LovelyCakes4Us Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:55am
post #1 of

ASo I'm having a bit of trouble trying to explain to potential customers "why" my cakes are priced "high" I don't want to come off rude what so ever. So when you get that question ( 115.00 for a two tier, that's a lot of money for JUST a cake!!!!" what do you send in response?

I was in a consultation with a bride the other day who wanted a three tier cake that serves 300 guest for-wait for it, wait for it... 150.00!!! I must had to hold back all kinds of words I was going to say to her! But of course I kept it professional..

19 replies
jason_kraft Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 6:17am
post #2 of

AOne of the first questions to ask before you sit with a potential customer for a consultation is their budget, along with how many servings they want. If the top of their budget is below your minimum price, it saves everyone time if you tell them up front that you won't be able to meet their requirements and stay within their budget.

I've found that the best response to someone asking why your cakes are so expensive is to be honest and explain that the price is based on ingredient costs, labor costs, and overhead costs. If they want a cheaper cake, they will need to compromise on the quality of the ingredients or the complexity of their design (or both).

If you find that the majority of your potential customers are questioning your price or can't afford your cakes, that's an indication that you need to revisit your marketing strategy.

Annabakescakes Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 6:27am
post #3 of

AI don't know of any 3 tier to serve 300, a 6,8,10,12,14,16 will serve 306. I suppose you could do a 14, 16, 18, but don't tell AZCouture about it ;-)

Anyway, I hear it all the time too. I ask over the phone or email, depending on how they get a hold of me, about serving count, and say, "A cake that size will have a price range of $900 to $1200, depending on your design, is that within your budget?" Before I ever have them out for a consultation. I am sick of the brides who waste my time with a tasting when their budget is only home made friendly.

And the ones who are rude enough to ask why it is so expensive, I tell them that it is not just cake, it is edible art, and I understand that not everyone's budget will allow for it, and Walmart can always have a sheet cake ready for them.

jason_kraft Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 6:33am
post #4 of

AFor 300 guests I would recommend a smaller 3 tier cake (e.g. 8/10/12) with kitchen cakes making up the remaining servings. Many customers are way off on how many servings they think make up different cake sizes.

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 6:47am
post #5 of

AI do ask via email or phone what their budget is before we start chatting, this bride however was a bit of a pain. She insisted we meet in person so we can discuss things then and there. I second guessed this over five times but went ahead and did it anyways. I normally put my foot down, good learning step.

Does anyone have an exact letter I could email with detailed explanation?

jason_kraft Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 6:51am
post #6 of

A

Original message sent by LovelyCakes4Us

Does anyone have an exact letter I could email with detailed explanation?

You don't need a detailed explanation, just tell her what your minimum price is (and what that price is based on in general). If she can increase her budget that's great, otherwise you can simply wish her the best of luck with her wedding.

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 7:17am
post #7 of

A[quote name="jason_kraft" url="/t/753461/why-are-your-cakes-so-expensive-hmm-well-see-the-thing-is#post_7352904"] You don't need a detailed explanation]

Sorry Jason I guess i wasn't clear, I've seen set examples to send in reply when there are negative situations from other posters, I am having a hard time finding them now unfortunately. I have a bit of a hard time wording things sometimes, so a pacific message I could copy/paste would be lovely.

SugaredSaffron Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 8:55am
post #8 of

The ones who insist they speak about it in the consulations are the one with a limited budget, they hope to win you around with their amazing charm and charisma. Its probably in some wedding magazine advice column somewhere.
 

nhbaker Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 2:34pm
post #9 of

Don't know if this will help you or not but I just had a bride want to negiotiate a price so I sent her this (the wording I found here on cc):

 

"I understand that budgeting for a wedding can be a challenge. However, my pricing reflects the large amount of time and skill it takes to design and execute a delicious work of art. I stand firm on my prices for that reason. Perhaps you could consider going with a smaller cake/serving count which will decrease your cost."

 

Another thing I do sometimes when I get price inquiries is include these two links to ariticles in Debi Brim's blog.  I find them helpful (and hilarious) and may hopefully get these brides get their heads out of the clouds

 

 
-K8memphis Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 3:45pm

what i do is get the restaurant dessert prices in your locality for a slice of cake

 

here it's from $3.50 to $8 a pop

 

i say if you got dessert for 100 friends at the (name it) fancy $8 place it's $800 and

 

if you take them to the (name it) fried chicken joint it's still $350 to serve those friends

 

naming the places makes it a fact and a reality

 

this is being delivered to your location pinpoint fresh quality, artistically designed and tailored to your specifications

 

if you went to $3.50 or $8 place they can only serve you the desserts on the menu

 

the cake has a two fold purpose it's not just dessert it's the focal point of the reception etc etc

 

(somewhere during the consult i also say the cake is a reflection of the bride)

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:18pm

A"I understand that budgeting for a wedding can be a challenge. However, my pricing reflects the large amount of time and skill it takes to design and execute a delicious work of art. I stand firm on my prices for that reason. Perhaps you could consider going with a smaller cake/serving count which will decrease your cost.

That is exactly what I am looking for thank you! Also the links you have up are not linking me to the site, it may be because I am using my cell phone.

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:21pm

A[quote name="

(somewhere during the consult i also say the cake is a reflection of the bride) [/quote]

LOVE THIS!

samcoul Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:21pm

Great response to show the prices at local places they would know!  I also like your comment about a reflection of the bride.  If she is being cheap about the cake it will sometimes show that they are that way, however, a simple elegant cake can be beautiful and not cost a lot in comparison to other custom made things.  (Not that you would said this to her but does she really think that a designer would make her a top quality fabric, one-of-a-kind gown for the price of a David Bridals sales rack special?!?!?)

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:23pm

A

Original message sent by SugaredSaffron

The ones who insist they speak about it in the consulations are the one with a limited budget, they hope to win you around with their amazing charm and charisma. Its probably in some wedding magazine advice column somewhere.

 

I'm now realizing this and using it as a learning step, big waste of time and money on my part!

costumeczar Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:45pm

If someone's nervy enough to ask why the cake is so expensive I tell them that you're not just paying for the cake, you're paying for the time and skill it takes to make it and make it look right.

 

I did a huge cake for a plumber's union once, and they were all making cracks about how much it cost and how they were in the wrong business. I told them "Since you're all union guys you'll probably understand when you think that you're not paying for the cake, you're paying for the skill." They all shut up and said "oh...yeah..." Then they really shut up when I told them that they could all come over to my house and wash my cake pans if they really wanted to change businesses.

nhbaker Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:45pm

I fixed the links - they should work now

Annabakescakes Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 4:46pm

AI have had several people come for a consultation and then tell me later that they are getting the cake from some aunt or cousin or friend of the MIL.... They knew they were getting the cake for free before they came to me and wasted my time and money and energy. I am seriously thinking of charging again, but no one else around here does it... It is such a conundrum!

AZCouture Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 5:05pm

Ha ha....yeah. That would be slightly squatty. There goes that "s" word again. icon_rolleyes.gif

-K8memphis Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 5:31pm

<sad squeaky violin music plays>

 

heavy headed bulbous bulked up cakes not proper for the pinnacle

 

doomed to slug/slosh through life craving cover 

 

like so many saddle bagged fat photosensitive squatapotamus'

 

<shudder>

 

<lights fade>

 

<a herd of hooves are heard slowly sadly fading into the distance>

 

(i been wanting to use my new word ;)

 

icon_lol.gif

 

~~just being silly~~

and yes maybe not the first choice/best top tier size but...

 

great new word though

cakeyouverymuch Posted 27 Jan 2013 , 6:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

I have had several people come for a consultation and then tell me later that they are getting the cake from some aunt or cousin or friend of the MIL.... They knew they were getting the cake for free before they came to me and wasted my time and money and energy. I am seriously thinking of charging again, but no one else around here does it... It is such a conundrum!

 

Could you not apply a charge for the consultation/tasting which will be applied to the cost of the cake if they eventually book with you?  That way those who book with you are actually not paying for their consult/tasting and the ones who want to waste your time are paying for the priviledge and the ones who want free cake will go bother someone else.

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