alene Posted 11 Nov 2012 , 9:59pm
post #1 of

A

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5 replies
Jmlpitbull Posted 11 Nov 2012 , 10:20pm
post #2 of

AIt is fondant with texture added with a modeling tool. Similar to the way you would add indentations for pages on a book cake. Make sense?

BlakesCakes Posted 11 Nov 2012 , 10:40pm
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If I were doing it, I'd cover the top of the cake with a smooth circle of fondant about 2" larger than the diameter and apply it.  I'd then roll out a long rectangle of fondant about 2X the height of the tier and a bit shorter than the circumference.  I'd gently pleat the piece evenly so that it was as wide as the height of the tier and let it sit for a few minutes.  I'd then apply it around the cake tier, turning under the ends a bit.  I'd add a decorative piece down the middle.

 

Rae

alene Posted 11 Nov 2012 , 10:54pm
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Jmlpitbull, yes that makes sense.   BluesCakes, I understand what you are talking about also, just don't know if I'm up to the challenge.

KoryAK Posted 12 Nov 2012 , 1:33am
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I'd say that's definitely done using a liner tool and it's not nearly as hard as you think!

BlakesCakes Posted 12 Nov 2012 , 9:14pm
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I can see doing it with a tool, but.......in order to get nice definition of the pleats, you'd need a decently thick layer of soft BC under a thick-ish layer of fondant and you'd have to be very quick so as not to tear the fondant or get elephant skin. 

 

I think that doing it as a pleated panel allows for less BC and a thinner piece of fondant, as well as more working time.  Also, working on a firmer surface allows for crisper pleats.

 

But in the long run, whatever way that works for YOU is the best way.

 

Rae

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