Heat Sealer?

Lounge By Annabakescakes Updated 20 Feb 2013 , 4:18am by Annabakescakes

Annabakescakes Posted 12 Feb 2013 , 8:51pm
post #1 of 25

Anyone use one? Anyway to make it cheaper? I saw on another forum, "Why would anyone spend $2.30 (the cost of the bag) to save half a $ .99 avocado?"

 

Zipper bags? Fold-over bags? I saw a guy use BPA free, recycled painter tarp.... icon_confused.gif

 

Best model? 

 

I want to use it mostly for left overs, so that I can still serve them  and have them taste and look good, when I am Caking. Currently, we buy a LOT of pizza, and frozen burritos. 

24 replies
Izzy Sweet Posted 12 Feb 2013 , 9:37pm
post #2 of 25

if you are talking about the vacuum and then heat seal, I have one for when my hubby goes fishing and we have fish to freeze..I love it and mine has an option for moistness or not..I have been using it for everything from cake, fish and even paint brushes... so many uses lol.It keeps everything just like the day you put it in there.

jason_kraft Posted 12 Feb 2013 , 9:57pm
post #3 of 25

AWe use Ziploc freezer bags, never had a problem keeping food in the freezer for a few months at a time. Gallon size freezer bags are about 10 cents each at Costco.

kblickster Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 12:32am
post #4 of 25

I love my FoodSaver.  I have about a 1/2 acre garden in the summer and freeze a lot of vegetables.  We buy meat in bulk when it's on sale.  I cook a large amount of food at one time and seal up enough for 2 portions.  Lasagna, spaghetti, roast beef and gravy w/mashed potatoes, meatloaf, soups.  The soups and really wet foods I freeze before sealing.  I have a large commercial freezer so I have lots of room.  It's so nice when working on cakes to be able to just reheat a healthy meal.  No extra mess in the kitchen and we still eat fairly healthy.

 

Tip - sign up at the foodsaver website.  About twice a year they have decent sales on their bags.  I stock up at about 50% savings.  Still not as cheap as ziplocks on sale - but my food is much better for longer periods of time.

jason_kraft Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 12:41am
post #5 of 25

A

Original message sent by kblickster

Tip - sign up at the foodsaver website.  About twice a year they have decent sales on their bags.  I stock up at about 50% savings.  Still not as cheap as ziplocks on sale - but my food is much better for longer periods of time.

How long do you typically keep food frozen before thawing?

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 1:27am
post #6 of 25

AThanks guys! I was thinking of trying to justify it by putting my fillings in bags, too. It takes just a bit longer to make a gallon of filling as it does a pint, do you think you could slice off a corner , use what you need and re-seal? How much material is used when you seal?

I read in a blog that a lady ate a steak she marinated, sealed and froze 2 years previously. By her account, it was amazing!

Bluehue Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 2:27am
post #7 of 25

Also love my foid saver...

No frist bite on any food... which can happen when air gets trapped in other types of bags.

Especially seafood.

 

I have used it to keep fondant in - after i have coloured it.

I flattened it out - then vac sealed...5 months later i needed that colour - opened it up - it was as soft as the day i kneeded it.

 

Even vacced ganache in a bag - better for storage as the bags lay flat in the freezer - thus taking up less space

 

Bluehue

Bluehue Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 2:30am
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue 

Also love my food saver...

No frist bite on any food... which can happen when air gets trapped in other types of bags.

Especially seafood.

 

I have used it to keep fondant in - after i have coloured it.

I flattened it out - then vac sealed...5 months later i needed that colour - opened it up - it was as soft as the day i kneeded it.

 

Even vacced ganache in a bag - better for storage as the bags lay flat in the freezer - thus taking up less space

 

Bluehue

 

edited... spelling mistake

cazza1 Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 3:07am
post #9 of 25

I love mine.  I buy my meat in bulk and as mentioned above there is never any frost bite and it keeps much better for much longer.  I also sous vide  a lot of my meat and so it is already vacuum packed and ready to go.  I also vacuum seal and freeze my modelling paste.  Being a hobbyist decorator a batch of modelling paste is far too much for me to use up all at once. 

You can also use it to marinate your food in a hurry.  When you suck the air out marinade will penetrate your food much quicker.

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Feb 2013 , 4:27pm
post #10 of 25

I need to buy my meat in bulk more. I shop at restaurant depot for the business, and have often gotten frozen chicken, and huge boxes of cheese sticks and fries, and such, which keeps well, but I am lazy about portioning meat out, and when I do, we get sick of it before it is gone, then I inevitably find the rest of it in the bottom of the freezer, discolored and weird smelling. Really defeats the purpose of buying it is bulk, when you waste it!  

cazza1 Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 3:29am
post #11 of 25

Anna the price you mentioned for bags is exhorbitant.  If you get a food sealer go onto ebay and buy them in bulk.  You can also recycle some of them, depending on what you have stored in them.
 

Stitches Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 3:34pm
post #12 of 25

My hubby wanted the Food Saver, I thought it was dumb....a waste of money. But now, I LOVE our Food Saver, I use it all the time for business. Use the setting that pulls the air out of the bag...it's brilliant! I use regular Ziploc bags for most items that are inexpensive or things I'll use quickly.

 

Sealing prevents room for ice crystals to form on the food. So for fillings and fruits it's got to work great. I buy meats in bulk and seal them wit- out air, they last forever with-out showing any damage.

 

I have a toffee business in addition to doing cakes. I use my Food Saver to seal my 4 oz. bags of toffee. It's sooooo much cheaper then commercial sealers and easy too. I buy my bags in bulk and they look as professional as a factory produced item.

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 5:35pm
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue 

Also love my food saver...

No frost bite on any food... which can happen when air gets trapped in other types of bags.

Especially seafood.

 

I have used it to keep fondant in - after i have coloured it.

I flattened it out - then vac sealed...5 months later i needed that colour - opened it up - it was as soft as the day i kneeded it.

 

Even vacced ganache in a bag - better for storage as the bags lay flat in the freezer - thus taking up less space

 

Bluehue

Hi Blue, is it a store bought fondant, or home-made? Did you store it on the counter, or in the fridge or freezer? I love that idea! I currently throw away a  several pounds a month, and have used some, for tiny details, that was a bit "off". Not moldy or sour, but a bit weird. 

 

The ganache in the bag is brilliant, mine always gets crystals on the edges, and I will cut portions off of it, and try to salvage the rest! 

 

(and I fixed the second typo for you, (unless it is called 'frist bite' down under, if it is, then I apologize ;-) ) 

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 6:23pm
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cazza1 

Anna the price you mentioned for bags is exhorbitant.  If you get a food sealer go onto ebay and buy them in bulk.  You can also recycle some of them, depending on what you have stored in them.
 

That is certainly good to know!

Annabakescakes Posted 15 Feb 2013 , 6:25pm
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitches 

My hubby wanted the Food Saver, I thought it was dumb....a waste of money. But now, I LOVE our Food Saver, I use it all the time for business. Use the setting that pulls the air out of the bag...it's brilliant! I use regular Ziploc bags for most items that are inexpensive or things I'll use quickly.

 

Sealing prevents room for ice crystals to form on the food. So for fillings and fruits it's got to work great. I buy meats in bulk and seal them wit- out air, they last forever with-out showing any damage.

 

I have a toffee business in addition to doing cakes. I use my Food Saver to seal my 4 oz. bags of toffee. It's sooooo much cheaper then commercial sealers and easy too. I buy my bags in bulk and they look as professional as a factory produced item.

That is super cool! You'll have to send me a "sample" lol, so I can "inspect the packaging" ;-) (Just kidding, don't you hate when people always ask for samples? You know you want it, pick up the phone and place an order!!)

Bluehue Posted 16 Feb 2013 , 6:25pm
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

Hi Blue, is it a store bought fondant, or home-made? Did you store it on the counter, or in the fridge or freezer? I love that idea! I currently throw away a  several pounds a month, and have used some, for tiny details, that was a bit "off". Not moldy or sour, but a bit weird. 

 

The ganache in the bag is brilliant, mine always gets crystals on the edges, and I will cut portions off of it, and try to salvage the rest! 

 

(and I fixed the second typo for you, (unless it is called 'frist bite' down under, if it is, then I apologize ;-) ) 

Hi Anna...

Store bought and home made... after i have finished using what i need... i kneed the left overs, then roll it out into portions of about 8 inches x 8 inches square, pop it in the seeler bag - vac seal, put a label on it with type of fondant and date then lay them flat in my freezer. I lay a sheet of baking paper between each bag - makes for easier seperating for when i need one of the bags.

 

Oh freezing ganache in the bags is great...

When seeled...just lay the bags flat, pop date label on bag then i pop them in the fridge until they are cold and firm, then straight into the freezer.

By doing this it takes up less room that plastic containers.

Have used ganache from the freezer after its been there for 6 months.... you would never know it hasn't been freshly made when you take it out.

I leave on bench overnight to thaw - then give a little zap in microwave - then stir stir stir thumbs_up.gif

 

FRIST BITE icon_lol.gif...oh thats a word used all the time over here....it means not as cold as FROST BITE.....................................just kidding.icon_wink.gif

Thanks for correcting the typo

 

From where i sit - yep, you need a vac sealer machine.... best thing for seafood....  no frost bite, which mens no added moisture in the packaging.

Even for freezing any left over ham (if you have any) after christmas..... perfect.

Mince - whether chicken, lamb, beef or pork.... pack, vac and label...lay them all flat in your freezer....takes up hardly any room.... again, perfect

 

When we are travelling...i vac seal the shampoo and conditioner bottles.... no matter how much our cases get thrown around... no spills through the cases....  Ughhhh, learnt the hard way with that senario

 

Worth every cent i paid for it.

 

Bluehue

Annabakescakes Posted 16 Feb 2013 , 7:49pm
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue 

Hi Anna...

Store bought and home made... after i have finished using what i need... i kneed the left overs, then roll it out into portions of about 8 inches x 8 inches square, pop it in the seeler bag - vac seal, put a label on it with type of fondant and date then lay them flat in my freezer. I lay a sheet of baking paper between each bag - makes for easier seperating for when i need one of the bags.

 

Oh freezing ganache in the bags is great...

When seeled...just lay the bags flat, pop date label on bag then i pop them in the fridge until they are cold and firm, then straight into the freezer.

By doing this it takes up less room that plastic containers.

Have used ganache from the freezer after its been there for 6 months.... you would never know it hasn't been freshly made when you take it out.

I leave on bench overnight to thaw - then give a little zap in microwave - then stir stir stir thumbs_up.gif

 

FRIST BITE icon_lol.gif...oh thats a word used all the time over here....it means not as cold as FROST BITE.....................................just kidding.icon_wink.gif

Thanks for correcting the typo

 

From where i sit - yep, you need a vac sealer machine.... best thing for seafood....  no frost bite, which mens no added moisture in the packaging.

Even for freezing any left over ham (if you have any) after christmas..... perfect.

Mince - whether chicken, lamb, beef or pork.... pack, vac and label...lay them all flat in your freezer....takes up hardly any room.... again, perfect

 

When we are travelling...i vac seal the shampoo and conditioner bottles.... no matter how much our cases get thrown around... no spills through the cases....  Ughhhh, learnt the hard way with that senario

 

Worth every cent i paid for it.

 

Bluehue

I am definitely getting one! This thread has "sealed" it thumbs_up.gif

 

I had my shampoo leak onto my tooth brush, and I didn't know until I brushed my teeth and had suds some out! And boy, was it NASTY!

 

I HAVE to have it for my fondant and ganache, I don't know how many times I have wasted a load of it because the plastic wrap had a missed spot, or the tub in the fridge didn't seal, or the bag wasn't airtight...I could go on and on!

 

I just got some stock pots and I will be making 20 quarts of vegetable soup! When bought in bulk, I can feed my family (6 of us) for $2 and add some grilled cheese for another $2.

 

And I just saw pork loin on special for $.79 a pound! I make pulled pork and "chops" out of it and it is AMAZING! I love that when it is homemade, you can pull all the tubes and fatty or chewy parts out, and there are no unpleasant surprises when eating ;-)

 

I would also love to cook my hamburger meat before I freeze it, to make quicker meals, but the frying often helps remove any "freezer weirdness flavor" I won't have to worry about it now!

 

And, I just had to throw away a package of dried apricots :-( I hoarded them, and then they got weird before I could eat them all, because the zipper seal wasn't airtight!

Annabakescakes Posted 16 Feb 2013 , 9:01pm
post #18 of 25

Now I am confused again! Heat sealer vs food saver and what model???

kblickster Posted 16 Feb 2013 , 9:43pm
post #19 of 25

I am on my second one in 20 years.  My old one was just a flat food saver (looked more like the V2244 on their website).  I now have one of the upright models.  I like that the bags are stored and easily cut straight from the machine.  It does seem to use about a 1/2 inch more bag per seal than the old model. 

 

I forgot to say that I also have Pecan trees and like someone else mentioned, these things are great for nuts.  I shell them, seal them and use them year round.  I also pick my own fruit in season and freeze it for use in cakes and pies.   

 

Jason, as far as how long stuff lasts, we try to eat everything within one year.  Make sure to rotate your food when you put it in the freezer.

 

Foods that you don't want mashed should be frozen and then bagged and sealed.  I just put them on a baking sheet and freeze them before bagging and sealing.  Blueberries, strawberries, breaded okra, etc. 

 

Thanks for the tips about the ganache.  I have frozen fondant and buttercream, but never ganache.

cazza1 Posted 17 Feb 2013 , 11:41am
post #20 of 25

Google vacuum sealers and research from there.  There are multiple brands on the market.
 

Bluehue Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 1:55am
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

Now I am confused again! Heat sealer vs food saver and what model???

Anna, i have this one...it is a food saver http://www.sunbeam.com.au/products/kitchen/vs4400/

 

If i am using it to seel cookies in bags for customers i just use the *heat seeling* button...not the vac button...iykwim.

I bought mine when there was a sale on, so got it for about $80.00 less than the RRP.

 

Not sure what brands you hasve over there.... but if you buy the food saver...then you can use it for both methods.. = vac seeling and just seeling.

 

Hope this helps.

Blue

Annabakescakes Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 5:30pm
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by cazza1 

Google vacuum sealers and research from there.  There are multiple brands on the market.
 

Yeah, I have Googled....I don't know all I don't know. I was looking for recommendations.

Annabakescakes Posted 18 Feb 2013 , 5:35pm
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue 

Anna, i have this one...it is a food saver http://www.sunbeam.com.au/products/kitchen/vs4400/

 

If i am using it to seel cookies in bags for customers i just use the *heat seeling* button...not the vac button...iykwim.

I bought mine when there was a sale on, so got it for about $80.00 less than the RRP.

 

Not sure what brands you hasve over there.... but if you buy the food saver...then you can use it for both methods.. = vac seeling and just seeling.

 

Hope this helps.

Blue

WOW! That one looks nice, and $80 less is nice too ;-) I was looking at the ones on Foodsaver.com and it is so confusing, because the models look only slightly different, and the prices vary, and the specs are confusing!

 

Has anyone figured out a way to seal a zipper bag without cutting off the zipper? I guess you could go up from the bottom, but they have these cool bags that are resealable from the front. And the zipper works, great for cheese, and such! (I just threw away a half a block of green cheese!)

Bluehue Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 2:56am
post #24 of 25

AHmmmmm...be careful what type of plastic you use Anna...some (most) aren't suitable for the machines as they melt under the heat. ...and then u have melted plastic all over your machine... Not worth the drama. Blue

Annabakescakes Posted 20 Feb 2013 , 4:18am
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue 

Hmmmmm...be careful what type of plastic you use Anna...some (most) aren't suitable for the machines as they melt under the heat. ...and then u have melted plastic all over your machine... Not worth the drama.
Blue

I agree! That is why I am asking other people if they have done it, so I don't have to experiment, lol!

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