ladicakes Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 9:14pm
post #1 of

I'm fairly new to cake decorating. I have been making cakes with a shortening buttercream recipe. It works good because it crust perfect for fondant but I would like to start using real butter and no shortening in my buttercream I just like the flavor. But when you place it in the fridge it turns hard like butter. What's a good recipe that I can use for fondant cakes that can be refrigerated??????? Is there such a thing. Thank you!!

13 replies
mumto3madboys Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 10:43pm
post #2 of

I use half butter and half shortening as i find the consistency and taste with choice of flavouring just right for filling and spreading and eating!!! 

ladicakes Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 10:47pm
post #3 of

Ok that's a good idea. I will give it a try. Can I use crisco for my shortening? I know because of the fat reduced to the crisco recepi it's not the best shortening to use but since its only half and the other half is butter. Do you think it's ok to use crisco this way???

ladicakes Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 10:50pm
post #4 of
Ok that's a good idea. I will give it a try. Can I use crisco for my shortening? I know because of the fat reduced to the crisco recepi it's not the best shortening to use but since its only half and the other half is butter. Do you think it's ok to use crisco this way???
kakeladi Posted 22 Feb 2013 , 4:42am
post #5 of

I use Crisco all the time in my simple b'cream recipe.  It's super easy to make and tastes OOOhhhhh soooo good!  http://cakecentral.com/a/2-icing

ladicakes Posted 22 Feb 2013 , 2:23pm
post #6 of

Thanks a lot for the recepi. Ill give it a try. But still this cake canot be refrigerated right? I have a client that wants strawberries in her cake as a filling. If I do this she will want to put the leftover cake in the fridge. I guess she is going to have to thaw it out before she eats it once its been put in the fridge. 

ladicakes Posted 22 Feb 2013 , 2:24pm
post #7 of

Thanks a lot for the recepi. Ill give it a try. But still this cake canot be refrigerated right? I have a client that wants strawberries in her cake as a filling. If I do this she will want to put the leftover cake in the fridge. I guess she is going to have to thaw it out before she eats it once its been put in the fridge. 

lorieleann Posted 23 Feb 2013 , 4:22am
post #8 of

It is very common to instruct customers to allow the cake to come to room temperature before serving and eating. Because of the butter in the frosting (especially your Meringue butter creams), but also because the butter in your cake needs to soften.  Unless it is an ice cream or cheese cake, most cakes are designed to be eaten at room temperature. (Many people make the mistake that scratch cakes are 'dry' when really they are eating a cold butter cake that has not had time to allow the crumb of the cake to soften, giving it a crumbly texture.) A strawberry filling will be fine unchilled in the time it takes the buttercream to soften.

AZCouture Posted 23 Feb 2013 , 4:26am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann 

It is very common to instruct customers to allow the cake to come to room temperature before serving and eating. Because of the butter in the frosting (especially your Meringue butter creams), but also because the butter in your cake needs to soften.  Unless it is an ice cream or cheese cake, most cakes are designed to be eaten at room temperature. (Many people make the mistake that scratch cakes are 'dry' when really they are eating a cold butter cake that has not had time to allow the crumb of the cake to soften, giving it a crumbly texture.) A strawberry filling will be fine unchilled in the time it takes the buttercream to soften.

Definitely this. If I don't use ganache, I use SMBC exclusively, and it remains in the fridge unless I'm decorating it, or I'm out on delivery. I deliver no later than an hour prior to guests arriving, and if it's bigger than a small two tier, I let it sit out here for an hour or so before I take it. Big BIG ones, they will sit out for a few hours (in my air conditioned room) before delivery. It's all about timing.

AZCouture Posted 23 Feb 2013 , 4:28am

Anyone else think a slice of meringue butter cream iced/filled cake is delicious straight out of the fridge? I've grown to love it. I would not expect clients to necessarily appreciate it, but they can make that decision for themselves if they fridge the leftovers and sneak a bite from the fridge.icon_biggrin.gif

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 23 Feb 2013 , 4:45am
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Anyone else think a slice of meringue butter cream iced/filled cake is delicious straight out of the fridge? I've grown to love it. I would not expect clients to necessarily appreciate it, but they can make that decision for themselves if they fridge the leftovers and sneak a bite from the fridge.icon_biggrin.gif


Forget the cake, I just eat the butter cream straight out of the fridge... it's like a weird ice cream/fudge/frosting treat, and I can call it 'taste testing', so it's totally justified.

AZCouture Posted 23 Feb 2013 , 4:56am

Yep!

AlyT Posted 23 Feb 2013 , 4:20pm

AYou can always get butter flavoring to make it tast more like butter.

ladicakes Posted 26 Feb 2013 , 9:44pm

thanks for the help. i did advice my customer to take the cake out the fridge one hour before Thanks for that.

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