Sherryb Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 2:14am
post #1 of

I need to make a grooms cake that looks like a snare drum. Does anyone know what this is and has anyone made one?
Sherry

12 replies
SquirrellyCakes Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 2:21am
post #2 of

Haven't made one, but your best bet is to do a snare drum search on the internet and print out a picture. It is a sort of side drum, with specific tension attachments along the sides, it is shallow in depth. Haha, can you tell, my brother-in-law was a local rock band drummer!
Hugs Squirrely Cakes

alimonkey Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 2:44am
post #3 of

A snare drum really looks like just your basic drum, with a high tension head. It's usually carried on a strap - I don't think you see them much in rock bands, mostly marching bands, bagpipe bands and such, but also in orchestras, I think. I think the kind I've seen some bagpipe bands use were pretty shallow, but I may just be remembering the practice drums hanging around my grandparents' and uncle's house.

Soooooo....If it were me, I'd just make a drum, just a plain old drum, a little shorter than you might otherwise, maybe with a shoulder strap coiled down next to/behind it if you're really good with fondant, depending on what kind of band the groom plays in.

Here's one Earlene did that looks a lot like a snare drum.

http://www.earlenescakes.com/drum.htm

Ali

Sherryb Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 2:44am
post #4 of

Thank you....now I need to know....the wedding cake is to feed a hundred, how many should the grooms cake feed.
I have never done the wedding cake and the grooms cake,too.
Sherry

Sherryb Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 2:51am
post #5 of

Thanks, Ali...that's a great picture of the drum.
I have a meeting with the bride this weekend to decide on what kind of cake she wants. The wedding is Oct. 29th so I have some time to work it all out.
Sherry




Everyone is so helpful and nice on CC.

crp7 Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 2:59am
post #6 of

How many people the groom's cake should feed is really up to the bride and groom. Usually it does not feed as many as the wedding cake but some people want to have enough so that the guests could have a slice of each since they are usually different flavors.

I would guess ( and this is just me) that if the wedding cake is for 100 you would have the groom's cake feed 50-75. Or if they just want to be sure they have plenty of cake you might suggest the drum in whatever size you choose then have 1 or 2 half sheets in the back that could be served.

Cindy

Sherryb Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 3:17am
post #7 of

Thank you Cindy...that's a good idea.
I am getting lots of good ideas on what I should ask or tell the bride when I meet with her.
Sherry

crp7 Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 3:31am
post #8 of

Great, I hope that helps. I think the sheet cakes are a good option because you can probably just put a border around the bottom and call it good. Depending on your prices (I have just recently started charging anything and have not charged for a wedding cake) that option might be easier for you and save the bride a little money if she wants the extra cake.

Let us know what you all decide. I know you will do great.

SquirrellyCakes Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 3:59am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by alimonkey

A snare drum really looks like just your basic drum, with a high tension head. It's usually carried on a strap - I don't think you see them much in rock bands, mostly marching bands, bagpipe bands and such, but also in orchestras, I think. I think the kind I've seen some bagpipe bands use were pretty shallow, but I may just be remembering the practice drums hanging around my grandparents' and uncle's house.

Soooooo....If it were me, I'd just make a drum, just a plain old drum, a little shorter than you might otherwise, maybe with a shoulder strap coiled down next to/behind it if you're really good with fondant, depending on what kind of band the groom plays in.

Here's one Earlene did that looks a lot like a snare drum.

http://www.earlenescakes.com/drum.htm

Ali



Haha, Ali, they are actually used in rock bands, they sit to the side and are on a stand, shame on you, haha! The carrying straps are for marching bands, but the snare drum is a normal part of a drum set, makes a distintive sound! Now apologize to rock band drummers everywhere, haha!
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes

alimonkey Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 4:08am

Good grief!! Shows you how often I go see live music! And I live in the "Live Music Capital of the World!" I guess I just don't pay that much attention. I'll have to listen harder the next time I listen to something other than Old McDonald on the radio. icon_redface.gif

Ali

SquirrellyCakes Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 4:12am
Quote:
Originally Posted by alimonkey

Good grief!! Shows you how often I go see live music! And I live in the "Live Music Capital of the World!" I guess I just don't pay that much attention. I'll have to listen harder the next time I listen to something other than Old McDonald on the radio. icon_redface.gif

Ali



Heehee, you perk up those Texan ears, girl, haha!
That is ok, if my brother-in-law wasn't a drummer, I wouldn't know much at all, haha! In fact, those drumsticks have come in handy more than once, hhmn, when I ran out of wooden dowels late at night! I also used some for logs for a cake I made for a neighbour that is retired and makes spare money cutting firewood!
Hugs Squirrelly

alimonkey Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 4:27am

Wow, SC, those are some pretty expensive dowels and logs! Even Wilton stuff has to be cheaper than drumsticks! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

Ali

SquirrellyCakes Posted 15 Sep 2005 , 4:42am

Well, they used to have a musical instrument store in their family, so he held onto a lot of equipment when they closed their doors, so they were free to me, haha!
I have used them to use fondant and gumpaste to shape drumsticks after too.
Comes in handy when I need to make a miniature musical instrument out of fondant, I just borrow the real thing to duplicate.
Hugs Squirrelly

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