travel fully assembled.   I also only travel with a 100% chilled (overnight) cake.   Room temperature (soft) cake is a dangerous cake to travel with.  I do insert a dowel through all tiers into the base board.   This is a false security, I know, as if I hit my breaks...nothing is stopping that cake from flying.   It is just how I was taught and what I am comfortable with.  There is a system called "SPS" you may want to read up on.   Many here use it and love it.  

Great, would'nt have thought about the fully chilled part, that's great idea :) Many many thanks

Roseyrod Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 12:06pm
post #7 of

I also want to add that when I place a cake in a box to transport I place a piece of rubber liner (people use it to line their cabinets they sell a roll in the dollar store) under the cakeboard and I also place a piece under the box when I put it in the car so that minimizes the shifting around in the car.  Has always worked for me.

ddaigle Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 12:22pm
post #8 of

Good pointer Rose...I also have that stuff cut into squares that I keep in my truck to place in the person's car.   I do not box my tiered cakes but I use that "skid" all the time.  

Spireite Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 2:28pm
post #9 of

I ordered some non skid sheets this week, after delivering my first tiered cake, which promptly skidded around in their cake boxes(2 hour car journey)  AFTER I had secured the boxes themselves!!!  Oh well; all part of the learning curve for me :)

HilmirFreyr Posted 15 Mar 2013 , 12:48pm

Hi, I've found the cake pans for the 6,8 and 10 inches, it looks so small, does it feed 75 people, how high should each cake then be, I plan to make

each cake by baking two cakes and combining them with buttercream :)

ddaigle Posted 15 Mar 2013 , 1:21pm

You will get 75 "wedding" slices...these are 1x2x4 pieces.  I always tell people they are getting "wedding slices" and if they cut big wedges they will not get that many servings.   After I split & fill my 2 layers...I end up with at least a 4" cake.   

HilmirFreyr Posted 15 Mar 2013 , 2:26pm

Ok. many thanks for your help

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