Charmed Posted 27 Sep 2012 , 10:40pm
post #1 of

I saw this cake structure/support and my question is how the round wooden board is attached to the pole and what is holding it in its place? I have attached a picture.
LL

14 replies
CWR41 Posted 27 Sep 2012 , 11:58pm
post #2 of

It could be done as in this tutorial:

http://sweeteatscakes.blogspot.com/2010/12/topsy-turvy-stand-tutorial.html

(where the board is actually resting on the angled cut of the PVC pipe, and the PVC pipe sections are slipped over the internal center metal pipe.)

Charmed Posted 29 Sep 2012 , 12:44am
post #3 of

thanks,,,any other suggestions? icon_biggrin.gif

cheatize Posted 29 Sep 2012 , 1:48am
post #4 of

When hubby made me one, he used a nut looking thing. He says he thinks it was a female union? It all came back apart again- several times. Go to the hardware store and look around in the PVC/plumbing aisle.

Charmed Posted 1 Oct 2012 , 6:33pm
post #5 of

is this female union screwed to the wooden board? how does it attached to the wooden dowel?

gmfcakes Posted 1 Oct 2012 , 7:48pm
post #6 of

Here is a link to a topic that I saved from cake central for this stand and they show how to make it on the 2nd or 3rd page.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-665328.html

gmfcakes Posted 1 Oct 2012 , 8:04pm
post #7 of

Meant she writes how her dad made it for her. HTH

Charmed Posted 2 Oct 2012 , 10:40pm
post #8 of

Thanks for the link. but the pic that I posted, it is just a wooden pole and I can't see any pvc stopper.

lilmissbakesalot Posted 2 Oct 2012 , 11:08pm
post #9 of

No... I'd be willing to bet money that is a PVC pipe. There is a wooden dowel inside though. I am thinking that it's angle cut PVC with the board sandwiched in between. The PVC acts as a spacer and gives the board support and holds it in place.

I have built cupcake towers like this (nice and level though... LOL) and it works perfectly.

cheatize Posted 2 Oct 2012 , 11:45pm

I assumed it was pvc, that's why I mentioned the union. If it's wood, then I dunno. icon_smile.gif

lilmissbakesalot Posted 3 Oct 2012 , 2:09am

This is how I imagine it... a central wooden dowel attached to the base. PVC piping cut that the angle of your tilt slipped over the dowel... a wooden circle with a hole drilled in it that is not bigger than teh diameter of the PVC pipe so it won't slip down to support the tilted tier... another piece of PVC slipped over the dowel cut at the same angle to keep the board in place and provide the angle for the next floating tilted tier.... and so on until you are done.

You would have to drill your holes in the wodden cake boards at the right angle too or they won't sit tilted... maybe if you made it a little bigger than the width of the wooden dowel though it would be able to sit crooked without the angle.
LL

Charmed Posted 4 Oct 2012 , 1:32am

More I look at it, more I think it is PVC.. Thank you all for your help thumbs_up.gif

Charmed Posted 4 Oct 2012 , 1:33am

This is great! Thanks so much for the pic and explanation!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilmissbakesalot

This is how I imagine it... a central wooden dowel attached to the base. PVC piping cut that the angle of your tilt slipped over the dowel... a wooden circle with a hole drilled in it that is not bigger than teh diameter of the PVC pipe so it won't slip down to support the tilted tier... another piece of PVC slipped over the dowel cut at the same angle to keep the board in place and provide the angle for the next floating tilted tier.... and so on until you are done.

You would have to drill your holes in the wodden cake boards at the right angle too or they won't sit tilted... maybe if you made it a little bigger than the width of the wooden dowel though it would be able to sit crooked without the angle.


lilmissbakesalot Posted 12 Oct 2012 , 3:52am

No problem at all! icon_biggrin.gif

Nancy 07701 Posted 24 Jun 2014 , 10:08pm

So I tried this set up and found that the cakes have to be placed on the angle of the plate. We used a threaded rod and had the pvc slipped over the rod.  Also it is best to put the pvc pipe in the cake as you are stacking because then it will go together easier especially if you stack with multiple boards for support.  Meaning put the pvc into the cake on the angle of which it is going to rest on the center dowel/rod. The cake boards sat between the pipes nicely and were well supported. We put 2 nuts on the bottom side and then I realized I should have done the same for the top of the board to keep it from shifting when placing the cakes on top. But it did remain sturdy. 


The top cake was supposed to be a bag dumping everything out but the fondant was too heavy and the buttercream too soft and all my work fell off. This is the ugly repair with what I had left of the fondant. The whole set up is pretty sturdy but I think we put too much of an angle on our boards.

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