katehalliday1987 Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 3:08pm
post #1 of

AHi all. I just wanting to get some advice. I am making a recipe which calls from couverture chocolate. (Milk and white). I am just wanting some help to understand the difference between couverture chocolate and say normal Cadbury/ nestle' chocolate. Is this something I will need to order online or can it be bought in cake shop/ supermarket??? Thanks in advance Kate

13 replies
BlakesCakes Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 7:10pm
post #2 of

Couverture chocolate is "fake" chocolate--like candy melts/summer coating.  It's a product that doesn't need tempering like real chocolate.  Cadbury/Nestle are real chocolate and needs to be tempered in order to assure proper results.

 

HTH

Rae
 

kimmisue2009 Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 7:28pm
post #3 of

I thought it was the opposite - I thought it was a higher quality chocolate than just your standard.  I should maybe stop thinking....

thecakewitch Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 7:28pm
post #4 of

Couverture chocolate is NOT "fake" chocolate:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Couverture_chocolate

AZCouture Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 8:01pm
post #5 of

Dang you Aussie's tempting us with your FAKE chocolate mud cakes and FAKE ganache covered creations.....DANG YOU!!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

AZCouture Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 8:03pm
post #6 of

I don't think she meant fake in quite the scandalous way some might interpret it. ;) Yes, no tempering requiring, just melt with hot cream and off ya go. 

ApplegumPam Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 8:06pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes 

Couverture chocolate is "fake" chocolate--like candy melts/summer coating.  It's a product that doesn't need tempering like real chocolate.  Cadbury/Nestle are real chocolate and needs to be tempered in order to assure proper results.

 

HTH

Rae
 


You have this wrong!

Couverture IS the good - REAL chocolate.... it IS the one that needs to be tempered for some things - to retain the gloss/shine/crack

CANDY MELTS and MOST things Nestle are FAKE !! 

Jaime - you should know by now - us Aussies only like the FINE things in life -  we don't even know what Tootsie Rolls are ! hahaha

 

ApplegumPam Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 8:14pm
post #8 of

Thought I should add..... when you are making a mudcake or ganache - then couverture chocolate does not require tempering - you won't get the gloss/shine or crack happening but then for these .... you don't need it !!

IF you need to trim your budget a bit - I'd advise using the cheaper chocolate (NEVER Candy melts!!!!!!!)  in the mudcake - where it is less appreciated by most of the population and reserve the GOOD stuff for your ganache - where it WILL always be appreciated  :)

AZCouture Posted 2 Nov 2012 , 8:28pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by ApplegumPam 
 


Jaime - you should know by now - us Aussies only like the FINE things in life -  we don't even know what Tootsie Rolls are ! hahaha

 

icon_lol.gif Heck yeah!

katehalliday1987 Posted 3 Nov 2012 , 5:11am

AOk thanks all.. Is there a certain brand I should use??? It's for white and milk chocolate I think I need 700g white and 300g milk

ApplegumPam Posted 3 Nov 2012 , 5:22am
Quote:
Originally Posted by katehalliday1987 

Ok thanks all.. Is there a certain brand I should use??? It's for white and milk chocolate I think I need 700g white and 300g milk


Really depends on where you are located and how much money you have to spend -  best advice I can give you is to pick a chocolate that you love the taste of.

 

In Australia - Callebaut is pretty reasonable - fine for cakes and ganache but I'd lean towards the Felchin for chocolate shard /chocolate deco types of cakes (ie the Julie Whitehead ones)  :)

katehalliday1987 Posted 3 Nov 2012 , 5:47am

A

Original message sent by ApplegumPam

Really depends on where you are located and how much money you have to spend -  best advice I can give you is to pick a chocolate that you love the taste of.

In Australia - Callebaut is pretty reasonable - fine for cakes and ganache but I'd lean towards the Felchin for chocolate shard /chocolate deco types of cakes (ie the Julie Whitehead ones)  :)

I'm located in Melbourne. It's for a adriano zumbo cake. So it's already costing quite a lot but I want it be be "the best" do you know where I could purchuce felchin and is it available in white?

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Nov 2012 , 9:30pm

Yes, I was completely wrong and I apologize for the mis-information.  I had it absolutely backwards and I didn't do my usual google fact check before posting.

Must have been a moment of Romnesia......as my response reflects "confectionary" rather than "couverture"

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Couverture_chocolate

 

This link clarifies it very well, including the fact that "Subsequent tempering may or may not be required, depending on the usage and the desired characteristics of the final product."

 

Mea culpa

Rae

learning123 Posted 5 Nov 2012 , 1:09pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by katehalliday1987 


I'm located in Melbourne. It's for a adriano zumbo cake. So it's already costing quite a lot but I want it be be "the best" do you know where I could purchuce felchin and is it available in white?

If your in Melb, go to "The Essential Ingredient " at Parahan Market. They sell premium Couverture choc & its nice, ive used it myself for mud cake & ganache. They have a website if you want to google them

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