How Would You Price This Cake?

Lounge By AmyJoPearson Updated 15 Apr 2013 , 12:04am by Annabakescakes

AmyJoPearson Posted 23 Feb 2013 , 4:20pm
post #1 of 9

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This is not a cake of mine, only using it for a reference point.  A customer is asking for a similar design for a graduation cake.  It will be for viewing only, thus a dummy cake is in order :)    Not sure exactly how to price this one. I guess it's similar to a tiered cake and will be covered in fondant.  Will be a 24 inch base with smaller squares on three corners.  Any pricing ideas welcome!  Thanks in advance :)  

-Amy

8 replies
kakeladi Posted 24 Feb 2013 , 5:56am
post #2 of 9

When I made several cakes of that style I used  12" x2" layer, then the 2nd layer was cut so produce the small '3rd' tier/layer.

Most people find styro/dummy cakes harder to work on as they tend to not be stable (too light) and slide around when trying to ice them :(

You don't want to charge much cheaper than you would a real cake - for the above reason - it's harder to work on.  a 24" sq is going to be VERY! hard to cover w/fondant :(  Keep you price up there very close or the same as a real cake. 

Ducky316 Posted 11 Mar 2013 , 8:39am
post #3 of 9

Doing a dummy cake is even harder than a real cake. Your time shouldn't be less valuable because it can't be eaten.

Tata65 Posted 14 Apr 2013 , 1:40pm
post #4 of 9

AUse pipping gel on the base of the styrofoam n allow it to dry a few Hrs b 4 using. It holds goid n works like a charm.

AZCouture Posted 14 Apr 2013 , 5:09pm
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That would cost twice as much as real cake if I did. For a real one, you're just stacking squares, icing, and piping to hide the seams. But dummies? Now you're possibly carving and gluing together, and WHAT the heck does someone want something like that just for viewing? It's almost a sheetcake!

AZCouture Posted 14 Apr 2013 , 5:10pm
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Seriously people make me laugh. So they guests are standing there admiring the cake, and the mom has to tell them, it's just to look at. Cause we're gonna take it home and keep it. No wait, where would you put that. You wouldn't....what the heck?

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Apr 2013 , 9:31pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Seriously people make me laugh. So they guests are standing there admiring the cake, and the mom has to tell them, it's just to look at. Cause we're gonna take it home and keep it. No wait, where would you put that. You wouldn't....what the heck?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

That would cost twice as much as real cake if I did. For a real one, you're just stacking squares, icing, and piping to hide the seams. But dummies? Now you're possibly carving and gluing together, and WHAT the heck does someone want something like that just for viewing? It's almost a sheetcake!

I totally agree with that...I am sure the op will do a wonderful job, but c'mon, what the hell do you do with it after? Why not make a cake to serve?

AZCouture Posted 14 Apr 2013 , 9:33pm
post #8 of 9

I can almost understand big tiered cakes with sugar flowers and stuff, but this confuses me. 

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Apr 2013 , 12:04am
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

I can almost understand big tiered cakes with sugar flowers and stuff, but this confuses me. 

Especially If they had their heart set on a 6 tier cake, for whatever reason, and are only having 30 guests, I am all for a fake cake. Or maybe that Maggie Austin ruffle cake. I would only want to do that once, lol. Since it is so popular, just making a dummy a renting it out would be a good solution. But yeah, this cake as a dummy confuses me, too.

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