Icing Disasters, How Do I Fix?

Decorating By Sweet B Updated 21 Feb 2013 , 6:28am by enga

Sweet B Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 8:46pm
post #1 of 9

Hey guys. I have had a lot of icing problems lately. My first question is why and how do I stop the ring that forms between the layers and shows through the outside of the cake? I have made the layers the same size and it still continues to happen. Also, my icing has been "cracking" it happens mostly when I put the 2nd tier on top and happens every time to my sheet cakes. Please help! 

 

-Blair

8 replies
LizzieAylett Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 9:05pm
post #2 of 9

Hi,

 

Regarding your first question, this often happens when you either have too much filling, no dam, or air in the filling.

 

To prevent this from happening again, mix up a slightly stiffer amount of buttercream ( you won't need much) and pipe a ring around the edge of the top of the layer.  Leave a little gap between the edge of the piping and the edge of the cake, so it has room to squish out a bit.  Then fill the gap in the middle with your filling of choice, making sure that it isn't overflowing over the top of your ring, or "dam".  Place the next layer on top and leave to set up for a bit, preferably with a weight placed evenly on the top so that it replicates the weight of the icing that you will place on the cake, and pushes any air out.

 

Some people say that you should always fill with an unfrozen cake, as when a cake defrosts any air inside will expand and push out the middle.

 

 

With regards to your second question, what kind of icing are you using?  Do you place any supports under the second tier?

 

Hope this helps :-)

enga Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 9:12pm
post #3 of 9

Hi Sweet B, I have had that problem before, so I always make a damn of icing using a pastry bag with just a coupler in it then after I add all the layers I go around each layer again and smooth the side with a crumb coat and chill it for a bit.

 

I have had cakes that were so delicate that they fell apart after trimming them, and I have to make my" Spackle", as I call it which is just smashed up cake trimmings mixed with icing to fill in holes and gaps and smooth it out and let it chill for a while also.

 

Sometimes stacking a cake is like stacking  bricks in masonry work,lol.

 

For the support, I make sure that my dowels are all even with a height that is just below the icing layer so it not just sitting on the first tier with gaps but doesn't allow to much pressure on the tier below it.

LizzieAylett Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 10:11pm
post #4 of 9

Enga, although it can be frustrating to fill a cake, and might make you want to swear sometimes, it's a "dam", as in the structure to hold back a flood, not the other homophone! :-)  Thanks for the (unintended) giggle!
 

enga Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 10:27pm
post #5 of 9

icon_razz.gif  I am so sorry, please excuse my mistake, that's so embarrassing. had a good laugh though.
 

Sweet B Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 4:33am
post #6 of 9

I typically don't use any fillings, just butter cream. Ill definitely have to start trying that. I use the homemade wilton recipe. I would like to try something new, just afraid because I want something that goes on very smoothly and shows no air bubbles. Any suggestions? Thank you all for the wonderful answers, I have made plenty of cakes but never went to school so I' am wanting to better my self and my techniques as a baker (:

Annabakescakes Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 4:55am
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet B 

I typically don't use any fillings, just butter cream. Ill definitely have to start trying that. I use the homemade wilton recipe. I would like to try something new, just afraid because I want something that goes on very smoothly and shows no air bubbles. Any suggestions? Thank you all for the wonderful answers, I have made plenty of cakes but never went to school so I' am wanting to better my self and my techniques as a baker (:

If you would like to branch out with your icing, but are too afraid to try something too different, try replacing half the shortening with butter. It is SO much better! Omit the butter flavor, and use real vanilla, if you don't mind an ivory icing.

sweetinspired Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 5:36am
post #8 of 9

AI replaced half of shortening amount for butter and I also use stiffed powdered sugar. It works for me.

enga Posted 21 Feb 2013 , 6:28am
post #9 of 9

I really love Swiss butter cream icing, it is so smooth and light, but it does not hold up in extreme weather.  There is this recipe from Woodland Bakery in New Jersey that is to die for.  They have this you tube video for it that calls for shortening to make it more stable.  You should give it a try, you won't be disappointed. I'll give you the recipe.

 

Fresh Large Egg Whites 6 Large
White Sugar 12oz (1 1/2 cups)

Confectioners Sugar 8oz (2cups)

Shortening 6oz (3/4 cup)
Butter 1lb (2cups)

Vanilla Extract 1T
**I forgot to add the vanilla extract in the video. You simply add it last.

***THIS RECIPE CAN BE STORED 4 days room temp, 2 weeks fridge, 2 months freezer

**its fine to store it in the fridge/freeze, but just know that you will now have to bring it back to room temperature. Take it out HOURS before you need it, and let it get to room temp, then you will put it back on the mixer and with the PADDLE attachment on low- medium and let it mix, it will look as if it is BROKEN, and curdled, don't be alarmed this is NATURAL, it will come back together eventually, you can turn the speed up to med-high and it will mix out smooth

 

If you go on you tube and  put crumb boss in the search menu and then scroll down to Swiss butter cream recipe, she will walk you through it.

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