doramoreno62 Posted 3 Dec 2012 , 4:59am
post #1 of

I have a wedding cake order coming up soon and I have no idea how to Achieve this look:

 

 

 

 

My problem is that I only work with Pastry Pride (stabilized whipped cream)

I was thinking of swirling dark and white chocolate on acetate then transfering on to the cake once it dries but is still flexible. Any tips on how I go about doing that? Or any different ideas please?

Any suestions would help!!

27 replies
SugarQueenie Posted 3 Dec 2012 , 5:15am
post #2 of

I wonder if you could just do an edible image? 

doramoreno62 Posted 3 Dec 2012 , 6:37am
post #3 of

SugarQueenie that is a great idea!! I even have an edible image printer and I use it alot. I can't believe that idea never occurred to me. Now to find the image. Or maybe I could brush on some white chocolate or white coloring on top of a brown edible sheet? I will experiment!!

Cjsmommy2012 Posted 3 Dec 2012 , 7:54am
post #4 of

what about doing chocolate fondant or brown fondant and painting white swirls on it ? hmm I wonder if that would work 

Nixs247 Posted 3 Dec 2012 , 9:28am
post #5 of

Just saw this post...I second the edible print route...do a practice sheet once you've found your pattern.
 

doramoreno62 Posted 3 Dec 2012 , 11:21pm
post #6 of

Cjsmommy2012 that would  certainly work but the cake is to be whipped cream,  not fondant.  but I appreciate your input though!

DeniseNH Posted 4 Dec 2012 , 12:59am
post #7 of

That looks like a chocolate transfer that might be for sale somewhere.  Why try to recreate it if you  can just purchase it.

leah_s Posted 4 Dec 2012 , 2:12am
post #8 of

That is a chocolate transfer.  I've seen it for sale numerous places online.  That particular product won't work on Pastry Pride, though.

doramoreno62 Posted 5 Dec 2012 , 12:35am
post #9 of

Leah_s I was afraid of that. I think my safest bet is to cover the cake with a brown edible image sheet and brush stroke on the white with either melted chocolate or some white white icing color before the sheet melts into the pastry pride.

 If there are any other ideas or suggestions, they are very welcomed.

Thanks for everyones help!

MissyTex Posted 5 Dec 2012 , 8:39pm

Why not frost with black and then pipe curvy lines in white with #3 tip or varying size tips and then drag toothpick through to marble it a bit with the black?  Or pipe ribbons with flat tip and drag a wide paint brush through.  Maybe something like that would achieve a similar effect.

doramoreno62 Posted 6 Dec 2012 , 4:14am

Well I thank you all for your ideas. I will be trying them this weekend. The cake isn't due until Dec 15th. I will post a picture once it is done.

Annabakescakes Posted 6 Dec 2012 , 6:26pm

I thought what Missy Tex said first, swirling it with a tooth pick. 

cupcake07 Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 2:00am

What if you took white fondant and brown fondant and mixed them together until they were just slightly 'swirled'....then roll out the fondant and cut the size piece you need to wrap around the cake? 

 

Or, take white fondant and do a few dabs of brown color on it and lightly knead the fondant to get a swirled look. 

BakingIrene Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 2:20pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by doramoreno62 

I have a wedding cake order coming up soon and I have no idea how to Achieve this look:

 

 

 

 

My problem is that I only work with Pastry Pride (stabilized whipped cream)

I was thinking of swirling dark and white chocolate on acetate then transfering on to the cake once it dries but is still flexible. 

With all respect, this is an order that I do not think would work with Pastry Pride.  That is a wonderful coating for good cakes but it does NOT lend itself to such an overprocessed flat surface.

Apart from airbrushing, I can't even see how you would get this cake made--because adding fondant on top of Pastry Pride will not work unless you can do it at the last minute. And chocolate when "dry" is hard.

You might succeed with chocolate ganache on sheets of plastic--but I am afraid it would take a solid week of practise to get the perfect finish in the picture.

 

So the lesson here is to not accept designs when they are not compatible with your menu.  I myself refuse to cover cakes with fondant except on fruitcakes (a few people prefer them).  I think it is better to know exactly what you can do when you promise something as significant as a wedding cake.

DeniseNH Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 4:49pm

I respectfully disagree with your last statement about knowing what you can do when accepting a wedding cake order.  I say yes to everything then talk it over with my cake club members.  They always have helpful suggestions for me.  If you continue to "stay safe", then you won't grow.  And all of us know that pushing yourself is what we all do in this business - to make each and every cake even better than the one before.  How many times have you heard the pros say that the real reason they accept a TV cake challenge is to push themselves beyond what they thought they could do.

Annabakescakes Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 5:19pm

A

Original message sent by DeniseNH

I respectfully disagree with your last statement about knowing what you can do when accepting a wedding cake order.  I say yes to everything then talk it over with my cake club members.  They always have helpful suggestions for me.  If you continue to "stay safe", then you won't grow.  And all of us know that pushing yourself is what we all do in this business - to make each and every cake even better than the one before.  How many times have you heard the pros say that the real reason they accept a TV cake challenge is to push themselves beyond what they thought they could do.

Bravo!! Well said! We'd all still be using bridges and separations and fake plastic ruffle and swans if we didn't step outside our comfort zone. That is, if we even had stacked and tiered cakes!!! Someone has to be an innovator, might as well be you, or me;-)

I really want to see this pattern tried with chocolate brown Pastry pride on a toothpick, swirled in the white...or white on brown. You can mist the bettercreme to keep it moist while you work, so you're not dragging skin or crust around.

I have half a mind to try it myself...

cakeplayground Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 5:42pm

You could swirl white and dark chocolate on acetate in the height of your layer.  Adhere the chocolate to the Pastry Pride.  Let it set and then peel back the acetate.

 

Teri Lyddiard

cakeplayground.com

Annabakescakes Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 11:27pm

AOoooo! I had another idea! Why don't you make the chocolate transfer, really thickly, and when you curve it, let it set into a size bigger than you need. let it set, freeze it a little, then pick it up in one piece and slide it over the cake... Just a thought!

BakingIrene Posted 11 Dec 2012 , 2:02am
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeniseNH 

I respectfully disagree with your last statement about knowing what you can do when accepting a wedding cake order.  I say yes to everything then talk it over with my cake club members.  They always have helpful suggestions for me.  

Nice for you that you have a club.  I didn't when I had wedding cake orders.  Nor did I have Youtube or any online resource...just the books in the public library and my own collection and my own experience.

 

 

If you continue to "stay safe", then you won't grow.  And all of us know that pushing yourself is what we all do in this business - to make each and every cake even better than the one before.  How many times have you heard the pros say that the real reason they accept a TV cake challenge is to push themselves beyond what they thought they could do.

I consider that there is a world of difference between a wedding cake which is a major event in the customer's life, and a TV competition.  The bride and groom deserve the assurance that they will get the cake that they picked out.  I think it's better to say "the icing isn't good for that style" and see what you can negotiate before you accept the deposit.

 

I was lucky to be able to do many baking experiments where there were people to scarf down whatever landed on their plates.  I still find the simple desire to eat a good piece of cake to be a good motivation to make every new recipe work.   But I would never charge somebody money for that learning curve.

 

A TV competition is a publicity stunt and an appropriate place to "push the envelope".  Not that I think much of competitions where you can be disqualified because you can't read the map in a strange city. 

bethola Posted 11 Dec 2012 , 2:56am
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s 

That is a chocolate transfer.  I've seen it for sale numerous places online.  That particular product won't work on Pastry Pride, though.

I've actually used this transfer.  It worked great.  Check it out in my pictures if you would like.  It's a wedding cake I did about 5 or 6 years ago! 

PS  VERY EASY to use too!

doramoreno62 Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 10:19am

So here is the finished cake. I'm quite happy with the results and so were the bride and groom. Thanks everyone for all your help!

http://cakecentral.com/g/a/3280010/white-brown-and-tiffany-blue-wedding-cake

Spuddysmom Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 3:48pm

That looks great! How did you finally pull it off?

cakefat Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 3:52pm

it looks very cool!!

Marianna46 Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 4:09pm

Very lovely cake, doramoreno!

doramoreno62 Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 7:49pm

Thank you! For the brown tiers I frosted with Pastry Pride then I cut a circle from a brown edible sheet and placed it on top. Then I wrapped the sides with another sheet (cut to size). I then painted the design with liquid pastry pride quickly before the sheet got too soft. Not too much though. I dipped a 1" pastry brush into it then dabbed it on a paper towel then painted. If any white showed thru from the seams I painted it with a little brown food color. If I would hae thought of it before, I would have airbrushed the seam areas brown first.

Izzy Sweet Posted 28 Dec 2012 , 8:21pm

That looks awesome... Good job !!!

cakeplayground Posted 29 Dec 2012 , 5:22pm

It looks great!

 

Teri 

CakePlayGround.com

DeniseNH Posted 29 Dec 2012 , 8:28pm

Thanks so much for showing us the photo.  You did a great job.  No wonder they were pleased.

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