TheEnigmaFacade Posted 7 Dec 2012 , 8:37pm
post #1 of

So I bought a ton of candy melts (Vanleer and Merckens) because they're cheaper than chocolate.

Since Paramount crystals are to melts as cocoa butter is to chocolate, right, couldnt i use the same techniques used with cocoa butter in decorating molds with paramount crystals instead? has anyone done this?

 

Can you use cocoa butter decorating on candy melts?

 

(i was reading through old threads here, and someone maintained you can mix 1:2 chocolate/melts. Also mixing paraffin into chocolate)

also does have anyone have sources for looking at doing in-mold designs? Or how to paint molded chocolates with confectioner's glaze?

 

lots of questions, sorry i know.  dunce.gif

3 replies
BakingIrene Posted 7 Dec 2012 , 10:23pm
post #2 of

Designs in molds: you can paint with warm candy melts before you fill and chill.  People use heater trays to keep multiple metal cups of candy warm for painting convenience.  I think these are the same heaters that are used for candle painting.

 

Confectioners glaze would NOT be a good choice for fat based candy because it is formulated for sugar base.  You can colour the cocoa butter with powder food colour and paint with that on top of chilled candy melts or chocolate.

 

I would keep candy melts separate from real chocolate to avoid affecting the temperability of real chocolate.  

 

Good brands of candy melts like Merckens need only to be melted GENTLY and they do not need any addition of anything like paramount crystals or cocoa butter or oil or paraffin to set properly.

TheEnigmaFacade Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 4:41pm
post #3 of

ABut can you color paramount crystals like cocoa butter? I wanted to be able to do the paint spatter effect like on professional chocolates. I don't want to use colored candy melts, both for flavor and you can't use them in an airbrush like with cocoa butter.

BakingIrene Posted 9 Dec 2012 , 6:41pm
post #4 of

Instead of cocoa butter or paramount crystals, try coconut "oil" from a jar or "cream" from a solid brick.  They take the oil-based food colours very well.  And the oil is soft enough to spray.

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