Karolina-Cake-Designer Posted 26 Oct 2012 , 1:02pm
post #1 of

Hello,

I am a total beginner with sugar glass, but I am very excited about it because I used to work as a REAL glass designer. My dream is to transform my skills into edible art.

Would you let me know what are your experience with e.g. colouring these, how to shape them? I do not have a fire gun, nore any other things like molds, just usual basic kitchen tools.

I would like to try and avoid using isomalt as it's "not so good" for digestion.

Thank you for your help!!! I will appreciate any comments! Or links to tutorials... anything. I feel there isn't much said about these, is it?

Karolina
LL

4 replies
costumeczar Posted 28 Oct 2012 , 6:30pm
post #2 of

Get a silicone mat like a Silpat to use for pouring the sugar out until it's cool enough to handle. You have to work fast if you're shaping it. what are you trying to make with it, anything specific?

bethola Posted 28 Oct 2012 , 6:51pm
post #3 of

Much like working with glass you need to keep it at a consistent temp. My hubby made a heating box for me and it works great. You'll find isomalt "colors" better as sugar has a slight "yellow" look to it.

Either way....GOOD LUCK! I LOVE working with pulled sugar. It makes a simple cake look GORGEOUS!

costumeczar Posted 28 Oct 2012 , 7:09pm
post #4 of

There's also a forum on here for sugar and isomalt work, I found it after I answered the first time icon_rolleyes.gif

Karolina-Cake-Designer Posted 1 Nov 2012 , 12:19pm
post #5 of

thank you, I appreciate your advice! I tried to use extra thick aluminium foil which I greased, and common latex gloves... ahahaaaa my hands got stuck to everything if you saw what I did, and the nerves and struggle, you would have a good laugh. what do you mean by a "heating box"? yes I know common granulated sugar looks slightly yellowish or even caramelish colour, but it was my first experience and I learnt from it a lot, I like poured glass a lot. I think it has a lot of "wow" factor but things can't be modelled quite as neatly as in fondant.

after looking into isomalt I think I would give it a try. for its properties.

thank you once again!

K.

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