dawnybird Posted 25 Oct 2012 , 1:00am
post #1 of

I melted dark chocolate chips and piped them into filigree hearts to use as cupcake toppers. After freezing them for about 20 minutes, I took them out and they got so melty and soft, I can't take them off of the parchment paper. I did the same with white chocolate chips and they turned out fine. Can anyone tell me why the chocolate won't hold it's shape at room temp.? It's about 75 degrees in my house. Thank you!

6 replies
KoryAK Posted 25 Oct 2012 , 4:33am
post #2 of

Because chocolate chips are designed to stay soft after melting - think about a chocolate chip cookie. White "chocolate" is a different animal. Try candy melts or almond bark - it will give you the effect you are looking for.

BakingIrene Posted 25 Oct 2012 , 2:02pm
post #3 of

You need to use real chocolate and TEMPER it. Use google to find instructions.

dawnybird Posted 25 Oct 2012 , 5:47pm
post #4 of

Thanks to you both for your replies. The thing that confuses me is that I have used melted chocolate chips before to make chocolate leaves by spreading it on rose leaves and peeling off the leaf once the chocolate hardens. Maybe I'm remembering wrong and I had used block chocolate.

KoryAK Posted 25 Oct 2012 , 5:47pm
post #5 of

Real, tempered chocolate or candy melts will give the same visual effect at the end of the day. Of course, real chocolate tastes better, is higher-end, etc. but if the OP is at the point in her skills where she is trying to melt chocolate chips for this (please take no offense OP) so I highly doubt she wants to learn the quite finicky skill set that is properly tempering chocolate.

Bottom line OP, either of our suggestions will work fine for your application icon_smile.gif

dawnybird Posted 26 Oct 2012 , 3:20am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoryAK

Real, tempered chocolate or candy melts will give the same visual effect at the end of the day. Of course, real chocolate tastes better, is higher-end, etc. but if the OP is at the point in her skills where she is trying to melt chocolate chips for this (please take no offense OP) so I highly doubt she wants to learn the quite finicky skill set that is properly tempering chocolate.

Bottom line OP, either of our suggestions will work fine for your application icon_smile.gif




Thanks, KoryAK. No offense taken. My skills with chocolate are indeed few. I have watched many videos and tutorials on tempering chocolate but have never tried it. I mostly bake and decorate cakes using buttercream, fondant, etc. Anyway, thanks for the response!

Stitches Posted 26 Oct 2012 , 3:23am
post #7 of

Actually what went wrong was that you froze it. When you use either chocolate chips or an expensive couveture the same thing happens to both when you freeze them to get them to set.

Chocolate that's frozen to set up always gets melty once it comes to room temp.. Instead you should let it harden/set at room temp.. If you work in a very cool room (78 degrees or less) that will assist with the chocolate setting fast.

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