Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 8:43pm
post #1 of

Hello! My bride is looking for a cake like below for 100-125 people. I'm clueless were to begin. I haven't seen a spring form bigger than 12" and are the servings same as cake? I need to give her a quote by tomorrow at the latest and really need some advice on how to meet her servings needed.

 

 

29 replies
-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 8:46pm
post #2 of

just one tier?

Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 8:48pm
post #3 of

Is it even possible? She said just like the picture. any recommendations?

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 8:49pm
post #4 of

is that just cake

 

or cheesecake?

 

what are you making?

 

a 125 serving big flat cake ain't gonna be that pretty necessarily strawberries & chocolate or not

 

geez the 'squat police' are gonna be writing tickets left & right about this one icon_lol.gif

VicB213 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 8:49pm
post #5 of

How about one "large" masterpiece and then smaller individual cakes for the guest... that to me seems reasonable and managable...

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 8:51pm
post #6 of

sure an 18 inch cake

 

done

Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 8:53pm
post #7 of

Its cheesecake not cake. I could do a 12" cake as the show cake and then make enough for the remaining servings separately?

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:02pm
post #8 of

me--i would recommend spiffing it up with strawberry blossoms and tendrils and get the bride & groom strawberries up higher

 

make it look even more graduated--the picture def shows it looking graduated up higher in the middle

 

i'd do the whole 18 inch

 

you don't have to bake cheesecake in a spring form

 

i'd get the 18 inch half pans bake two and slide them together

 

dang that's gonna be heavy!!

 

my arms hurt already

 

icon_biggrin.gif

 

i think i'd apply all berries on site maybe

VicB213 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:02pm
post #9 of

Using that train of thought seems to be the most realistic to me...

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:03pm

cheesecake often gets a smaller serving size though

 

can't remember how big

 

must check w/wilton

Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:09pm

K8 that does sound do-able! The only concern I had is getting the cheesecake out of a non spring foam pan. any idea's on that?

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:17pm

oh sure

 

i usually bake mine with a cardboard circle under it and aluminum foil or parchment in between that & the cheesecake

 

in this case a half cardboard circle for the half pan

 

it just ensures that it will definitely fall out no problem-o

 

to have even more insurance--fold a long strip of foil or parchment  like a ribbon and lay it down first so it is under everything so it crosses the bottom of the pan and the ends hang out & up over the sides and you have a for sure little pull tab--not essential but nice if it's your first few this size

 

cheesecakes freeze brilliantly

 

freeze

 

pop it out

 

away you go

 

i worked for this one place and she would not let me freeze the cheesecake

 

dumb dumb dumb and we were doing two layer cheescake tiers

 

still upset about that apparently ;)

 

but they just sound spooky--easy peasy!

Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:23pm

Thank you so much for taking the time to really explain everything!

 

So take the 1/2 pan and make a 1/2 circle of cardboard and place the cardboard template in the pan then put aluminum or parchment over my cardboard template and pour in the cheesecake and bake?

 

Also If my recipe works for a 9" pan how would I convert that for an 18" pan? I was thinking multiply it by 5 but I'm just pulling that out of the air lol

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:31pm

yes and don't forget the crust in there somewhere too icon_biggrin.gif

 

 

let's see you need to decide how tall you want this

 

like new york tall or like bavarian short or in between

 

new york bakes low & slow bavarian bakes hot & fast

 

you could use anywhere from 10-20 cups of batter in each half give or take

 

i'd say you gotta do some math here then divide it by 2--for each pan

 

a full 18" layer gets 18 cups of batter but cheesecake doesn't rise like cake

 

so several variables to consider

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:31pm

oh and check if half pan fits in oven!!!

 

that's the biggie!!!

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:38pm

you could do a two layer cheesecake too

 

if baking a tall one is daunting

 

you can bake one with and one without the crust

 

and just stack them up--ganache in between

 

charge like crazy for the expertise

Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:38pm

Ha lol I yes cant forget the crust!

 

I'm definitely going with a New York style. I need a math expert for sure I'm not positive but a 9" recipe has roughly 3 cups?

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:47pm

a 9" cake cake uses 5 cups batter

 

use an instant read thermometer for testing doneness

 

don't do any of that leave the oven door open for two hours while it cools

 

that's why two layers is nice sometimes--hot & fast

 

because you're baking a behemoth eighteen inches long and only nine inches deep but still use rose nails

 

cream cheese has a four hour shelf life outside the 40 degree chill box and the 140 degrees of heat (sorry i don't know the celcius)

 

but the four hours translates well--like say it's 20 minutes to buy it, drive it around in the shopping cart, read the magazines in the check out, get it home, bring in the groceries, get it in the chillbox so now you got 3 hours 40 left

 

be super vigilant

 

hey does an 18 inch cake fit in your refrigerator??

Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:52pm

Ok maybe I should really think on which recipe to use and if i want to stack them. I have professional appliances but I will definitely go home and measure before I make any commitments!

 

9"=5 cups really? This is making my brain hurt!!!! And I still have to price the dang thing!

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:54pm

do rose mails react in cheesecake??

 

maybe use aluminum foil--cheesecake is self repairing--no worries

 

 

I use a piece of folded aluminum foil with a tear there on the one end & the little legs bent in opposite directions so it will stand up--I put one or more in my cakes instead of baking cores and rose nails--so the bigger cakes can bake off better--They remove easy peasy--just slide a knife down each side and wiggle it out--the knife unfolds the little feet & it just slides right out.

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 9:57pm

you made the mistake of thanking me for being detailed icon_lol.gif

 

but yeah--while it seems pretty straightforward

 

it's a boat load of planning

 

thanks for letting me help plan a bit too much  icon_biggrin.gif

 

but srsly thank you!

 

that was fun

Ali3971 Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 10:07pm

No way you have been an amazing help to me! One last question and I promise I will leave you alone. What would you charge for this?

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 10:18pm

fresh strawberries and cheesecake

 

hmm

 

and the chocolate plates around the perimeter too and those have decor on them

 

you buy those decorative sheets but you still have to cast the choco

 

just off top of my head not doing any math--$12 per serving sounds respectable

 

but i'd have no qualms going higher after i crunched numbers

 

all that strawberry work is last minute of course

 

no other big cakes that morning

 

shopping, chopping & dipping at the last possible moment to keep the strawberries pretty

 

after i think about it a while i think i'm low but i'd start there

-K8memphis Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 10:28pm

$12-15 minimum

 

and you can make the swirl on the panels with the white & brown choco you will be dipping with

 

don't need to buy the decorative stuff

ellavanilla Posted 23 Jan 2013 , 11:45pm

Can I ask a question? You're doing a rectangular cake so that you will have enough servings? Why not do a tiered cake? Is the bride just against it?

 

I have baked an 16 inch round for stacking.  I use a 3 inch round pan, spray it with oil and then line it with waxed paper. I don't put any crust on it until after it's baked and set. That way I can build the crust up to a completely flat edge, then put the cardboard round on and flip. 

 

I don't use a nail, I use a bain marie so that the outside stays cool long enough for the inside to bake.

 

There is a cake on my profile that is a 16/10/8/6. The bride wanted the bottom wider for flowers.

 

Jen

Dayti Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 12:01am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellavanilla  I don't put any crust on it until after it's baked and set. That way I can build the crust up to a completely flat edge, then put the cardboard round on and flip. 

 

 

What do you stick the crust to the baked cheesecake with?

Ali3971 Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 9:29pm

Thanks again! I felt confident with my quote I gave her thanks to your help and advice.

 

ellavanilla- how do you stick the crust to the cheesecake? Can you describe how you form the crust to fit your cheesecake after the fact?

-K8memphis Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 9:52pm

you are very welcome

costumeczar Posted 24 Jan 2013 , 11:07pm

A[quote name="Ali3971" url="/t/753317/cheescake-wedding-help#post_7351708"]Hello! My bride is looking for a cake like below for 100-125 people. I'm clueless were to begin. I haven't seen a spring form bigger than 12" and are the servings same as cake? I need to give her a quote by tomorrow at the latest and really need some advice on how to meet her servings

Sorry for the stupid formatting, I don't know what I did when I quoted your post. I don't know if this would be helpful, but I have a new 16" pan with a removable bottom that's for making cheesecakes, and I don't need it. I was going to take it to goodwill but if you want it you can have it if you pay for the shipping. PM me if you think you can use it.

ellavanilla Posted 26 Jan 2013 , 12:18am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali3971 

Thanks again! I felt confident with my quote I gave her thanks to your help and advice.

 

ellavanilla- how do you stick the crust to the cheesecake? Can you describe how you form the crust to fit your cheesecake after the fact?

 

first, i bake the cake as tall as possible, so that i get 3 inch tiers, I make the usual cracker/butter mixture and fill in the top of the pan . be sure to pack the cracker into all the nooks so it creates that smooth edge. then pop it in the fridge until its firm. run a blade around the inside of the pan and warm the bottom so that it releases. put the round on the bottom and flip. if I haven't used enough butter, there can be some loose spillage. but i simply scoop it with an offset spatula back into place and then follow with my crumb coat right away. 

 

it can be messy and I haven't perfected it yet, but I prefer that to having tiers which are built up with frosting to be the correct height,

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