Lou57 Posted 28 Feb 2013 , 11:12pm
post #1 of

A question for those of you who cover cakes with ganache before applying fondant. Do you cover with buttercream before applying the fondant and after applying ganache?  What is the primary purpose of using ganache under fondant? Thank you.

26 replies
Sassyzan Posted 28 Feb 2013 , 11:19pm
post #2 of

AThe ganache is a substitute for the icing. Try it. It works greatM

Lou57 Posted 28 Feb 2013 , 11:27pm
post #3 of

Thank you! I will try it!

mcaulir Posted 28 Feb 2013 , 11:27pm
post #4 of

Just ganache - no buttercream.

 

It's easy to get a very smooth surface, and it sets firmer than buttercream, so it's a better surface to put fondant on.

Lou57 Posted 28 Feb 2013 , 11:31pm
post #5 of

Thank you so much!

ibeeflower Posted 28 Feb 2013 , 11:33pm
post #6 of

I ganached my first cake last week. It was so simple and made the cake very smooth for the fondant. My edges were also sharp too. The only buttercream I used was for the filling. 

cookielvr13 Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 12:51am
post #7 of

AI've never tried this . Sounds interesting as I try to achieve sharp edges too. Does anyone have a good recipe they are willing to share?

Thanks!

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 12:55am
post #8 of

Ganache is just equal weights heavy cream to chocolate. Some people like to add butter or corn syrup, but since you aren't pouring it, I would avoid those.

You just heat the cream, pour it over the chocolate, and gently stir or agitate the bowl until incorporated. Then let it cool to room temp :)

cookielvr13 Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 12:58am
post #9 of

AThanks

jiya11 Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 2:36pm
I use two parts of Chocolate to one part of Cream. Microwave it on 30 seconds interval. For two minutes max. Use a Hand immersion blender, cover and leave it on the counter top overnight. It will have a peanut butter consistency when ready to use.

 

Ganache really smooth well so your fondant goes smooth as well. Also, no bulging!

jess0055 Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 2:52pm

Awould you crumb coat with ganache or the ganache comes after the BC crumb coat??

jemchina Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 3:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cookielvr13 

I've never tried this . Sounds interesting as I try to achieve sharp edges too. Does anyone have a good recipe they are willing to share?

Thanks!

I tried making some ganache last night, and I followed the recipe on youtube by "Inspired by Michelle Cake Designs"  an excellent 3 part video. For white chocolate she used 3:1 ratio by weight, (the 3 being the chocolate) and for regular chocolate a 2:1 ratio of chocolate to cream. My turned out great. I'd recommend watching the videos if its your first time, she give great tips. Just search it on Youtube.

Roseyrod Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 3:52pm

@ jess0055 No BC crumb coat, just ganache.

cookielvr13 Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 4:00pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jemchina 

I tried making some ganache last night, and I followed the recipe on youtube by "Inspired by Michelle Cake Designs"  an excellent 3 part video. For white chocolate she used 3:1 ratio by weight, (the 3 being the chocolate) and for regular chocolate a 2:1 ratio of chocolate to cream. My turned out great. I'd recommend watching the videos if its your first time, she give great tips. Just search it on Youtube.

 



Thank you. I know there are different consistencies of ganache that can be made. I just wasn't 100% sure which would have worked best.

 

Thanks again!!

ibeeflower Posted 1 Mar 2013 , 8:10pm

I add a tiny bit of vanilla extract to my cream when I'm heating it. Then when it's hot enough I pour it over my chocolate in a separate bowl.I should use an immersion blender. I usually mix it by hand and it can be tiring to stir by hand until its smooth.

cookielvr13 Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 1:13am

AIdk if you do this already but I was taught to let the hot cream sit for a little while then starting from the middle and using a flat spat or whip, stir clockwise in little circles briskly outward.

The mix emulsifies a little quicker and may be a little easier on the arm.

Embles Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 2:08am

AI tried white choc ganache this week and it didnt set reakly dissapointed, ive heard white is difficult to work with and I couldnt get it to set. Next time should I up my ratios or look at a higher cocoa content white chocxxx

mcaulir Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 3:29am

To make white chocolate, use a 3:1 ratio. More if the weather is warm. You can reheat and add in more chocolate to save what you've already made.

IAmPamCakes Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 4:28am

I'm curious. For those who use ganache; is it something you always use, or do you use it by request? I'm wondering when I would use it under fondant. Does the cake flavor matter? Does it alter any flavors (that sounds dumb, but I'm wondering if I would like vanilla fondant flavor, with ganache under?)

I guess I should just try it, but I would like to know how/why you use ganache?

Cakemommy2012 Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 4:32am

Do customers miss the Buttercream taste when doing ganache and fondant mixture?? 

mcaulir Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 5:57am

I always use it. It's more traditional here than in the US. I mostly do mudcakes, which pair really well with ganache. Ganache makes a better surface to lay your fandant on and stands up better to heat and humidity.

 

I use chocolate ganache with chcolate cake, and white chocolate with any other flavour. you can flavour ganache to suit other flavoured cakes.

jemchina Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 2:03pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir 

I always use it. It's more traditional here than in the US. I mostly do mudcakes, which pair really well with ganache. Ganache makes a better surface to lay your fandant on and stands up better to heat and humidity.

 

I use chocolate ganache with chcolate cake, and white chocolate with any other flavour. you can flavour ganache to suit other flavoured cakes.

Mccaulir

 

Do you ever use only ganache without fondant, or is it just a given they both to together?

mcaulir Posted 2 Mar 2013 , 9:01pm

I have used ganache by itself. You can just smooth it, then decorate like buttercream if you want to.

ashby1983 Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 2:37pm

AI am wanting to try this today! my only question is, I did a very thin crumb coat with buttercream last night. Well this have a negative effect on covering it with a white chocolate ganache?

jemchina Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 4:49pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by ashby1983 

I am wanting to try this today! my only question is, I did a very thin crumb coat with buttercream last night. Well this have a negative effect on covering it with a white chocolate ganache?

 

I think it depends how liquid the ganache is.  If you are going to just let drip over the top, it should be OK i would think, but if you are going to spread it like buttercream, you might have a problem depending on the consistency of the ganache. I find that its a bit stiffer, epecially if the cake is cold underneath. I found it was impossible to move and spread, as it started to set up right away. (tip for next time, do not use on recently refrigerated cake)

scwright Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 5:27pm

Apeople love the taste of my buttercreams so I always do a coat of buttercream and then later go over it with a layer of either white/milk chocolate ganache so I can get a clean look to cover with fondant. I've also had success mixing my buttercream w/ganache, it taste great and gives a clean look as well but the ganache alone gives better a better edge so if you want sharp edges use ganache only as a final coating.

rockymtnbaker Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 6:31pm

I just tried this for the first time this week. OMG it is so totally cool! (can you tell I'm super excited about this?! lol...) I love how smooth it is and how easy it is to get sharp edges with the fondant. Here's a great tutorial on how to get it super smooth.

 

http://www.threelittleblackbirds.com/2012/10/simply-ganache-a-tutorial/

 

BTW, I used white chocolate, in a 3:1 ratio, with a little vanilla added. The only buttercream I used was for the filling. Here's a pic of my cake, with fondant, before any decorations were added. Please excuse the bad lighting.

 

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%