homecake Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:00pm
post #1 of

Hi all

I have been baking for a while now but just started decorating about a year ago, the problem o question I have is...how do you all get your buttercream soooo white???icon_eek.gif

 Mine is always yellowish or cream in colour, I know this is because of the butter that I use but I have never seen white butter! do you use something else in it or add white colouring??

Btw Im not from USA so please dont tell me I need to use crisco LOL icon_wink.gif I see this in lots of recipes etc but havent been able to find it in Ireland

Thans in advance icon_biggrin.gif

27 replies
Annabakescakes Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:04pm
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AThe very whites are made with crisco, sorry! Or any solid white vegetable shortening, I suppose. You can make yours a little whiter by adding a tiny dab of violet color to it, there is white food color that is titanium dioxide, and also clear vanilla will help!

BakingIrene Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:08pm
post #3 of

Can you buy undyed margarine locally?  in Canada it used to come with small patches of the yellow colour, so that you could have it white if you wanted. 

 

Margarine has more or less the same water content as butter--you make a direct replacement for butter, weight for weight.

 

Vegetable shortening comes by different names.

homecake Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:09pm
post #4 of

Thanks Annabakescakes

if I mixed my butter with a veg shortening would it change the flavour much or just make it milder?? Ive been using the same brand for a long time for its taste everyone comments on the taste of my btc thumbs_up.gif

homecake Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:15pm
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Hi BakingIrene thanks

I dont think Ive ever seen undied margerine but will def have a look for it :)

Annabakescakes Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:44pm
post #6 of

A

Original message sent by homecake

Thanks Annabakescakes if I mixed my butter with a veg shortening would it change the flavour much or just make it milder?? Ive been using the same brand for a long time for its taste everyone comments on the taste of my btc ;-D

It will make it a bit milder, but I prefer it. If you don't want the taste to change, the titanium dioxide is the best bet. But as long as you use brown vanilla and real butter, it won't be white white. I think it's a good trade-off, myself! I would rather have mine a bit yellow and flavorful, than white and tasteless.

If you use several coats of buttercream, you could use your yummy buttercream as a base coat, and a whiter one as a final coat.

homecake Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:52pm
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Thank you very much, I appreciate the help :)

Dayti Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 9:27pm
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Trex is the UK and Irish equivalent of Crisco, it's in the supermarket. Or you can probably buy Crisco from Amazon or somewhere.
 

homecake Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 11:58pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti 

Trex is the UK and Irish equivalent of Crisco, it's in the supermarket. Or you can probably buy Crisco from Amazon or somewhere.
 

Thanks Dayti but Im in Ireland :)

ellavanilla Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 12:57am

I use Italian Mousseline Buttercream. It's slightly off-white, but I think it's fine for a wedding cake. Actually, I find that adding the regular vanilla tempers the color of the butter a bit and makes it look a little whiter. 

 

I use the leftover yolks for chocolate buttercream.

mariel9898 Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:11am

Try adding a drop (and I do mean a drop!) of blue color to your icing. Mix well. You may not get the very white color you get with shortening, but it will be whiter.
 

kikiandkyle Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:45am

I think Frytex is the Irish equivalent. It's with the solid fats in the supermarket.

carmijok Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:48am

The difference between butter and shortening is not only in taste, but in texture.  It doesn't melt in your mouth and just doesn't taste as rich,  IMO.  I use a mix of butter and cream cheese for my buttercream, which is wonderful but it too, is not white-white.  

 

Normally this is not really a problem, but recently I made a cake with fondant snowflakes and I really wanted it to be white so I got to thinking...I use thin layers of highly  colored frosting to cover the regular buttercream on my colored cakes...why not make a white frosting and use a couple of thin layer of that?

 

So because I don't use shortening I mixed cream cheese and powdered sugar to a frosting consistency and spread it on in two thin layers over my regular buttercream which I had gotten cold and hard in the fridge.  It worked great and because it had cream cheese in it, the flavor blended well with the regular BC..in fact you really could not taste the difference and it gave me the white color I was looking for. HTH!

rosiecake Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 3:22am

AIf you use full fat butter it can be quite yellow. Try using a low fat butter. A farmer said its what the cows eat that determine how yellow it is. You have to find the right brand, my cake supplier in Sydney knows a particular brand, which ofcorse I've forgotten.

rosiecake Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 3:25am

AI'm a h

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

The very whites are made with crisco, sorry! Or any solid white vegetable shortening, I suppose. You can make yours a little whiter by adding a tiny dab of violet color to it, there is white food color that is titanium dioxide, and also clear vanilla will help!

I'm a hairdresser by trade, we make bleached yellow hair white by adding violet/purple toner, so this makes total sense lol :)

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 4:37am

I make BC with all butter (yellow and full fat) and bourbon vanilla. 

 

I add in a few scant drops of violet gel/paste color and I get a lovely white BC with no change in flavor or consistency.  Such an easy fix.

 

Rae

homecake Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:34pm

Thank you very much all, very sweet to take the time to reply, and have given me a lot to think about and loads of new things to try icon_biggrin.gif

mariel9898 Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 5:00pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosiecake 

If you use full fat butter it can be quite yellow. Try using a low fat butter. A farmer said its what the cows eat that determine how yellow it is. You have to find the right brand, my cake supplier in Sydney knows a particular brand, which ofcorse I've forgotten.

 

True, ever notice how organic butter tends to be more yellow in the summer? Regular commercial butter does also, but the difference is less noticeable.

 

Wilton makes something called White-White icing color which they say is for making butter based icings whiter. Americolor makes something similar. Has anyone tried either?

carmijok Posted 4 Feb 2013 , 10:53pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mariel9898 

 

True, ever notice how organic butter tends to be more yellow in the summer? Regular commercial butter does also, but the difference is less noticeable.

 

Wilton makes something called White-White icing color which they say is for making butter based icings whiter. Americolor makes something similar. Has anyone tried either?

Yes I have and it changes the taste of your frosting--and I don't care for the color it makes...almost like spackling  compound...not a pretty clean white.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 4 Feb 2013 , 11:23pm

I'm definitely with "Annabakescakes" on this one: I use all butter, and all real vanilla, and let the color be what it is. If I'm doing maple or maple-cinnamon buttercream, I do it with real Vermont B (for the robustness; any of the A grades would get lost in all the powdered sugar!), and for strawberry, I use strawberry jam (along with a bit of strawberry extract). I haven't yet gotten to the point of grinding my own cinnamon, though, although back in first or second grade, I once participated in a class exercise of churning our own butter.

denetteb Posted 4 Feb 2013 , 11:53pm

I use a recipe from the Wilton forums, it uses an even mix of butter and shortening.  The first step is to beat the two together for 6-7 minutes, just let it run with the stand mixer.    It turns them  white.  I have no idea why/how that happens, but it does.  Might be something you could try with your recipe.

lorieleann Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 2:28am

how long are you beating your butter?  I know that the longer I beat the butter it seems that the butter lightens up.  I wonder if beating longer would help, or if there is just a point where it is too yellow to lighten up enough. 

denetteb Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 4:23am

Here is a link where there is the recipe and a number of followup questions and answers about the recipe.
http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=7&threadid=132579
The butter and shortening are beaten for 7-8 minutes on a KA speed 6 or 4 if using a beater blade. 

homecake Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 10:29am
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann 

how long are you beating your butter?  I know that the longer I beat the butter it seems that the butter lightens up.  I wonder if beating longer would help, or if there is just a point where it is too yellow to lighten up enough. 

I do beat it for a VERY long time ( i have never act timed it) but I like my btc quite fluffy, its just the butter I buy is pure yellow, this does not bother me for filling in cakes etc but as sometimes I find royal icing a bit hard to work with I was wondering how so many got their btc so white when mine is always yellow, I reallu dont want to change my recipe as it is very nice and tasty so I will try some of the suggestions about adding violet etc, ty :)

Annabakescakes Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 5:18pm

A

Original message sent by hbquikcomjamesl

I'm definitely with "Annabakescakes" on this one: I use all butter, and all real vanilla, and let the color be what it is. If I'm doing maple or maple-cinnamon buttercream, I do it with real Vermont B (for the robustness; any of the A grades would get lost in all the powdered sugar!), and for strawberry, I use strawberry jam (along with a bit of strawberry extract). I haven't yet gotten to the point of grinding my own cinnamon, though, although back in first or second grade, I once participated in a class exercise of churning our own butter.

we churned butter in the 2nd grade at Sopori Elementary School in Amado, Arizona. I loved doing it and it is a strong memory! We used tinker toys for the paddle and a small coffee can with a hole in the lid. When we were done, we spread on saltine crackers, and it was gross! Lol, the teacher said it needed salt. I have talked about it several times over the last 25 years and and no one I know did that exercise, funny you did, too!

AZCouture Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 5:22pm

Amado huh? That's an area of AZ I haven't explored much. That and the Northeastern part. Is it pretty? Looks like it's higher elevation desert like Tucson?

AZCouture Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 5:24pm

When I need "white as possible" SMBC, I just don't add any vanilla. And it does *not* taste like a stick of butter. I know some do, but not mine...yummy.

Annabakescakes Posted 5 Feb 2013 , 5:42pm

A

Original message sent by AZCouture

Amado huh? That's an area of AZ I haven't explored much. That and the Northeastern part. Is it pretty? Looks like it's higher elevation desert like Tucson?

I It is so beautiful! Natural Rick formations and cliffs and things. I remember when I was riding in the car with my grandma, she pointed out the sky was blue that if she were paint the exact color if it in one of her paintings, no one would believe her! I was born in Tucson, at Pima Co. Hospital. My grandpa was an engineer at Chamberlain, in the Mexico side of Nogales. (Which was a ghetto back then, even.)

Oh, and to stay on track, I have used Americolor's white icing color in my fondant successfully, but not so much in my buttercream.

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