MissCuteCupcakes Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 4:37pm
post #1 of

Last weekend I purchased a 20 lb bucket of white Satin Ice fondant for the first time. I have purchased their 5 lb buckets of red and black fondant, because I usually make my own (MMF) and I never had any problems. I love the taste and texture.

 

But last week I had 3 cakes and I just couldnt bother to make any fondant. So I covered all 3 cakes and I noticed that the fondant seems dry and it cracks, can anybody explain why this is happening?

 

I used chocolate ganache under each cake, and brushed it with water/corn syrup before covering with fondant. I thought that maybe I was rolling the fondant too thick so I tried to roll it thinner and noticed it was still happening. There was even a few little spots where it looked like it was going to rip, but I managed to cover that up with decorations.

 

Before rolling the fondant I kneeded it with some shortening and I used cornstarch instead of powdered sugar so it wouldnt dry out while kneeding.

 

Any ideas why this is happening?

54 replies
cakesrock Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 5:33pm
post #2 of

Don't worry - it's nothing YOU did! I have had the same issue, as I live in a very dry climate. You need to keep it covered ALL the time (with saran wrap or in bag)  and work quickly. If you are used to MMF, this is a very different type of fondant to work with.

handymama Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 5:48pm
post #3 of

MissCupcakes! CS is a DRYING AGENT! Don't use it, and don't use PS unless your fondant is too soft, which shouldn't happen with commercial fondant. Roll out using a silicone mat or The Mat, and be sure your cake is ready before you start your fondant (unless you use The Mat, in which case it will hold while you dampen your cake. I personally prefer Pettinice, Fondx or Fondariffic, but am considering taking the plunge with Massa Ticino.

leah_s Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 6:16pm
post #4 of

I've used SatinIce for years and just never have any problems with it.  I always roll it out on my counter coated with the thinest film of veg shortening.  Never use ps or cs.

Annabakescakes Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 6:28pm
post #5 of

Like I have stated a hundred times, I use corn starch EVERY.SINGLE. TIME I roll my fondant out, whether it is for a huge 16" cake, or a small accent piece. It cannot be beat, in my book! I think sugar is too sticky, and you have to use way too much to keep it from sticking. And it is hard for me to pry it up when I have used shortening, and I hate using a mat. It is just unnatural feeling to me, and I hate the way the fondant looks when it comes off of it.

SatinFineFoods Posted 19 Feb 2013 , 5:26pm
post #6 of

Hi MissCute Cupcakes,

Based on your comments, I would like to offer some suggestions for attaining a better result using your Satin Ice Fondant.

 

• We do not recommend using very much corn starch or shortening for handling the product. Both these products can alter the fondant and make it difficult to work with.

 

• If you find that your Satin Ice is dry or cracking when put on your cake, we would recommend additional kneading time. It is very important to knead the fondant until it is warm to reactivate the gums. This will help to increase elasticity and reduce cracking.

 

• If you prefer to use shortening when kneading the fondant, use a small amount on your hands and don't add any directly into the fondant. Also, if you prefer to use corn starch, add only a small amount on the surface that you roll the fondant out on.

 

I hope this helps you to work with your Satin Ice and please feel free to reply if you have any additional questions. You can also see our website www.satinice.com or our Facebook page www.facebook.com/satinfinefoods for additional Q&A's and tips.

 

Our best,

Your friends at Satin Fine Foods

MissCuteCupcakes Posted 19 Feb 2013 , 5:37pm
post #7 of

Thank you all for your input. It seems like we all have different results with these different types of fondants. Handymama I'm glad you mentioned The MAT because I have been watching youtube videos and reading reviews about it and I think I might give it a try. The cornstarch, powdered sugar, and shortening is getting way too messy anyways and my countertop always ends up all sticky.

 

I really do like Satin Ice, and I plan on still using them, but I'm going to try a different approach before I give them up completely!

kkat782 Posted 6 May 2013 , 6:40am
post #8 of

AI had the same problems. I bought 3 different buckets of the Satin Ice in different colors and it cracked like crazy. I did everything that was suggested--kneaded it forever, used only a tiny bit of powdered sugar when it stck to my silicone mat, and had the cake right there and ready to cover. I spent a lot of money and was so unhappy with the results. It also didn't roll out especially smoothly. Don't think I'll use this brand again--I spent a lot of money on it and really didn't like it at all.

SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 22 May 2013 , 1:35pm
post #9 of

AI was going to post a separate post, then found this one. I just decided to use Satin Ice for the first time last week. I kneaded it then rolled it out on a Wilton mat, not using anything sprinkled in the mat. Seemed to work great. Trimmed the excess fondant, then went to smooth the fondant that w on the cake, using the fondant smothers. They started sticking to the fondant, so I put a tiny bit of corn starch on my hands, then rubbed that onto one the fondant smothers, then smoothed the cake. The instructions in the Satin Ice bucket reads, [B]"Roll or sheet out fondant using a thin barrier of corn starch or powdered sugar to prevent sticking."[/B] If corn starch is the culprit, then it should not be listed on the instructions to use it. I used much less rubbing it on my hand than I would have if I had used it to roll it out, as the instructions suggested.

Everything seemed to be ok until the next morning. There were huge air bubbles under the fondant. I have never had that happen before. I took the fondant smoother to the cake, not realizing the fondant had dried so hard, and the fondant just cracked and collapsed. My cake was ruined. I was so upset, but thankfully one side looked ok, so I made that be the front. This was just a family cake, and I did not have any extra fondant to redo it.

I cannot believe how badly this Satin Ice fondant dried out; it was just a hard shell on the cake. The fondant decorations I put on the cake were like hard candy by the time the party rolled around. That was only 6 hours after I made them.

I decided to not even serve the cake and just used it as a party decoration. We had some other cupcakes we were able to serve. I'm really disappointed in this fondant, especially at $7.50 per pound. Yes, it was easier to work with, but I was embarrassed and could not serve my cake.

cakealicious7 Posted 22 May 2013 , 2:19pm

ATotally unrelated to the topic but SecretAgentCakeBaker- LOVE that name!!!!

SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 23 May 2013 , 4:38pm

AThanks! :)

pipesqueak Posted 23 May 2013 , 5:20pm

AI always use the Sweetwise mat for satin ice because it does dry out easily. The mat works beautifully and is well worth having. Satin ice is definitely one of the best tasting commercial fondants. Was the cake cold when you covered it? If it was then it forms gas as it warms and creates the big bubbles. Try to chill it only as much as absolutely necessary to firm it. If possible to drive a dowel in somewhere that will be covered by a decoration it makes a "chimney" to let the gas escape

leah_s Posted 25 May 2013 , 11:47am

I've used Satin Ice for years, and just do not have all the problems that others report.

1.  You do have to knead it until it warms up and becomes elastic.  The kneading activates the gums in the product that make it elastic.  Probably 5 minutes of kneading.

 

2.  I always roll it out with the thinnest film of veg shortening smeared on the counter.  Haven't used a mat, just because I was taught to pick it up supported by my forearms and place it on the cake.

 

3.  Fondant goes on a cold cake better.

 

4.  The temp of your cake has nothing to do with making bubbles under the fondant.  

 

5.  Cakes don't make gas.

 

6.  There is, quite naturally, air inside you cake.  It may be between the filling and the cake layers (see thread on "My newest trick" to get air out of cakes and prevent bulging)  ;  it may be between the bc/ganache and fondant.  To allow it to escape, you *always* run a thin sharp knife edge along the bottom of the fondant and board.  Sealing up the cake too tightly by thoroughly pressing the fondant to the board traps the air underneath the fondant.  As it naturally tries to move out, you'll get a bubble.  If the tier is to be stacked, just poke a hole (skewer sized generally works) into the top.  This hole will be covered by the next tier.

 

7.  If you do get a bubble, insert the tiniest straw like thing you have into the bubble and suck the air out.  You are not putting your mouth on to the cake and you are not blowing onto it.  Suck the air out.  To repair the hole you just made, dissolve some of the fondant into water and make a thick, thick paste.  Using a light touch and a small spatula or knife edge, repair the hole with the paste.  

 

8.  To keep your fondant softer, after its applied, rub some veg shortening - a tiny bit - onto your hands and rub your hands lightly al over the cake.  It will be a bit shiny, but the fondant will stay a bit softer.  However, applying dusts will likely be streaky if you're applying them all over, and painting on the fondant will likely not be successful.  If you're just applying fondant decos, there's no problem.

 

9.  Fondant is *supposed* to get firm on the outside of the cake.,  Very firm.  Some people might call it hard.  It's what it's designed to do.  It seals the cake.  If you don't like the product, use bc.

PEIgirl Posted 25 May 2013 , 11:57am

Just one tiny thing to add from a newbie...this happened to me recently when it tore and cracked on the edges and after some on-line reading I decided to check my expiry date and yes, my fondant was expired! I got out a fresh batch and made sure the expiry date was fine and voila, the cake covered just fine. Just a thought to double check that :)
 

MadBatterBaking Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 6:24pm

AMy biggest problem with satin ice is that it gets so hard that when I stack the cakes then transport it to another counter or the venue it cracks due to any movement. Is this normal? What should I be doing differently? I used the Duff Goldman fondant which never seems to stay moist (unhelpful at times) and now the only other fondant I've used is Satin Ice, so I've gone from super soft to super hard fondant. I live in Canada in a really dry climate. Does that effect fondant and cracking?

as you wish Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 6:50pm

A

Original message sent by MadBatterBaking

My biggest problem with satin ice is that it gets so hard that when I stack the cakes then transport it to another counter or the venue it cracks due to any movement. Is this normal? What should I be doing differently? I used the Duff Goldman fondant which never seems to stay moist (unhelpful at times) and now the only other fondant I've used is Satin Ice, so I've gone from super soft to super hard fondant. I live in Canada in a really dry climate. Does that effect fondant and cracking?

Your problem might be with what your cake is sitting on. If you use a cake board with any flexibility in it your fondant is likely to crack when you pick up the cake. I like to use hardboard or MDF board.

MBalaska Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 7:01pm

.....at $7.50 per pound...For Satin Ice Fondant !! That is incredible. 

The local craft store here sells it for $18.95.

Thus the reason I learned to make MarshMallow Fondant, and will attempt to make Standard Fondant with Glycerin.

 (Really interesting Forum BTW.) 

BatterUpCake Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 7:35pm

$18.95 for a pound or the 2 lb tub? I buy the 2 lb tub of white for $14.95 and any other color is $18.95. I have had a lot of trouble with it when covering cakes. I will try kneading more. Also the black is so sticky coming out of the tub it sticks like bread dough all over my hand...it's kind of gooey. Did I get a bad batch? My white isn't like that at all...

 

Also I can get Pettinice for $38/15 lb...which is a fantastic price. I was just worried how long it will last without drying out. I have never used it or tasted it. ANyone else here use it?

as you wish Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 7:47pm

AWow! I pay $41.75 for eleven pounds of Satin Ice. That comes out to just $3.80 per pound. I guess I'm getting good deal!

BatterUpCake Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 7:49pm

It gets less expensive the more you buy. On GSA for 20lb it is $60

 

oops..it's @53.99.

as you wish Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 7:51pm

AWell that makes sense! :) Too bad GSA charges an arm and a leg to ship to Canada; that is a nice price! Edit: I need to rephrase that. It's not that GSA charges a lot for shipping, it is that it costs a lot for GSA to ship to Canada. It's not their fault!

howsweet Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 8:24pm

I've used Satin Ice for years and never have had any problems like others describe. That is until my last 3 buckets which were too soft and yet also cracked. I don't know if they've changed the formula to suit dryer climates or if I got a bad batch.  I'm going to try some from another lot, but if this is indeed a formula change, I'll be looking for a different brand. Pettinice was a little too soft, but at least it didn't crack.

 

Also, I've been having to add significantly more tylose to get it harden for 3d figures.

 

I added a little glucose which solved the cracking problem, but it doesn't solve the problem of its being too soft.
 

BatterUpCake Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 8:41pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 
I added a little glucose which solved the cracking problem, but it doesn't solve the problem of its being too soft.
 

IMO though you should not have to add anything to a product to get it to perform like it is supposed to in the first place...

howsweet Posted 10 Aug 2013 , 8:55pm

I agree - it's just that I had three 20 lb buckets of the bad stuff and no time to deal with returning them and possibly still have the same problem. I try not to go to the supplier more than once a month.
 

MBalaska Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 1:06am

Yes your right, i'm an airhead,    It is $19.95  for a 2 lb. tub.  whew. 

That's why I use it sparingly.

When I have a good bit of left over fondant and don't want it to go bad and waste my money, I sometimes put it in a seal-a-meal bag and use the vacuum packer to seal it up well.  Just like doing fish or meat.

BatterUpCake Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 1:12am

that's a great idea....I could buy the 15 lb bucket for $2.50 a lb and divide it up with my food saver! Genius!!

MBalaska Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 2:34am

I've gone from a self proclaimed airhead, to genius in one day.  cool.  birthday.gif

actually we have to be a little inventive in our shack, "make do" as my folks used to say. 

After you pack them, put them back in the bucket and close it tight.  hope this works for you. 

BatterUpCake Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 2:44am

I knew there was a reason I bought that darn thing. I planned on growing a garden and freezing all these fresh veggies and bulk meat on sale. Then I started this adventure and I have enought time for sandwiches and salads. The whole business side takes so much research and time spent marketing. Now I have a real use for it

JWinslow Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 2:52am
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 

I've used Satin Ice for years and never have had any problems like others describe. That is until my last 3 buckets which were too soft and yet also cracked. I don't know if they've changed the formula to suit dryer climates or if I got a bad batch.  I'm going to try some from another lot, but if this is indeed a formula change, I'll be looking for a different brand. Pettinice was a little too soft, but at least it didn't crack.

 

Also, I've been having to add significantly more tylose to get it harden for 3d figures.

 

I added a little glucose which solved the cracking problem, but it doesn't solve the problem of its being too soft.
 


I thought it was just me.  I thought the Satin Ice seemed softer than what I remembered.  I'm going to be using it again this month (black).  Here's hoping this one comes out better than the last...

MBalaska Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 2:52am

The heat sealer on the vacuum sealer "Food Saver" is also very useful, all by itself.  Open a bag of royal icing, meringue, candy melts, sprinkles anything with the type of heavy plastic, cellophane, poly bag (I even do this to pretzel bags) cut the very top nice and straight and high up.

Take out what you need.  gently press some of the air out, and put the very top part of the bag on the heat sealing element.....close the lid and seal it.  No vacuuming, just heat seal it. 

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%