Leahmaria7981 Posted 19 Sep 2012 , 12:54am
post #1 of

I have a client who is wanting an italian cream cake as a layer in her wedding cake. She is wanting to have it covered in regular buttercream but have the filling be the cream cheese icing that goes with italian cream cake. Is it ok for that to be left out, ot does it need to be refrigerated? If it does, would it be ok for me to refrigerate that one tier until it is time to set up the cake and they refrigerate it after the wedding'? This is the first time I have been asked for anything other than a basic flavor and buttercream icing and I just want to be sure. I'd hate to make someone sick. Would it be ok?

9 replies
DeniseNH Posted 19 Sep 2012 , 2:14am
post #2 of

The cake will be on display for many hours, before the reception, during the reception and possibly being taken home after the recption ends. That's why our state won't allow us to produce anything with cheese, butter or cream in it.

scp1127 Posted 19 Sep 2012 , 4:49am
post #3 of

I do this all the time. Don't keep the cake out during the whole event. Let it make its debut closer to the time of serving. Be sure to have it taken care of after the event.

scp1127 Posted 19 Sep 2012 , 4:50am
post #4 of

I do this all the time. Don't keep the cake out during the whole event. Let it make its debut closer to the time of serving. Be sure to have it taken care of after the event.

carmijok Posted 19 Sep 2012 , 5:39am
post #5 of

A cake that is delivered cold will take several hours to come to room temp. The internal temp stays quite cool for quite a long time. Deliver a cold cake. No one will get sick. Sugar is a preservative and unless it's been outside in 100 degree plus temp for a couple of days, you should have no problem.

As far as the poster who said their health department wouldn't allow anything made with butter, cream or cheese... Really? How stupid is that? What are you left with? Plastic? My buttercream is real butter and cream cheese. And yes, it's been left out for hours and served at (gasp!) room temp. Got the recipe from the bakery I worked for. Lots of Italian cream cakes and no deaths or illness. Of course it goes without saying that all your ingredients should be the freshest you can get.

vgcea Posted 19 Sep 2012 , 6:30am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok

A cake that is delivered cold will take several hours to come to room temp. The internal temp stays quite cool for quite a long time. Deliver a cold cake. No one will get sick. Sugar is a preservative and unless it's been outside in 100 degree plus temp for a couple of days, you should have no problem.

As far as the poster who said their health department wouldn't allow anything made with butter, cream or cheese... Really? How stupid is that? What are you left with? Plastic? My buttercream is real butter and cream cheese. And yes, it's been left out for hours and served at (gasp!) room temp. Got the recipe from the bakery I worked for. Lots of Italian cream cakes and no deaths or illness. Of course it goes without saying that all your ingredients should be the freshest you can get.




Bwahahahahaa! I'm sorry but this had me hollering.

cherran Posted 25 Sep 2012 , 8:06pm
post #7 of

So, while I was laughing my....I went to the New Hampshire food service web site and found this:

Please be advised you can only make non-potentially hazardous food in your residential kitchen including but not limited to breads, rolls, muffins, cookies, brownies, double crusted fruit pies, candy and fudge, packaged dry products, jams and jellies.

You cannot make potentially hazardous food in your home to offer to consumers. Examples of these foods are: cheesecakes, pumpkin pies, custards, soups, sandwiches and acidified or low acid foods such as pickles and relish.


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BakingIrene Posted 25 Sep 2012 , 9:51pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by cherran

So, while I was laughing my....I went to the New Hampshire food service web site and found this:

You cannot make potentially hazardous food in your home to offer to consumers. Examples of these foods are: cheesecakes, pumpkin pies, custards, soups, sandwiches and acidified or low acid foods such as pickles and relish.

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Well that's Noo Hampsha for ya.

Pickles made with vinegar-and-salt brine should be safe. But ya gotta thank those lawmakers...

candacethecook Posted 14 Mar 2013 , 4:31pm
post #9 of

I love your post and agree with the comment "what's left".  I make the Italian Cream cake with a cream cheese frosting between the layers and cover with all butter buttercream.  It's always great.  I would like to use the cream cheese frosting on the outside too but It's just not as stable as the buttecream.  Would you mind sharing your cream cheese icing recipe with me?

 

Also, I sometimes use LorAnn oil "cheesecake" flavoring in my buttercream icing to achieve the Cream Cheese Icing flavor effect for carrot cake and red velvet cakes as I sell cake at our local green market and the rule is, no cream cheese!  It taste pretty good.

 

Enjoy your baking!

 

Candace

candacethecook Posted 14 Mar 2013 , 4:35pm

LorAnn Oils has a cheesecake flavoring that is an excellent substitute for cream cheese frosting.

 

Candace

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