mystsparkle Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 12:32pm
post #1 of

I thought i'd start another Price the Cake - One for a Birthday related cake ! 

 

This isn't my cake - But I did recreate it as a 10 inch round and sold it for $110 - no toys included in that price (I'm located in Florida)

 

Just like to see what others would charge. :) Thanks!

38 replies
DeliciousDesserts Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 12:44pm
post #2 of

Awesome Lego cake!  I really like it.  It's so much more awesome than the giant lego cake.

 

Are we saying this is a 10"?  Or a 9"?

 

I'm assuming 9" figures not included.

 

$75

tracyaem Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 12:48pm
post #3 of

For a 9-inch with no figures, $88.

MyThreeCakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 12:59pm
post #4 of

For a 10" no toys I would get $135.00, and I'm located in Maine.

Suuske Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 1:08pm
post #5 of

10" figures not included $60

Annabakescakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 1:53pm
post #6 of

AFor a 9", 30 servings, at $3.50 each, no figures, would be $105.

Stitches Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 2:38pm
post #7 of

10" I can't get 30 servings out of that, tops 24. In Chicago burbs it's $75.00.

-K8memphis Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 3:02pm
post #8 of

so far we average about $2.67 a serving

 

using wilton chart 39 servings for a 10 unless 32 servings for a 9 was specified--4-5" tall

 

had to pick a standard to go by

 

we range from $1.54 to $3.50 per serving

 

why isn't a fondant cake coming out higher i wonder

Suuske Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 3:07pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suuske 

10" figures not included $60


Perhaps I should have mentioned that my 10" "only"  feeds 20 ... we have larger servings here in the Netherlands.

-K8memphis Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 3:27pm

yes--it's just a loose average

 

just trying to give it a perspective. a cohesion

 

and trying to find a common denominator between different sized cakes and servings

 

i just landed on arguably the most universal standard--wilton wedding chart

 

not fully scientific i guess just a math computation

DeliciousDesserts Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 3:57pm

AYes, when we post a cake for the day we kind of need to specify the details so we are all quoting the same cake.

I wasn't sure if this was a 9 or 10 so I quoted the 9 that is most popular.

-K8memphis Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 4:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

Yes, when we post a cake for the day we kind of need to specify the details so we are all quoting the same cake.

I wasn't sure if this was a 9 or 10 so I quoted the 9 that is most popular.

 

 

~tongue in cheek~

 

sure, delicious, whatever you say

 

y'know don't let the fact that op designated a 10" size flavor your rogue delicious decision

 

icon_lol.gif

 

jk jk jk kinda ;)

DeliciousDesserts Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 4:17pm

A

Original message sent by -K8memphis

~tongue in cheek~

sure, delicious, whatever you say

y'know don't let the fact that op [I]designated a 10"[/I] size flavor your [S]rogue[/S] delicious decision

:lol:

jk jk jk kinda ;)

Actually, the op stated this is Not the 10" cake she recreated. If you read my response, I stated I want certain if we were doing the cake pictures or the 10".

-K8memphis Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 4:25pm

yes correct

mystsparkle Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 6:53pm

Thanks for all the answers! (These threads are pretty fun, and very informative!)

 

I was kind of surprised the prices weren't higher either.  It took me about 3 hours to make the fondant/cut all the pieces and place it on the cake. Plus the time to bake/board/box/ingreidents etc...  Also  I did do it as a 10 inch for my price, which I state you can get 25-30 servings.  A 9inch I would think around 20-25 servings at a price of $92

Annabakescakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 6:53pm

A

Original message sent by DeliciousDesserts

Yes, when we post a cake for the day we kind of need to specify the details so we are all quoting the same cake.

I wasn't sure if this was a 9 or 10 so I quoted the 9 that is most popular.

It certainly has then proportions of a 9". That's why I quoted a 9.

Annabakescakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 6:57pm

AAnd, what up with all the low serving counts and low prices? That would take an age putting that on the side, and all those dots on top.

Godot Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 7:05pm

10" - $266

denetteb Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 7:05pm

I don't sell but it seems that part of the reason so many people charge so little is they are using non-Wilton serving charts.  Wilton wedding (which generally is thought of as the industry standard in the US) has 10 inch serving 38, 9 inch serving 32.  If people are figuring for 20-24 servings they will be charging a LOT less for the same cake.  Another question I have been having with these pricing threads,is .......are the post responders having a successful and financially solvent business, are they actually profitable?

Godot Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 7:07pm

I have a successful, financially solvent and profitable business. Storefront - 2 employees. Bake from scratch with quality ingredients. Purchased fondant (Renshaw).

kikiandkyle Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 7:37pm

I don't intend to charge by the serving when I start up my business, because honestly there's no way I'd tell someone they'd get almost 40 pieces out of a 10" cake. I'll be charging by the size of the tier, and giving people an idea of how many servings they may get from it, depending on how generous they want to be. I've never been given a matchbox sized piece of cake at a party or a wedding, but maybe my friends knew me well enough to know better! 

hieperdepiep Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 8:40pm

A

Original message sent by Suuske

Perhaps I should have mentioned that my 10" "only"  feeds 20 ... we have larger servings here in the Netherlands.

Hi suuske! I am a big fan of your cakepops! Being from the Netherlands as well I know the `cakeclimate `problems we have here. I`ll try to write English so the rest can follow us. If you would be a hobbybaker you have a nice price and will have some euro`s left after some hours of fun. But maybe you are a professional homebaker? How many hours would you spend on this cake? What would your hourrate be you give yourself? Serving sizes differ as well because you probable bake with biscuit, which is much lighter. Americans use cake as their base, wich you would probably slice thinner as well (although we are too hungry people for the wilton chart ;-)

SugaredSaffron Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 9:12pm

A£155/$242 for the 10", no matter how many slices they cut it into!

Chellescakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 9:21pm

9 inch $200, 10 Inch $250  , I too don't care how many pieces they cut it into . I price out at one by two inch pieces, That just helps me get a price for the cake. I give a guide of how many it will feed . But it is up to the client how big they cut the pieces.  I either do mudcake or fruitcake so often you don't need a large piece anyway. 

Suuske Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 9:37pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by hieperdepiep 


Hi suuske!
I am a big fan of your cakepops! Being from the Netherlands as well I know the `cakeclimate `problems we have here. I`ll try to write English so the rest can follow us. If you would be a hobbybaker you have a nice price and will have some euro`s left after some hours of fun. But maybe you are a professional homebaker? How many hours would you spend on this cake? What would your hourrate be you give yourself?
Serving sizes differ as well because you probable bake with biscuit, which is much lighter. Americans use cake as their base, wich you would probably slice thinner as well (although we are too hungry people for the wilton chart icon_wink.gif


oef ... many questions icon_smile.gif and thanks for the compliment.

 

I'm a semi professional homebaker ... (I know, very vague), meaning I still have a dayjob that pays my bills; also meaning I am in the situation of transitioning and getting the paperwork in order, also declaring all my "earnings" (if you can call it that) to the tax authorities ... Last year I had cakes where I actually earned just a few bucks (literally!) on the cakes I made ... I learned fast, very fast.

 

That cake would probably take me 4 to 5 hours in total baking, decorating, cleaning (the colored blocks probaby taking up most of my time), so after deduction of costs, I would end up with probably with an hourly rate somewhere in the region of of $ 9.

 

I use a sponge cake, which is bit more heavier but a lot less dry. I try to tell people not to cut "applepie servings", but indeed ... we are a hungry bunch icon_lol.gif

Annabakescakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 10:15pm

A[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/2919504/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

That is my cake slice dummy, on a saucer. It is 1"x2"x 4.5" I wouldn't want anymore cake tan that, and we cut an 8" single layer into 12 pieces to serve the family dessert. It is the size it should be (an 8" double layer would be 24 slices) I am the fattest one here, and it is plenty cake.

Hardly match boxed size.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 10:24pm

AI want a slice dummy!!!

Annabakescakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 10:32pm

A

Original message sent by DeliciousDesserts

I want a slice dummy!!!

Hubby cut it for me on my table saw, from a 2x4. I should've sanded it, but I am LAZY! I only want to work for cash ;-)

I use it to educate every person who walks through the doors. I say,"this is 1x2x4.5 inches and the size a slice of cake should be. So hold it, and memorize and check the table at the reception; if your slices are much larger or smaller, you will not be getting the best value for your wedding cake budget."

kikiandkyle Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 10:42pm

I was referring to the 1x2x2 servings!

Annabakescakes Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 10:46pm

A

Original message sent by kikiandkyle

I was referring to the 1x2x2 servings!

Who the heck cuts good cake that small? They need to be taken out back and whipped, severely! If it is a Christmas fruit cake, they can keep it...

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%