Kezzie Posted 12 Oct 2012 , 10:53am
post #1 of

Please help how can I stop my cakes doming in the middle

38 replies
southerncross Posted 12 Oct 2012 , 11:14am
post #2 of

Do you use the strips on the sides of the pans? That seems to work for me.

costumeczar Posted 14 Oct 2012 , 11:01pm
post #3 of

Lower the oven temperature a little.

savannahquinn Posted 14 Oct 2012 , 11:15pm
post #4 of

I also use Wilton baking strips. My cakes never dome. The one's I have need to be secured with straight pins, I have seen one's which close with velcro, I bet those are easier to work with.

cheatize Posted 15 Oct 2012 , 1:34am
post #5 of

Velcro! Oh My Goodness! Do you think I can sew Velcro onto my Wilton bake even strips and not affect their effectiveness?

If I can, I will be ecstatic! Yes, even more exclamation points ecstatic! The light bulb is going off over here, folks. Velcro! No more shoving those pins into my fingers, bending pins, using multiple pins, etc.... Velcro!

southerncross Posted 15 Oct 2012 , 2:15am
post #6 of

LOL....I've been so desperate as to use paper clips to hold my baking strips together. And a friend of mine was driven to improvising strips by wrapping a strip of damp cotton cloth in tin foil and wrapping it around the cake pan. Boy, do we all love our baking stips!

MarianInFL Posted 15 Oct 2012 , 2:32am
post #7 of

I use paper clips, as I lost the pins right away. Wouldn't Velcro melt? Isn't one side plastic?

cheatize Posted 15 Oct 2012 , 3:11am
post #8 of

There's stick on Velcro, which has an adhesive on the back, and sew on Velcro, which I think it made of fabric. Perhaps the grippy side is plastic, though.

ApplegumPam Posted 15 Oct 2012 , 9:34am
post #9 of

I make my own baking strips out of folded paper towel encased in alfoil - hold together with small bulldog clips

Tahe4ka Posted 16 Oct 2012 , 2:30pm

I got cake dome every time I bake in the 6x3 inches pans and strips don`t help. I need any advise.

costumeczar Posted 16 Oct 2012 , 2:45pm

lowering the oven temp is a lot easier than wrestling with cake strips thumbs_up.gif

jawalk Posted 16 Oct 2012 , 3:10pm

This works for me: Bake @ 325 degrees and when cake is done remove from oven and lay a dry dish cloth on top. Press gently all over top until the cake is level. Let rest a few minutes and then remove from cake pan onto cooling rack. Be careful it will be hot with steam while you are pressing.

Tahe4ka Posted 16 Oct 2012 , 3:11pm

I bake 350F. How low it should be? 325 or 300?

costumeczar Posted 16 Oct 2012 , 3:21pm

Depends ont he cake, but around 340 works for me. If I have a full oven I'll raise the temp if I'm opening the door a lot to take things in and out.

cheatize Posted 16 Oct 2012 , 6:47pm

I do lower my oven. I also use the rose nails. I still get more dome that I like. I've got the third of 5 cakes I'm baking today in the oven right now. The bake even strips help a lot and there's barely any dome.

Tahe4ka Posted 17 Oct 2012 , 4:31pm

Thank you for your help!! It works icon_smile.gif

venuscakes Posted 20 Oct 2012 , 7:48pm

This may not be of any help as I am based in the UK and use marzipan underneath rolled fondant wheras it doesnt seem to be used in the US. If a cake domes excessively I turn it upside down so that the flat surface becomes the top and then roll a sausage of marzipan which I push around the bottom of the cake to fill the gap. This keeps the cake tier nice & deep and aviods trimming the cake down.
Amanda x

cakegrandma Posted 20 Oct 2012 , 8:36pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

lowering the oven temp is a lot easier than wrestling with cake strips thumbs_up.gif




I agree, the strips are a pain in the a$$ to me.

costumeczar Posted 20 Oct 2012 , 8:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by venuscakes

This may not be of any help as I am based in the UK and use marzipan underneath rolled fondant wheras it doesnt seem to be used in the US. If a cake domes excessively I turn it upside down so that the flat surface becomes the top and then roll a sausage of marzipan which I push around the bottom of the cake to fill the gap. This keeps the cake tier nice & deep and aviods trimming the cake down.
Amanda x




that's a good idea1

Sara1029 Posted 1 Nov 2012 , 8:04pm

I put my cake release in the pan then throw it in the freezer for 20-30 minutes prior.

Then take it out and put your batter in, then right into your oven. :)

cakesbyzuly Posted 4 Nov 2012 , 8:28pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sara1029 

I put my cake release in the pan then throw it in the freezer for 20-30 minutes prior.

Then take it out and put your batter in, then right into your oven. :)

Wao, this is the first time I read something like this?  What is that suppose to do?  If it helps I am going to try it.

kakeladi Posted 4 Nov 2012 , 10:05pm

Just came across this post and haven't read all the replies.  Baking at a lower temp (300 to 325 F) is all that is necessary.

Use my *original* WASC recipe :)  All the information on proper baking in in that post.  Read ALL the replies on that.  [Sorry I can't link you to the recipe since the new format :( ]

Nonni53 Posted 5 Nov 2012 , 7:30pm

AI don't use bake strips, tried them not thrilled. But I do collar my pans with parchment which also results in a more even rise and worry free removal (parchment bottom and sides). Also press cakes immediately after removal from oven and bake at 325 (300 with the convection on). Basically love parchment and love the fact that my cakes do not have that flour shortening goo marring the outside. Get whole sheet size then just sit and cut all my circles and collars at once.

remnant3333 Posted 9 Nov 2012 , 3:50am

I used to have problems with leveling out my cakes but once I found this link below on youtube, my problems are now over when my cakes dome.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuFsKfOfDDE check it out and see what you think. I guess everyone has their own ways to do things. I do what works for me.
 

remnant3333 Posted 9 Nov 2012 , 4:04am

Hello, Here is a link on you tube showing how one lady evens out her domed cakes. I am sure if you have a much bigger cake it would be hard to do this.

I am going to try this on my next cake to see if this helps. I also cut out some cotton terry cloths to put around cake to try. I will just experiment and see what works best for me. On one place where I read on internet said to turn cakes down to 300 degrees and cooks the cake the full amount of time per your recipe plus half the time in order for cake to be done. I do tend to have problems evening out my cakes so I am hoping that by trial and error that sooner or later I will get it right.  

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuFsKfOfDDE

leah_s Posted 9 Nov 2012 , 4:45am

One word.

 

Agbay.

remnant3333 Posted 9 Nov 2012 , 9:43pm

One word.

 

Agbay.

 

Could you please explain what the above means? I am trying to learn more about cakes and I don't understand what you are saying to me.

Thank you
 

shanter Posted 10 Nov 2012 , 3:03am
Quote:
Originally Posted by remnant3333 

One word.

 

Agbay.

 

Could you please explain what the above means? I am trying to learn more about cakes and I don't understand what you are saying to me.

Thank you
 

 

It is a brand of cake-leveler: http://www.agbayproducts.com/  very highly recommended. However, they are a bit expensive, so it depends on how many cakes you make. I don't have one because I only bake for family and friends. I use wet newspapers wrapped in aluminum foil and held tight with binder clips (no pins, paperclips, velcro): Not messy.

remnant3333 Posted 10 Nov 2012 , 3:20am

Thank you for the idea about wet newspapers and foil.  Do you find that you have to cook the cake longer by using the wet newspapers with foil? I will also look at the cake leveler. I really don't make a whole lot of cakes either since I too only do for a few neighbors kids and their moms. I am hoping that as I bake more that I will be able to learn from everyone here on this forum.  I am just learning and need all the information that others can give me.  I do appreciate everyone here on the forum who has helped me to learn more. Hopefully one day I will get better at baking. You guys are wonderful!!! Thanks again/Mary
 

remnant3333 Posted 10 Nov 2012 , 5:05am

anyone ever try the below attached? I am just wondering if this works or is this some kind of thing people buy and then whey they try it, it does not work.  It is a cake cover made in all different sizes that you put on top of the cake while baking. Please let me know if anyone has one of these and how you like it. Thanks/Mary

 

http://www.cakemarvel.com/
 

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