things NOT to ask/say to a baker!

Decorating By step0nmi Updated 11 Jan 2016 , 1:15am by Apti

SpeciallyYours Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 6:46pm
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Original message sent by nutcase68

Of course Girl scout cookies are made out of real girl scouts.  Ever notice they don't offer brownies??:wink:

ROFLMAO

SpeciallyYours Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 7:03pm
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Original message sent by costumeczar

If people say that send them the picture that goes with this article and tell them that just paying you the cost of the ingredients will get them this. [URL=http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2009/12/diy-not-so-fastpart-2.html]http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2009/12/diy-not-so-fastpart-2.html[/URL]

OMG...I LOVE this picture!! Too right!!!!:D

SpeciallyYours Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 7:06pm
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Original message sent by -K8memphis

lots of cakes are made with all purpose or self-rising or self-raising depending on which side of the pond --

factor in the whole international date line thing and some of them might be called already-been-raised...tomorrow  :D

:D

costumeczar Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 8:26pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl 

There's that. And it's certainly not inconceivable that there's a cake recipe that calls for bread flour, or perhaps even a stronger flour than ordinary bread flour.

 

I was, however, under the impression that most cake recipes called for something weaker than A.P. Like cake flour.

 

Of course, the closest I've ever come to baking a scratch cake, so far, was one time when I baked one from Bisquick (based on a recipe that, at least at the time, was on the box). So don't mind me; I'm just a ham-handed beginner.

To really give you a freakout, I couldn't find any cake flour in the stores this week, so I subbed AP flour for cake flour in the recipes that called for it and IT WORKED just fine...wooooooooooooo! You just have to use less, it's all a matter of gluten.

Petals_and_Pearls_cakes Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 9:29pm
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AI hate when people try to tell me how to make their cake when they have absoloutley no idea about cake decorating! " I would like the fondant extremely thin" um if I do this is will crack sag and fall of your cake and make for one very talked about wedding cake for all the wrong reasons!

ellavanilla Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 9:38pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

To really give you a freakout, I couldn't find any cake flour in the stores this week, so I subbed AP flour for cake flour in the recipes that called for it and IT WORKED just fine...wooooooooooooo! You just have to use less, it's all a matter of gluten.

 

You could also use soft wheat flour...

costumeczar Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 10:02pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellavanilla 

 

You could also use soft wheat flour...

That would be either the same as cake flour or biscuit flour, so I just opted for the AP with less of it. It works fine, as the cake scraps I was eating today provedicon_rolleyes.gif

Cakemommy2012 Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 11:02pm
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I have been doing cakes for over 10 years for friends and family-and for the past 2 years at a retail store.  After I do them I post them on my facebook etc. Today I posted a new cake I did, and one of my long time friends commented "Who knew you were so talented...."  REALLY!!!  Who says that?

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 5 Apr 2013 , 11:11pm
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Indeed. "cake flour" is a type of "soft" or "weak" flour (so-called because it comes from soft wheat, and forms weak gluten), while "bread flour" is a type of "hard" or "strong" flour (so-called because it comes from hard wheat, and forms strong gluten). All purpose flour, whether it comes from blending strong and weak flours, or from wheat that falls somewhere between "hard" and "soft," forms gluten of medium strength.

taartenmaker Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 12:38am
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AThis one time I had a couple that wanted to know if my cakes are halal (that means that they dont have animal products in it especially pig) and I said that my cakes don't have gelatin it it and they dimanded a list with all my cake ingredients! Lets say I kindly said no.

costumeczar Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 1:11am
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Original message sent by taartenmaker

This one time I had a couple that wanted to know if my cakes are halal (that means that they dont have animal products in it especially pig) and I said that my cakes don't have gelatin it it and they dimanded a list with all my cake ingredients! Lets say I kindly said no.

That wouldn't bother me so much, but I wouldn't give them the recipe. If you have to label your products you have to list the ingredients, so it would be something similar to that. It's when somebody wants the proportions that you say oh hell no.

EdieP Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 1:51am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cakemommy2012 

I have been doing cakes for over 10 years for friends and family-and for the past 2 years at a retail store.  After I do them I post them on my facebook etc. Today I posted a new cake I did, and one of my long time friends commented "Who knew you were so talented...."  REALLY!!!  Who says that?

 



I get that on my facebook page too..a lady wrote..did you make that?  If it is on my facebook page and I describe every detail..then yes I made it

Cakemommy2012 Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 1:57am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdieP 

 



I get that on my facebook page too..a lady wrote..did you make that?  If it is on my facebook page and I describe every detail..then yes I made it

I don't think they realize just how insensitive they are being! I even show pictures of my work in progress and they are still like "did you make that"  LOL

cazza1 Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 1:55pm
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I have lived most of my life in the country in Australia and until about 5 years ago had never even seen cake or bread flour.  To me cake flour was just something they had in America.  We used what we call 'plain flour' which is probably the equivalent of your all purpose flour.  Now that I can buy it I do sometimes but, in all honesty, I cannot tell any difference in my cakes or bickies.  I do buy bread flour to make the bread, however.

twisted sister Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 4:55pm
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Original message sent by EdieP

I get that on my facebook page too..a lady wrote..did you make that?  If it is on my facebook page and I describe every detail..then yes I made it

I get that too......shake my head and unfriend them.........it's like a slap in the face and salt in the wound :(

costumeczar Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 4:56pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cazza1 

I have lived most of my life in the country in Australia and until about 5 years ago had never even seen cake or bread flour.  To me cake flour was just something they had in America.  We used what we call 'plain flour' which is probably the equivalent of your all purpose flour.  Now that I can buy it I do sometimes but, in all honesty, I cannot tell any difference in my cakes or bickies.  I do buy bread flour to make the bread, however.

It definitely makes a difference if you use the wrong flour in a recipe. Cake flour is about 6% protein, pastry/biscuit flour is 8%, AP is around 11% and bread flour is 13%. The higher the protein, the more gluten develops and the tougher the finished product. I once used pastry flour for a recipe that called for cake flour and I could tell the difference.

 

Of course, if you use the right kind of flour and the wrong mixing methods, or you measure the flour wrong, you'll still get what we refer to as "inferior product" because that affects the texture too. Here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1mo-wURPo0&list=UUDru9n0gVtJlapF93R1npSw&index=5

SugaredSaffron Posted 6 Apr 2013 , 8:13pm
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Original message sent by taartenmaker

This one time I had a couple that wanted to know if my cakes are halal (that means that they dont have animal products in it especially pig) and I said that my cakes don't have gelatin it it and they dimanded a list with all my cake ingredients! Lets say I kindly said no.

Demanded or asked? And a halal cake would not only mean having no gelatin, but also no alcohol/extracts, no animal sourced whey powder (most common), no shellac, also some E numbers used as flavouring and colouring etc. So it's not unreasonable to ask for the ingredients list.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 1:23am
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Really, being asked if a cake is halal is no different in basic concept (and only slightly different in the details) from being asked if a cake is kosher. In both cases, you're dealing with perfectly legitimate religious dietary restrictions. (And there's a great deal of overlap between Jewish and Muslim dietary restrictions, and therefore a great deal of overlap between what's kosher and what's halal.)


Last night, I was watching Guy Fieri visit a Jewish deli, on Food Network, and the tease before the commercial mentioned a "maple bacon donut." That had me blinking; what is a Jewish deli doing serving something that contained bacon? Turned out to be house-made(!) beef bacon.


And my parents and I just polished off the last of the strawberry marble cake I made for Easter.

mcaulir Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 1:57am
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Halal doesn't mean no animal products.

sixinarow Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 2:56am
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Here's one--  Since you're just starting out, how about you give me a 3 tiered-fondant-covered-modeling-chocolate-figure-toppered-6-flavored-torted cake for my daughter's bridal shower..in 2 days. It'll be good for you and give you lots of exposure.

How kind of you to think of me but I'd rather GIVE you a poke in the eye. That'd work better for my schedule. icon_biggrin.gif

jason_kraft Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 3:32am
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Original message sent by SugaredSaffron

Demanded or asked? And a halal cake would not only mean having no gelatin, but also no alcohol/extracts, no animal sourced whey powder (most common), no shellac, also some E numbers used as flavouring and colouring etc. So it's not unreasonable to ask for the ingredients list.

Agreed, I don't see how asking for a list of ingredients falls under things not to ask a baker. IMO refusing to provide said list to a customer for any reason is something not to say to a customer.

Annabakescakes Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 3:37am
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Original message sent by mcaulir

Halal doesn't mean no animal products.

I posted that in another thread last night. It shocked me that people think that, since I used to work in a Kosher bakery, and there is quite a bit of overlap, so I googled "what is Halal" and the wiki dictionary entry, right on the top of the page, said it pertained to meat. Brilliant.

jason_kraft Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 3:46am
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Original message sent by mcaulir

Halal doesn't mean no animal products.

That's true, but in this context if a cake has no animal products (and no alcohol) it should be halal.

Annabakescakes Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 4:17am
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Original message sent by jason_kraft

That's true, but in this context if a cake has no animal products (and no alcohol) it should be halal.

I am happy to say you are wrong. The food has very strict cleanliness requirements, and must also be blessed or certified, or both by a certified inspector. They look at the ingredients, where they came from, how they are stored, the spatulas, the mixer, what else is prepared in there... for example, if the geletin or pork has ever even been in the kitchen it is not halal.

jennicake Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 6:22am
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 


I am happy to say you are wrong. The food has very strict cleanliness requirements, and must also be blessed or certified, or both by a certified inspector. They look at the ingredients, where they came from, how they are stored, the spatulas, the mixer, what else is prepared in there... for example, if the geletin or pork has ever even been in the kitchen it is not halal.

Just popping in to comment on this.  I asked a couple of friends who follow halal requirements to the letter, and most ingredients would be considered "halal" because they are not an animal byproduct.  Flour, sugar, etc are all inherently ok to use.  Eggs are also ok to use.  It's gelatin, alcohol (vanilla) and lard that would be the main concerns in a cake or pastry.  If a baker can assure them that there is none of these in a cake, then its still in accordance with their beliefs and ok to eat.  I have given cake from my kitchen to a few friends who only eat halal foods and they have been happy to eat it.  

 

I do agree with your last statement though... those strictly following the halal requirements will want to know that the kitchen where there food is being prepared will not have any possible cross-contamination happening.  For example, making a batch of jello in the kitchen and then using the same equipment to make some cake batter afterwards.  Or the baker chugging down some wine while decorating and accidentally splashing some onto the cake icon_biggrin.gif

meriem Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 7:47am
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AI'm Muslim, a halal came is petty easy to accomplish. The food doesn't need to be blessed, the only time food is blessed is when meat is being slaughtered and when we actually eat it ( we say 'bismillsh

meriem Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 7:53am
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AI'm a Muslim, a halal cake is petty easy to accomplish. The food doesn't need to be blessed, the only time food is blessed is when meat is being slaughtered (not applicable to cakes) and when we actually eat ( we say 'bismillah' in the name of Allah). In terms of cakes it just needs to be 100% alcohol free so including vanilla extract ( I use beans or the paste) and gelatine free. I have never been taught of not using the same spatula as you would use in another cake ( you do wash it right!) things don't need to be 100% separate as long as no contamination occurs. And yes kosher and halal are very similar (kosher IMO slightly more strict) if it's kosher then Muslims can eat it! With regards to the op I don't see why you can't list the ingredients just to keep your costumer's mind at ease

meriem Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 7:59am
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Original message sent by sixinarow

Here's one--  Since you're just starting out, how about you give me a 3 tiered-fondant-covered-modeling-chocolate-figure-toppered-6-flavored-torted cake for my daughter's bridal shower..in 2 days. It'll be good for you and give you lots of exposure. How kind of you to think of me but I'd rather GIVE you a poke in the eye. That'd work better for my schedule. :D

I got that too once! Just laughed it off to show them how ridiculous that is ' ha ha your so funny!'

cazza1 Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 8:06am
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Costumeczar I know all about the proteins in the different flours but they are only fairly new here as I said.  I have also never seen a recipe in an Australian cookbook that calls for cake flour.  Is it something that pops up regularly in Overseas books?  I wonder if different recipes are formulated slightly differently to account for the different flours.  I make wonderful cake but I will say I am very careful about not over mixing once the flour goes in.

SugaredSaffron Posted 7 Apr 2013 , 8:12am
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Word, you don't need to do any blessing for cake, and as long as your utensils are clean it's cool. Most commercial fondants are suitable for vegetarians as well, it's the homemade ones that are made with gelatin.

I'm assuming everyone washes their spatulas after sticking them into a great big piece of pig. Joke.
 

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