jlgpastry Posted 16 Dec 2012 , 1:35am
post #1 of

I work for a large restaurant and wedding reception venue. Does anyone know what the average commision should be if I sell and make all the cakes for my employer. I think the owner will offer me an hourly rate plus a commision on the cakes that i sell. About what should my commision be if I make the cakes with his ingredients in his kitchen?

3 replies
BakingIrene Posted 16 Dec 2012 , 2:02am
post #2 of

First of all remember that you do not have to give an immediate answer to any offer.  Politely say "I would like to think this over--may I call you tomorrow with my answer".

 

If you are already an employee of the venue, then you may not be entitled to anything more than a salary. If you end up making cakes for them fulltime, then you should not expect to be able to work fulltime at another position because there are all kinds of state laws against working more than a certain number of hours (regardless of overtime rates).

 

So you really need to clarify your total hours with this employer.  You will have to make sure that your agreement states that you are eligible for overtime. Check your state/provincial workplace laws. Get all of the details in writing.

 

A commission on custom orders would be difficult to define because your employer may calculate the commission on the wholesale price (significantly less $$$ than an outside bakery making the cake).  Better to ask for a good hourly salary because then the employer contributes to your government pension and unemployment insurance. 

Stitches Posted 17 Dec 2012 , 2:00am
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlgpastry 

I work for a large restaurant and wedding reception venue. Does anyone know what the average commission should be if I sell and make all the cakes for my employer. I think the owner will offer me an hourly rate plus a commission on the cakes that i sell. About what should my commission be if I make the cakes with his ingredients in his kitchen?

This is a little confusing. I take it that you do not normally work in the kitchen for this employer?

 

If you're using their ingredients baking in their kitchen, then your not an independent contractor, so you should be paid a decent hourly wage and be compensated with typical employee benefits.

 

I've worked for large venues as the Pastry Chef. I'd hire an assistant to do the cakes at $10.00 per hour and expect them to have a culinary degree plus experience decorating cakes. I've never seen anyone in the kitchen receive a commission for any work. If you can get it, great-take it. I'd doubt that it will last.

jason_kraft Posted 17 Dec 2012 , 3:40am
post #4 of

AYou may be better off negotiating a salary as an employee of the venue, especially if you can get benefits.

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