Satin Ice Fondant Is Cracking

Decorating By MissCuteCupcakes Updated 12 Sep 2015 , 2:10am by JWinslow

BatterUpCake Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 3:10am
post #31 of 58

good to know Alaska....I wasn't sure if it was only good for the specific bags sold for it. I was wondering how it would freezing cakes or cupcakes.g

 

JWinslow..Black Satin Ice is $9.99/2lbs now on GSA. Not sure about shipping

MBalaska Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 6:49am
post #32 of 58

Chilled Cheese Cakes only, and no sucking.  Just slip them in the bag and seal.  Done  it several times.

ivenusca Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 2:50pm
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Try to knead in a little bit of corn syrup into your fondant - it may help with pliability and will prevent it from drying.

howsweet Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 5:43pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JWinslow 


I thought it was just me.  I thought the Satin Ice seemed softer than what I remembered.  I'm going to be using it again this month (black).  Here's hoping this one comes out better than the last...

 

Good luck!
 
And to those of y'all paying so much for Satin Ice - consider getting  a tax exempt certificate and buy it from a regular supplier if there's one in your area. I pay about $65 for a 20 lb bucket, which is $3.25 per lb.
pipesqueak Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 8:57pm
post #35 of 58

AJust a response to Leah_s, cakes most certainly do create air bubbles, or gas as I called it if you seal a very cold cake. Basic chemistry, as it warms it releases air. If that air is sealed in by fondant it creates the large air bubbles. Not only have I had it happen but some of the most successful and award winning craftsy instructors have told their students that this happens. I think I will listen to them.

Your entire post sounds just a bit snarky. There are many ways to do things and there are people who know things and have had experiences that you haven't. Also, just because someone ID on this website says they are a newbie it only means they are new to this website. They may very well have a lot more experience and knowledge than you think. I thing you sounded very rude and dismissive and it is rather insulting

howsweet Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 5:28pm
post #36 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by pipesqueak 

Just a response to Leah_s, cakes most certainly do create air bubbles, or gas as I called it if you seal a very cold cake. Basic chemistry, as it warms it releases air. If that air is sealed in by fondant it creates the large air bubbles. Not only have I had it happen but some of the most successful and award winning craftsy instructors have told their students that this happens. I think I will listen to them.

Your entire post sounds just a bit snarky. There are many ways to do things and there are people who know things and have had experiences that you haven't. Also, just because someone ID on this website says they are a newbie it only means they are new to this website. They may very well have a lot more experience and knowledge than you think. I thing you sounded very rude and dismissive and it is rather insulting


This is a forum for sharing information. If a person has to sugarcoat everything he/she says and always take care to word everything in such a way as to not offend even the most sensitive person, it's going to be a lot harder to communicate. I, for one, don't want to have to try and figure out if a person is saying what he/she really means or if I need to assume that I have to read between the lines and interpret her innuendo. On this forum, I find so many people are so used to communicating indirectly, that when someone literally says what they literally mean, it get's understood by some to mean something snarky, when all they are doing is trying to share.

 

If you already know something, the info may still be helpful to someone who doesn't.And even if I disagree with the way someone does something, that doesn't mean I'm not interested and can't learn something by a detailed description of what works for them.

 

As far as the cake gas issue - I have no idea whether cakes "make" gas, but gas is released and Leah definitely addressed that. I would say that temperature is a factor as heat speeds up the movement of gas molecules and vice versa.  In my opinion, the issue can be the speed of gas release. In my very hot kitchen, I do have air bubble issues on a cold cake and that's a situation where the cake warms up very fast.  But I find that if the cake has time to warm up more slowly by placing it in a cooler area, the fondant has time to harden and becomes strong enough to hold the gas in. I also find that what Leah says about sealing in the base is helpful -- I try to let my cakes sit before adding the bottom trim and that definitely helps.

howsweet Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 5:30pm
post #37 of 58

Oh, and I didn't find Leah's posts snarky at all.

JWinslow Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 8:36pm
post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by pipesqueak 

Just a response to Leah_s, cakes most certainly do create air bubbles, or gas as I called it if you seal a very cold cake. Basic chemistry, as it warms it releases air. If that air is sealed in by fondant it creates the large air bubbles. Not only have I had it happen but some of the most successful and award winning craftsy instructors have told their students that this happens. I think I will listen to them.

Your entire post sounds just a bit snarky. There are many ways to do things and there are people who know things and have had experiences that you haven't. Also, just because someone ID on this website says they are a newbie it only means they are new to this website. They may very well have a lot more experience and knowledge than you think. I thing you sounded very rude and dismissive and it is rather insulting


So I went back and re-read Leah's post.  I really didn't find anything snarky or rude about it.  It is direct, to the point (many of us like that), and talks about what she does.  As far as Gas vs air bubbles, I believe it's just a matter of accuracy.  Cakes do trap air (which Leah addressed) and she was just trying to show you what she does.  Nothing dismissive there. 

Sometimes,  because you cant hear how someone is stating something it can be misconstrued and interpreted incorrectly.  You see it in business emails all the time.  Leah has a wealth of information she shares freely.  I for one appreciate it.

waggs Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 9:03pm
post #39 of 58

ALeah's response was fine. Nothing snarky or rude. I use satin ice all the time and never had a problem.

Annabakescakes Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 12:08am
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I don't have a problem with what Leah said, either. I do have a problem when people aren't active members of the community and then get on here and try to police the members who are.

MBalaska Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 7:00pm
post #41 of 58

About Us  

By: Jackie

Posted 10/29/12

CakeCentral.com is the world's largest social network for cake decorators or anyone interested in cake!

 

Quote:

 

Originally Posted by howsweet 

This is a forum for sharing information.................   when someone literally says what they literally mean, it get's understood by some to mean something snarky, when all they are doing is trying to share.

 

If you already know something, the info may still be helpful to someone who doesn't. And even if I disagree with the way someone does something, that doesn't mean I'm not interested and can't learn something by a detailed description of what works for them.

Howsweet, Thanks for your level-headedness & poise in bringing the thread back to the topic.

This thread on "Satin Ice Fondant is Cracking" is very informative, thousands of people have read it. You must have some insight on the value of eyes-and-ears-open, as your cakes are spectacular.

AZCouture Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 7:25pm
post #42 of 58

A

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

I don't have a problem with what Leah said, either. I do have a problem when people aren't active members of the community and then get on here and try to police the members who are.

Ditto.

SystemMod1 Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 10:18pm
post #43 of 58

Rude is defined as:  Offensively impolite or ill-mannered.

 

It is not a blanket word to call someone just because.    

 

Move on please or the thread gets locked/deleted.

 

Comments I find off topic are being deleted.

Cupcakebaker94 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 5:04am
post #44 of 58

We've used Satin Ice for two cupcake orders now, and have not had a problem at all with it. When we open a new box, the leftover fondant we seal in a Ziploc bag, very tightly.

(It also tastes better than the Wilton fondant!) Fortunately, our supplier is only about a mile from our house, which is very handy.

howsweet Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 5:37pm
post #45 of 58

Update: It turned out my last 3 buckets of Satin Ice were a bad batch - I wonder if I'm going to be getting any money back on this. It was batch number 3062004, in case anyone out there had the same problem.

Theodor Posted 1 Feb 2014 , 3:53pm
post #46 of 58

I had the exact same problem , i needed a bright orange color and i did not have time to knead it that deep, so i changed my regular brand and got a satin ice tub , was very happy with the results until in the morning the cake was all cracks although i kneaded it well . 

mattyeatscakes Posted 1 Feb 2014 , 5:19pm
post #47 of 58

AWow

Original message sent by leah_s

I've used Satin Ice for years, and just do not have all the problems that others report. 1.  You do have to knead it until it warms up and becomes elastic.  The kneading activates the gums in the product that make it elastic.  Probably 5 minutes of kneading.

2.  I always roll it out with the thinnest film of veg shortening smeared on the counter.  Haven't used a mat, just because I was taught to pick it up supported by my forearms and place it on the cake.

3.  Fondant goes on a cold cake better.

4.  The temp of your cake has nothing to do with making bubbles under the fondant.  

5.  Cakes don't make gas.

6.  There is, quite naturally, air inside you cake.  It may be between the filling and the cake layers (see thread on "My newest trick" to get air out of cakes and prevent bulging)  ;  it may be between the bc/ganache and fondant.  To allow it to escape, you *always* run a thin sharp knife edge along the bottom of the fondant and board.  Sealing up the cake too tightly by thoroughly pressing the fondant to the board traps the air underneath the fondant.  As it naturally tries to move out, you'll get a bubble.  If the tier is to be stacked, just poke a hole (skewer sized generally works) into the top.  This hole will be covered by the next tier.

7.  If you do get a bubble, insert the tiniest straw like thing you have into the bubble and suck the air out.  You are not putting your mouth on to the cake and you are not blowing onto it.  Suck the air out.  To repair the hole you just made, dissolve some of the fondant into water and make a thick, thick paste.  Using a light touch and a small spatula or knife edge, repair the hole with the paste.  

8.  To keep your fondant softer, after its applied, rub some veg shortening - a tiny bit - onto your hands and rub your hands lightly al over the cake.  It will be a bit shiny, but the fondant will stay a bit softer.  However, applying dusts will likely be streaky if you're applying them all over, and painting on the fondant will likely not be successful.  If you're just applying fondant decos, there's no problem.

9.  Fondant is *supposed* to get firm on the outside of the cake.,  Very firm.  Some people might call it hard.  It's what it's [I]designed[/I] to do.  It seals the cake.  If you don't like the product, use bc.

!

Wow! Awesome tips, especially on how to deflate a bubble! I've never thought of that!

Theodor Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 5:22pm
post #48 of 58

and it happend to me again with brown fondant from satin ice, by the time the cake was served it was cracked like craaaaaaaaaaazy :(

*

cakealicious7 Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 5:35pm
post #49 of 58

A

Original message sent by Theodor

and it happend to me again with brown fondant from satin ice, by the time the cake was served it was cracked like craaaaaaaaaaazy :( [URL=http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3180110/width/500/height/1000]* [/URL]

OMG that cake is sooo good!!

Gerle Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 5:55pm
post #50 of 58

Are you guys using the Satin Ice, or the Satin Ice Buttercream Fondant?  I use the Buttercream Fondant and don't seem to have the problems you're talking about here.  If I'm using fondant that is a bit older, meanig not bought the day before or the day of the cake covering, it can get a little dry, but it doesn't crack like you're talking about, especially if I knead it with a bit of shortening on my hands.  More times than not, it goes on the cake with no problem whatsoever.  I so far haven't covered a lot of cakes in fondant, but the ones I have, have been fine.  Maybe it's the consistency of the Buttercream Fondant over the regular fondant, I don't know.  I get the Buttercream one because it tastes a better than the regular one.  I have purchased the pre-colored Satin Ice (blue and red) and didn't have any cracking with those either.  But I do knead the dickens out of it!

Theodor Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 6:18pm
post #51 of 58

A

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerle 

Are you guys using the Satin Ice, or the Satin Ice Buttercream Fondant?  I use the Buttercream Fondant and don't seem to have the problems you're talking about here.  If I'm using fondant that is a bit older, meanig not bought the day before or the day of the cake covering, it can get a little dry, but it doesn't crack like you're talking about, especially if I knead it with a bit of shortening on my hands.  More times than not, it goes on the cake with no problem whatsoever.  I so far haven't covered a lot of cakes in fondant, but the ones I have, have been fine.  Maybe it's the consistency of the Buttercream Fondant over the regular fondant, I don't know.  I get the Buttercream one because it tastes a better than the regular one.  I have purchased the pre-colored Satin Ice (blue and red) and didn't have any cracking with those either.  But I do knead the dickens out of it!

 

i used this product and i kneaded it sooooo long it was hard to knead but fine , ended up cracking, never satin ice again

http://www.goldaskitchen.com/merchant.ihtml?pid=13649&step=4

Gerle Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 8:50pm
post #52 of 58

That's what I call the "regular" Satin Ice.  The kind I get definitely says "White/Buttercream" on the label.  And that is the problem with the buttercream one.....you can only get white, so you either color it or have to buy the "regular" Satin Ice to get colored.  I get it from a local cake supply store here in town.  I will admit....if I add gumpaste to the buttercream fondant, it will cause it to dry out more so than using the straight fondant, so I only use it for decorations, not for covering a cake.

kkat782 Posted 6 Feb 2014 , 4:58pm
post #53 of 58

I don't think I will ever use it to cover a cake again--it was awful. I didn't add gumpaste. I kneaded till my hands nearly fell off. When I used to use the Wilton fondant, this never happened but it was awful tasting. Any suggestions for a good tasting, reliable fondant that will cover cakes well?

handymama Posted 7 Feb 2014 , 11:20pm
post #54 of 58

I did a side by side taste test with several fondants, and Pettinice was the winner. For workability I like Pettinice, Bakery Craft's Ice 'n Easy, and Chocopan,

kkat782 Posted 8 Feb 2014 , 5:44pm
post #55 of 58

AThank you :-)

QuiteContrary Posted 6 May 2015 , 2:51pm
post #56 of 58

I used Satin Ice  for the first time a couple weeks ago. I had the same cracking and elephant skin issues. What about adding a spritz of water or a drop or two of glycerine to keep it a little bit moist?  Also what about addong some satin ice to mmf as a 50/50 mix

kylee528 Posted 12 Sep 2015 , 1:58am
post #57 of 58

I would also like to know about the water or glycerin thing. I used satin ice for the first time today, making records to place atop mini cupcakes. I cut discs out of black satin ice. All was great. Until they say out for a while on the counter. When I checked, some were beginning to crack. Maybe I rolled too thin? I am making 200 for a bridal show next weekend, and don't want to have this issue the morning of!! Thanks for any advice in advance!

JWinslow Posted 12 Sep 2015 , 2:10am
post #58 of 58

Kylee528,

I don't know about the water & glycerine but when I use Satin Ice black I mix it with either Fondx black or Duff  Black. 

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