alstarks0209 Posted 28 Nov 2012 , 4:38pm
post #1 of

Hello All,

 

I have a cake recipe I really like that serves 24 using a 9"x13" pan.

I need to make two 6" round cakes, two 9" round cakes, and two 12" round cakes. All 3" tall pans.

How do I calculate the ingredientsfrom the rectangle pan to the rounds?

 

Thanks for any help.

4 replies
-K8memphis Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 9:30pm
post #2 of

Guess how much batter you get from one recipe--anywhere from six to eight cups give or take. Then go to this chart, Wilton Cake Data Chart http://www.wilton.com/wedding/wedding-cakes/wedding-cake-data.cfm and do the math.

 

You need 41 cups of batter and that's probably 5 to 6 recipes.

 

When I need to determine the batter I need for a pan not listed ex. the 9" round-- I take half the difference in the amount for the 8" and the 10" and add to the smaller pan amount. The amount for the 8" is 5 cups the amount for the 10" is 8 cups so the difference is 3 cups--half of that is 1.5 so add that to the 5 cups (for the 8") that's 6.5 cups for one layer and 13 cups for a two layer.

SkisandBakes Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 10:02pm
post #3 of

Estimate the volume of batter you usually get out of your recipe - try filling your 9x13 pan with water to the level you would normally fill the batter and measure the volume of water. Do the same for your new pans. A little division and you have the number of batches of your original recipe you need to make.

 

Here is a conversion chart that I have used with success.

 

http://allrecipes.com/howto/cake-pan-size-conversions/

kakeladi Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 10:38pm
post #4 of

Using 3" deep pans will change any chart you might be guided to unless, of course, it is designated for 3" deep pans :)    Also consider is the 9x13 that you use 3" deep? Most likely not so your best bet is to fill each pan w/water,  measuring that to see how much total batter you will need.  Do the same w/your 9x13 pan so you know how much batter that pan holds in order to compare.

-K8memphis Posted 10 Dec 2012 , 11:14pm
post #5 of

Lynne is right of course. And Wilton does have a guide for three inchers--just go to the guide and scroll down.

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