tsal Posted 22 Dec 2012 , 6:26pm
post #1 of

I have been a loyal Satin Ice user despite having issues with it because it is the only fondant that I can buy locally at a reasonable price.  I hate the bubbles that form after I cover a cold cake, and I hate the chemical smell.  All of my cakes looked fantastic though despite those issues.  I tend to preface any of my cakes with 'feel free to peel off the fondant - I won't be insulted'.  I'm a hobbyist so I'm usually invited to the events that my cakes are at.

 

While at a cake show, I bought a tub of FondX.  Smells ok and tastes better than Satin Ice.  It is soft just out of the tub and much easier to knead.  However, opening the @#$! tub is another story.  Holy back strain, Batman!  HATE the tub.  H.A.T.E.  Did I mention I hate it?

 

I used it on my son's carved ambulance cake (not in my gallery because it was embarrassingly badly done - carved cakes are not my forte and thank God he's only 4 and thought it was the most amazing thing ever).  It went on smoothly and no issues in that regard.

 

Fast forward a few weeks later and I decided to use the remainder of the tub on my mother's Xmas cake (not in gallery yet because it's not completely finished).   It was harder to knead which leads me to think that the tub didn't keep it as fresh as it could have (even though I still had trouble opening the blasted tub), and it dried out rather quickly while I was working it on the cake.  Luckily, I was able to mask mostly everything with reindeer and Xmas trees given the cake design.

 

Anyone else work with both Satin Ice and FondX and prefer one to the other?

20 replies
savannahquinn Posted 23 Dec 2012 , 2:37am
post #2 of

I recently bought a tub of white fondx for a customer who wanted a pure white cake. I usually use fondarific but it is so expensive.  Didn't love it, thought it dried too quickly and there were slight cracking. Fandarific never cracks...it's so soft...sometimes too soft.... But I would definitely use it again. 

tsal Posted 23 Dec 2012 , 10:30am
post #3 of

AI am going to try Fondarific next.

DianeLM Posted 23 Dec 2012 , 1:59pm
post #4 of

I've been a loyal FondX user for years.  I absolutely HATE Satin Ice white! 

 

First, opening the bucket.  Get yourself one of these http://www.wheatgrasskits.com/account/images/image.img?picture.image.url=%2Ffiles%2F2545336%2Fuploaded%2FBucket-Wrench-Yellow-2.jpg.  If you're strong enough, you don't have to pop the holes on the sides of the lid.  Just go around the lid with the opener.

 

FondX is pretty soft.  A tip I learned from Leah is to mix a small amount of Wilton in to give it a little more body.  When I use FondX straight, I ALWAYS roll it around my rolling pin to transfer to the cake as opposed to lifting with my hands because it is so stretchy.  But, it smooths so nicely!!!

 

I've never had a problem with a texture change after storing, however, I just received a new bucket (ordered from Jesters) and the texture was terrible right from the start.  It was like Satin Ice.  No elasticity.  I haven't researched this anomoly yet.  I'll be very upset if FondX has changed their formula. :(  But, that sounds like the problem you were having with the remainder of your FondX.

Lorabell Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 2:48am
post #5 of

I love fondx!  One thing I've learned is never use cornstarch when rolling out fondant and never flip it.  I've never had trouble with it cracking.  Always use powdered sugar for rolling.

 

Yes, fondarific tastes great, but if you ever want to use it for a figure...it won't firm like tradtional fondants.

 

Just my opinion.

 

Happy Baking

Lori

Cakepro Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 2:57am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorabell 

I love fondx!  One thing I've learned is never use cornstarch when rolling out fondant and never flip it.  I've never had trouble with it cracking.  Always use powdered sugar for rolling.

 

Yes, fondarific tastes great, but if you ever want to use it for a figure...it won't firm like tradtional fondants.

 

Just my opinion.

 

Happy Baking

Lori

You might want to re-think you use of the words "always" and "never". :)  There are just too many ways to do things.

 

95% of the time, I roll FondX out on cornstarch (when it's a giant piece - larger than 26" and I will be flipping it onto a cake - I roll it out on shortening).  Because I live on the humid Gulf Coast, I NEVER use powdered sugar for rolling out fondant.  And I actually do mean NEVER.  :)

DianeLM Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:33pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorabell 

I love fondx!  One thing I've learned is never use cornstarch when rolling out fondant

And I use cornstarch exclusively. So, there ya have it! Funny how our experiences can be so vastly different. icon_smile.gif

DeliciousDesserts Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:41pm
post #8 of

AI love fondarific.

Between fondx & satin ice, I prefer satin ice. I had the same problem with fondx once it's open. Even the first use it seemed to dry faster than satin ice.

One of my mentors uses a combo of petinice & chocopan. I just can't get past petinice packaging. I really should try it. Maybe next supply purchase.

melanie-1221 Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:46pm
post #9 of

I have not had any luck with Fondx or Fondarific. Such bad luck that I gave away 5 buckets of Fondariffic that I had purchased. I did use up the Fondx but had issues with it drying as well.

I think everyone has their own expectations for a fondants performance.

So far Satin Ice is the easiest for me to work with and gives me the results I am looking for.

That being said, the person I gave the Fondarific to says it's the best fondant ever.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 3 Feb 2013 , 1:57pm

AGasp*

Wish I had been the recipient!

jemchina Posted 4 Feb 2013 , 1:49am

AI had the same exact experience. Purchased a tub at a Canada cake show. Thought the price was not to bad compared to retail. I hate it. I have almost used up the tub now,on three cakes. Each one of them had excessive stretching, tearing, and not to mention the bubbles forming from kneading. The first time I used shortening, the last two times, I used a combo of powdered sugar and cornstarch. I even watched the fondx YouTube video. The only thing I did different is, I probably rolled it out thinner than what it seemed on the video. Buti don't like a thick layer of fondant on my cakes, as most people don't even like the taste. I have used satin ice in the past, and found it easier to work with, but it does harden on the cake somewhat. On a good note, I mixed it with gumpaste for a figurine I made, and it worked very well. I will probably used the the leftover for this purpose and go back to my favorite fondant.

kitycat Posted 4 Feb 2013 , 3:32pm

AI tryed fondx first and just now bought satin ice and i prefer satin ice as far as taste and texture.

tsal Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 2:31pm

AAfter watching a Colette Peters course on Craftsy, I now want to try Massa Ticino. She swears by it but wow is it expensive! And I'm not sure that it's nut-safe (I know that there are no nuts in it, but it may be manufactured in a facility that produces but products). I'll have to do some research.

tsal Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 2:33pm

AThanks for the tip, DianeLM! I will look for one of those lid-opening thingies!

-K8memphis Posted 9 Feb 2013 , 3:00pm

tsal, you use less of the really expensive stuff--the massa collection & the american stuff--colette probably said that--but boy are they high performance

 

if you really wanna cut to the chase--that's the way to go!

 

but i usually use satin ice--fondant's not requested as much here--we like buttercream--but you can't get away from it for sculpting

 

you willl enjoy your purchase!

tsal Posted 10 Feb 2013 , 11:52pm

Thanks, K8Memphis! 

 

It's funny how everyone I know hates the way fondant tastes but they all want sculpted fondant cakes.  I would love to find a fondant that people actually like the taste of.

-K8memphis Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 12:07am

taste you can fix

 

but fondant just doesn't melt in your mouth

 

and that's what americans like about buttercream

 

and hate about fondant :)

 

i/we love crunchy petals made from fondant--anything dried is great candy

 

semi-soft covering on a cake???

 

ergh agh <cough> no gelatinous substances that do not dissolve on my tongue thanks anyway :)

-K8memphis Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 12:09am

but all that to say if you get the pricey stuff and get it rolled thin enough is does kinda mesh with the buttercream more/better to some degree

Rewolf399 Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 2:00am

I started off with the Duff Goldman fondant that you can buy in 2 lb tubs at the hobby stores and I liked the taste and the texture, it works great.  You do have to put it in the microwave on 30% power for 10 seconds per pound before kneeding it, and even then it takes a bit to get it pliable.  That being said, it is on the firm side but doesn't crack and is easy to smooth on a cake.

 

But, it is also very expensive, $20 for 2 pounds.  I started to look online for other fondants and tried Satin Ice next.  It was much softer, it rolled out much easier, but, it was also so easy to ding with a knuckle or rip when smoothing.  I certainly couldn't keep the same 1/8" thickness as the Duff Goldman fondant.  It tastes horrible IMO, and when it finally did harden it was like cardboard.

 

Next I tried Fondx and I have to say that I like the taste and it is nice and soft but not super sensitive.  When making figures it works best to mix in a little of the Duff Goldman or some gumpaste.

 

I really don't like the Wilton brand fondant, and it is expensive, tastes gross, and cracks easy.

 

I am going to have to try Fondarific, just to see how that goes.  I do a lot of the custom cakes, sculpted etc, so for me I'm trying to find the fine line between workability and price.
 

Cakepro Posted 11 Feb 2013 , 11:43pm

Duff's fondant is rebranded Fondarific.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rewolf399 

I started off with the Duff Goldman fondant that you can buy in 2 lb tubs at the hobby stores and I liked the taste and the texture, it works great.  You do have to put it in the microwave on 30% power for 10 seconds per pound before kneeding it, and even then it takes a bit to get it pliable.  That being said, it is on the firm side but doesn't crack and is easy to smooth on a cake.

 

But, it is also very expensive, $20 for 2 pounds.  I started to look online for other fondants and tried Satin Ice next.  It was much softer, it rolled out much easier, but, it was also so easy to ding with a knuckle or rip when smoothing.  I certainly couldn't keep the same 1/8" thickness as the Duff Goldman fondant.  It tastes horrible IMO, and when it finally did harden it was like cardboard.

 

Next I tried Fondx and I have to say that I like the taste and it is nice and soft but not super sensitive.  When making figures it works best to mix in a little of the Duff Goldman or some gumpaste.

 

I really don't like the Wilton brand fondant, and it is expensive, tastes gross, and cracks easy.

 

I am going to have to try Fondarific, just to see how that goes.  I do a lot of the custom cakes, sculpted etc, so for me I'm trying to find the fine line between workability and price.
 

Rewolf399 Posted 12 Feb 2013 , 12:16am

Thank you, that is good to know!
 

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