LisaPeps Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 8:03pm
post #1 of

Just looking for a bit of prior experience/knowledge! 

 

I'm going to be making a 5 tier round cake and want to know if a porcelain cake stand will hold the weight.

 

It's this stand (the 12") http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-525154/Sur-La-Table-White-Porcelain-Cake-Stands 

 

The cake will be 12/10/8/6/4 and will be on a 14 or 16" board (haven't decided yet)

 

Thanks in advance for your advice!

17 replies
-K8memphis Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 8:18pm
post #2 of

I would not do that. I'd get a larger stand because my cake tiers are 5"tall and heavy.

If you are making regular sized tiers I'd vote no to that also.

Slicing and serving that cake would make me nervous.

But if you are making short lightweight tiers it would work.

 

One of my pet peeves is cake too big for the plateau. It's like scraping fingernails on a chalkboard to me. But in this case it would work for short lightweight cakes because you'd have the larger correct sized board.

 

And if you do use this, you'll need to fill in the recessed area with one or two cardboard circles so your cake doesn't have any reason to consider drooping down in the middle there.

vgcea Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 8:32pm
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps 

Just looking for a bit of prior experience/knowledge! 

 

I'm going to be making a 5 tier round cake and want to know if a porcelain cake stand will hold the weight.

 

It's this stand (the 12") http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-525154/Sur-La-Table-White-Porcelain-Cake-Stands 

 

The cake will be 12/10/8/6/4 and will be on a 14 or 16" board (haven't decided yet)

 

Thanks in advance for your advice!

Sure, for like 5 minutes before your masterpiece pays homage to gravity and Isaac Newton. Your cake is going to be HEAVY, and that puny stand doesn't stand a chance. So far Sarah's Stands are the only ones I've heard of that are designed for heavy tiered cakes but even they are made of wood and have a weight limit. They cost between $120 and $250. You should check those out.

sweettooth101 Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:07pm
post #4 of

Marina Sousa on craftsy.com in her Jewelled Wedding cake segment has a lesson on making the pedestal cake stand, covered with fondant and strong and sturdy. The class is well worth(at times 50% off for only $20).

You can see the stand  by checking out her QUICK LOOK on the lesson.

LisaPeps Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:15pm
post #5 of

The cake is for somebody at work so I can't afford to buy one which runs in the hundreds of dollars + shipping to the UK + 15% import tax, worked it out to be about £175... And I really doubt they will buy one themselves. 

 

The stand in my original post held a 25kg (55lbs) tub of paint, would a 5 tier cake be heavier than that? My cakes are all 4" tall. 

 

Would this one work? http://www.therange.co.uk/dema-simplicity-31cm-footed-cake-stand//the-range/fcp-product/57294

 

It doesn't have the lip on it. 

 

If need be I could have the 12" tier as a dummy cake and have a cutting cake in the back. 

 

I've never seen a cake stand in the UK larger than 12" diameter :(

-K8memphis Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:21pm
post #6 of

20 inches of cake hovering over a beady little six inch base???

 

C'mon!

LisaPeps Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:22pm
post #7 of

It's not the 6" stand its the 12" stand 

Marianna46 Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:23pm
post #8 of

Probably not a good idea to have the bottom tier of a cake this size be a dummy. Dummies are light in weight and one at the bottom of a 5-tier cake would make the cake topheavy.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:26pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps 

It's not the 6" stand its the 12" stand 

The foot of the stand is six inches. The base of it. The plate above it is 12". If it's like the picture. The picture is of a footed stand. Did I get that right?

LisaPeps Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:32pm

AOh, I understand what you mean now!

-K8memphis Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 9:33pm

In this thread starting in post #5 is an idea on how to make a footed stand adequate to your needs.

 

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/68445-demo-making-a-wedding-cake-at-home/

LisaPeps Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 10:09pm

Thanks for all the suggestions and advice, I've given the couple a few different options (ie smaller cake and cakes in the kitchen, make a wooden stand like K8's etc) and I'll let them choose what to do.

CWR41 Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 10:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps 
The stand in my original post held a 25kg (55lbs) tub of paint, would a 5 tier cake be heavier than that? My cakes are all 4" tall.


Half that -- around 25 lbs. for cake and icing only (not including fondant, boards, etc.).

LisaPeps Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 11:12pm

AHmmm this one is on a porcelain stand http://vintageandcake.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/5-tier-wedding-cake.html and in the description she says its all cake. Still in 2 minds :S

-K8memphis Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 11:39pm

These are not four inch tall tiers. The second one looks like it's half as tall as the bottom tier and the bottom tier is maybe 3.5 inches with the sculpted edge. It might not sound like a lot but it is a lot of weight removed.

 

You can definitely do it. But if your tiers are 4 inches tall (after praying for mercy through the whole reception) I would remove it from the stand to serve.

 

And advise the client of the potential for avalanche.

-K8memphis Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 12:07am

But I would not build such a cake. And definitely not a fondanted one.

 

Good Luck!!!!

vgcea Posted 11 Dec 2012 , 5:08am

If the priority is the look of a 5 tier cake on a stand, and their budget or appreciation of what is realistic for that amount of cake is not feasible, then have you considered a 100% dummy cake? You could make that and stack it 20 deep (LOL) and keep the real cake in the kitchen.

Apti Posted 11 Dec 2012 , 5:36am

Personally, I'd never try it.  Something tall and heavy on a tiny little point of contact?  Nope. 

 

If anybody touched the table, or even bumped it "just a little"......oops.    If you bump the table, even a little, while removing the top two tiers for cutting......oops.   Assembling the cake tiers on-site would be s...c...a...r...y.

Even a tiny bump.....ooops.   If the table at the venue is not dead level.....ooops.  

 

The cake stand could probably "hold" a five-tier cake just fine.  Whether or not you can touch it while it's on the stand is another story.  

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