Iloveweddings Posted 1 Feb 2013 , 1:48pm
post #1 of

I pretty much said it all in my subject. Just looking for natural preservative for cookies going on a long trip. Thanks. 

14 replies
Dayti Posted 1 Feb 2013 , 2:06pm
post #2 of

What kind of cookies are they? Sugar and fat go a long way in preserving cookies. If they are well wrapped, regular sugar cookies or choc chip cookies last for ages.
 

BakingIrene Posted 1 Feb 2013 , 2:11pm
post #3 of

What's a "long trip"?

CWR41 Posted 1 Feb 2013 , 5:28pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene 

What's a "long trip"?


It's in the title... "overseas".

jason_kraft Posted 1 Feb 2013 , 6:35pm
post #5 of

AShipping overseas can take as little as 1 day up to 2 weeks or more depending on destination and shipping method.

Iloveweddings Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 6:40am
post #6 of

Overseas to our troops as well as to some friends in the UK. I would feel better if I was using some kind of natural preservative. 

 

No one knows of any?

Sassyzan Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 7:10am
post #7 of

ASugar cookies decorated with royal icing will last for weeks just wrapped in cellophane bags. No preservatives necessary. Many other cookies will last a long time too. http://www.marthastewart.com/275271/best-cookie-recipes-for-shipping/@center/276951/christmas-cookies http://allrecipes.com/howto/mailing-cookies/ http://www.landolakes.com/TestKitchen/TipsAndTechniques/FAQ/homemadetreats.aspx

Relznik Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 8:20am
post #8 of

I made some cookies for my cousin's son's baby naming ceremony.

 

I'm in the UK, they're in Canada.

 

It must have been a good 2 or possibly even 3 weeks from when I made them to when they were eaten and my aunt said they were beautiful and you'd never have known they weren't made the day before!

 

Each cookie was covered with sugarpaste (fondant) and placed in a cellophane bag which I tied with curling ribbon.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Suzanne x
 

Iloveweddings Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 9:02am
post #9 of

Thanks for all of your responses. I get that the cookies will probably be perfectly fine but the people who get them might be scared to eat them. If you sent a store bought cookie all would feel fine about it. So, is it just a waste to make them? Do you know what I mean?

Relznik Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 9:27am

I think if you plant a seed of doubt in their mind, they might be scared to try them.

 

But if you don't say anything, I don't think it will cross their mind!! icon_wink.gificon_biggrin.gif
 

Annabakescakes Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 9:32am

ASugar is a natural preservative. I just looked up Oreos, Nilla wafers, animal crackers, and found a link to every Girl Scout cookie ingredient, http://s3.amazonaws.com/www.littlebrownie.com/downloads/NutritionInfo.pdf and none if them say (a preservative) or (to preserve freshness) like many other foods will. The sugar is the preservative. Or the high fructose corn syrup, or hydrogenated oils that they all seem to have.

Sassyzan Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 12:35pm

AIf someone mailed me a cookie, I'd eat it! I don't thin I'd even think twice about preservatives, and I don't think it having preservatives in it would make me feel safer eating it. I don't think you'd be wasting your time. I think it's a nice gesture.

Iloveweddings Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 2:58pm

I feel confident about it, I just want them to be enjoyed.  :)

jason_kraft Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 4:12pm

ATBHQ is a commonly used preservative in food (including girl scout cookies).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tert-Butylhydroquinone

Soy lecithin is also used often as both an emulsifier and a preservative.

BakingIrene Posted 2 Feb 2013 , 4:48pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iloveweddings 

I pretty much said it all in my subject. Just looking for natural preservative for cookies going on a long trip. Thanks. 

No preservatives whatsoever are required when you bake cookies that are rich in fat. Butter, margarine, shortening all work.

 

I used to bake hundreds of shortbread and refrigerator cookies at the beginning of December, that were stored in airtight cookie tins in a cool basement.  They were just like fresh baked when they were served over extended holidays that lasted from December 24 to January 19. 

 

So unless you are sending your parcel by dog sled or canoe, there is no reason to be concerned.  Wrap the cookies well into plastic wrap so they survive the mechanical shaking they will get from a commercial delivery service. Homemade cookies get gobbled down to the last crumb.

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