MsMonica Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 12:08am
post #1 of

I finally ordered my Dobord! After waiting a week and still no payment/shipping processing, I called and was informed Dobords are no longer being produced. icon_sad.gif Bummer! Although she did say there would be a similar item being made, it wont be available for a few months. I have been using rings around my rolling pin but i haven't been able to find a large enough rolling pin that can cover a wide amount of dough and fit the rings I have. I've tried wooden slats but they move around too much. I'm thinking the dowels would do the same.

 

Any other tips or suggestions?

 

Thanks everyone!

45 replies
-K8memphis Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 12:15am
post #2 of

i don't know how anyone uses dowel--mine roll off in the sunset somewhere

 

but i have a dobord and it's the rolling pin that i love the best

 

now i just stack up different yardsticks for different heights that i want

fearlessbaker Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 1:00am
post #3 of

Perfection strips from Country Kitchen Sweet Arts.

Cakepro Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 1:42am
post #4 of

LMAO...

 

SQUARE dowels people.

 

Sorry to laugh, but K8's reply made me imagine someone trying to use round dowels for this purpose.

-K8memphis Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 2:17am
post #5 of

icon_lol.gif

 

no wonder they wouldn't fricken stay put

 

nobody ever said square dowel

 

i'm a cake decorator-- i use round dowel!

 

hey all i can say is my yardsticks don't roll off

 

icon_biggrin.gif

MsMonica Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 2:38am
post #6 of

LOL! Sorry, but just like K8, I also pictured round dowels! That's why I was so puzzled at how the heck that would work!! Duh! Square dowels! Thanks for clarifying!!

mariel9898 Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 2:50am
post #7 of

I love my Dobord! I had heard that they stopped making them months ago when a friend tried to buy one and found out that she couldn't. The only thing that would make the Dobord better is if they made it the size of a half sheet pan.

shanter Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 4:12am
post #8 of

Maybe:

http://www.armchair.com/store/gourmet/baking/rollingpin.html

Kathy107 Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 4:16pm
post #9 of

Hi shanter, Have you ever ordered anything from thearmchair.com?  Thanks. I am thinking about ordering this from them.  Kathy

VicB213 Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 4:37pm

Between the pastry cloth and the dowels (which I learned about from here) I have been having great results from sugar cookies to doggie biscuits... I love the way they work. Maybe add the pastry cloth??

-K8memphis Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 4:39pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by VicB213 

Between the pastry cloth and the dowels (which I learned about from here) I have been having great results from sugar cookies to doggie biscuits... I love the way they work. Maybe add the pastry cloth??

 

 

pastry cloth?

 

i was absent on that day!

 

musta been the freaking square dowel day ;)

-K8memphis Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 4:54pm

oh i thought that was for pie dough

 

it would get all icky with cookie dough no?

 

like to roll mine out on foil or parchment--then i can bake right on that too

shanter Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 5:21pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathy107 

Hi shanter, Have you ever ordered anything from thearmchair.com?  Thanks. I am thinking about ordering this from them.  Kathy

 



Kathy107,

I haven't ordered from them, so I can't help you with how they operate. That was just the only one I found for sale.

Good luck,

shanter

shanter Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 5:29pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

oh i thought that was for pie dough

 

it would get all icky with cookie dough no?

 

like to roll mine out on foil or parchment--then i can bake right on that too

 

K8,

My Foley pastry cloth has been used mostly for pie dough, but I have also rolled out cookies on it. It doesn't really get icky, and if it does, it can be washed. The only thing about washing it is that it shrank a bit so I had to iron the heck out of it to get it completely flat again (the seam thread shrank a teensy bit more than the canvas). Parchment is a great idea! I just do things the way my mom taught me (lo these many decades ago) and she didn't use parchment. I'm not even sure it was available back in the olden days of my youth.

-K8memphis Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 5:35pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter 

 

K8,

My Foley pastry cloth has been used mostly for pie dough, but I have also rolled out cookies on it. It doesn't really get icky, and if it does, it can be washed. The only thing about washing it is that it shrank a bit so I had to iron the heck out of it to get it completely flat again (the seam thread shrank a teensy bit more than the canvas). Parchment is a great idea! I just do things the way my mom taught me (lo these many decades ago) and she didn't use parchment. I'm not even sure it was available back in the olden days of my youth.

 

gotcha

 

iron? <thud.> i fainted  icon_biggrin.gif i'm way too lazy for that ;)--slap it on the table & go go go

 

yeah parchment was used commercially forever before it became available to the homemaker--but i don't know how far back it goes

shanter Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 7:38pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

 

iron? <thud.> i fainted  icon_biggrin.gif i'm way too lazy for that ;)--slap it on the table & go go go

 

That would have worked if I'd dried it flat, but I dried it to very dry in the dryer, so it came out all crumpled.

 

A hint I learned (not all that long ago), is to put the pastry cloth in the freezer for a while before you roll out pie crust or whatever. It helps to keep the fat component from melting while you're working with it.

-K8memphis Posted 7 Feb 2013 , 8:09pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter 

 

That would have worked if I'd dried it flat, but I dried it to very dry in the dryer, so it came out all crumpled.

 

A hint I learned (not all that long ago), is to put the pastry cloth in the freezer for a while before you roll out pie crust or whatever. It helps to keep the fat component from melting while you're working with it.

that's an excellent hint to freeze it

 

but i meant i would not use it--no patience ;)

 

i'm too lazy to iron something like that-- i'd just roll it out on the squeaky clean counter or table top, place mat, waxed paper

 

icon_biggrin.gif

VicB213 Posted 8 Feb 2013 , 9:12pm

K8 - I use my pastry cloth for pie and cookies and then I use a seperate one for the doggy biscuits... I find it is a great piece of cloth... I get them at BBB and it usually comes with a rolling pin sock which to be honest I never use...

VicB213 Posted 8 Feb 2013 , 9:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter 

 

That would have worked if I'd dried it flat, but I dried it to very dry in the dryer, so it came out all crumpled.

 

A hint I learned (not all that long ago), is to put the pastry cloth in the freezer for a while before you roll out pie crust or whatever. It helps to keep the fat component from melting while you're working with it.

That is a brilliant idea... think I may have to borrow it...

-K8memphis Posted 8 Feb 2013 , 9:20pm

vic--what's bbb? oh wait i got it--bed bath & beyond!

 

i should prolly try this some day before i bequeath my rolling pins to the kids ;)

 

we gotta ways to go!!!

shanter Posted 8 Feb 2013 , 11:08pm

I always use both the pastry cloth and the rolling pin cover. A little flour on the cloth and the pin cover works its way into the fibers - no sticking and not much excess flour to shake off the cloth when done. I'm not the only one who finds this way much easier than just rolling out on a counter or cutting board. However, I do like the idea of rolling out cookies on parchment paper, taking away the excess and just sticking the parchment, with the cookies, on a sheet and put it in the oven, rather than handling the cookies so much.

 

Putting the pastry cloth in the freezer: Anyone may use that idea; I got it from someone else. In fact, there are people who just always store their pastrycloth in the freezer.

VicB213 Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 3:13pm

Don't you hate Friday when your brain does not engage... glad you got BBB... I use to work there and that is what I got in the habit of calling it... will have to retrain to write it out.

inspiredbymom Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 4:48pm

For cookies, I have even used chopsticks when I didn't have anything else around!  I just put two of them with the pointed sides side by side to keep the it the same height as the flat part.  It worked in a pinch and I had tons of them to put around the dough!  I also use wax paper to roll/cool dough and then cut them out when they are set.  I bake on parchment though.  I love my pastry cloths for pie dough and have several on hand for busy days!  Also, if you go the lumber yard instead of a hobby shop, you can find longer lengths of square stock in the millwork section.  I also had a lady in one of our sugar classes use a LARGE pvc pipe as a rolling pin.  You can make them as long as you like.  Since I always have a top sheet of wax paper on top of my cookies, I think that I would not mind trying it for larger areas that my big fondant roller don't cover.  

MsMonica Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 4:59pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter 

Maybe:

http://www.armchair.com/store/gourmet/baking/rollingpin.html

 

That is where I ordered from. Never have before but apparently their site isn't up to date. And they mentioned having computer problems which kind of sounded like someone doesn't know how to process the online orders. They asked me what I had ordered and then mentioned they are no longer making it. They sold the stock they had and the couple that was making them stopped making them. So they are in process of making a similar version which is supposed to be out in a few months and they'd call me then to see if i'd be interested in purchasing. I wish their site had all that info to begin with! I was so excited to buy it finally! In the meantime, I'm thinking of just making my own! LOL...Large pastry board and attaching slats or dowels to it. Square dowels that is. LOL.

Dayti Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 6:51pm

I have a few friends who swear by one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Adjustable-Rolling-Pin-Green/dp/B001VC4PW0

It's 16 1/2" long.

LKing12 Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 7:11pm

I have different thickness of sticks about a foot long and place them on a silicone mat at two sides only.  The mat holds the sticks and I use the long fondant roller resting on both sides on top of the sticks.  Excellent results.  The silicone mat is easier to clean than a dough board, cheese cloth or dough cloth.

You could achieve different thicknesses by stacking flat rulers on top of each other.

MsMonica Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 7:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKing12 

I have different thickness of sticks about a foot long and place them on a silicone mat at two sides only.  The mat holds the sticks and I use the long fondant roller resting on both sides on top of the sticks.  Excellent results.  The silicone mat is easier to clean than a dough board, cheese cloth or dough cloth.

You could achieve different thicknesses by stacking flat rulers on top of each other.

 Like the blue ateco mat? I have that. Maybe I'll use that. 

MsMonica Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 7:53pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti 

I have a few friends who swear by one of these: http://www.amazon.com/Joseph-Adjustable-Rolling-Pin-Green/dp/B001VC4PW0

It's 16 1/2" long.

I thought about purchasing this before I ordered the Dobord. I saw it at JCPenney. Only thing I'm afraid of with that is that it doesn't have handles like a regular rolling pin. At this point I don't care anymore. Lol. I just finished a big cookie order & now I'm onto my sisters baby shower! The family keeps me busy. Lol

-K8memphis Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 8:50pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsMonica 

I thought about purchasing this before I ordered the Dobord. I saw it at JCPenney. Only thing I'm afraid of with that is that it doesn't have handles like a regular rolling pin. At this point I don't care anymore. Lol. I just finished a big cookie order & now I'm onto my sisters baby shower! The family keeps me busy. Lol

 

 

i think this rolling pin is the bombshabomb--it's the best of the dobord world imo

 

because with the dobord you gotta wiggly around with the paper or foil on the top of the db and it's much easier to roll out on the table/counter top

 

and if i used my silicone mat under there i'd cut it and i'd have to hurt something :) again :{

 

one of the screws is stripped on my db and removing the inner board to line it all up is pain--too fiddly--four thicknesses on this fiddly one

 

and mine was only $65 too

 

i use that pin with my dough onto parchment or foil--do my cut outs and remove the excess--bake on that same paper/foil--easy peasy

 

and don't worry about not having handles--you only gotta do two or three swipes with the pin and you got it-

you kinda feel guilty not having to mess around with it more -- 'wait--we're there already??  icon_biggrin.gif that was too easy' you'll think!!!

 

you can let your dough get nice & work-ably soft and not have to arm wrestle it to get it rolled out

 

it's not like rolling fondant without handles--that would be hellish torture

 

i don't think you could be disappointed with this pin and you'll be be eighty bucks richer!!!

 

if those nice thickness guides fall off or you loose one--getcha some rulers!!!!

MsMonica Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 8:58pm

SOLD! lol. I was thinking it'd be like my fondant roller. That IS hellish! 

{on my way to JCP!} 

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