owatto Posted 3 Sep 2012 , 10:48pm
post #1 of

I'm a little confused with decorators glitter. I have all these little pots of glitter that cost over $10 each (in Australia) and I've just noticed theyre non toxic but not edible. Why are we paying so much for this glitter that isn't edible when I could get a kilogram of the same colour from a craft shop. Is there something special about this decorators glitter that makes it easier for cakes?

6 replies
heatonscakes Posted 3 Sep 2012 , 11:17pm
post #2 of

You can't use this decorator's glitter on cakes in the UK. It is not edible.

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Sep 2012 , 11:38pm
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by owatto

I'm a little confused with decorators glitter. I have all these little pots of glitter that cost over $10 each (in Australia) and I've just noticed theyre non toxic but not edible. Why are we paying so much for this glitter that isn't edible when I could get a kilogram of the same colour from a craft shop. Is there something special about this decorators glitter that makes it easier for cakes?




The type of glitter--"disco" dust, and other names--is fine grain PLASTIC craft glitter. No, there's nothing special about it. It's not toxic, but it is NOT edible. It's for "decoration only", just as a plastic decorative pick would be. It should only be used on items that will be removed before consuming.

I honestly have no idea why it was EVER introduced as something for cake decorating. I'm appalled and disgusted when I see people sprinkling it liberally on cupcakes, cookies, cakes, etc. I have NO desire to knowingly introduce plastic as part of my ingredients list...........

Rae

sugarbabybakes Posted 13 Sep 2012 , 7:00am
post #4 of

Not sure you can find this in Australia, but Wilton makes edible glittericon_sad.gifhttp://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=36A607AB-1E0B-C910-EA8977647A58A212&fid=36A60819-1E0B-C910-EAAE4C2FF5609C49)

and pearl dust (http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?sku=pg_pearldust)

Hope that helps!
Sugar Baby @ sugarbabybakes.blogspot.com

Claire138 Posted 13 Sep 2012 , 7:04am
post #5 of

Rae- I've never understood this either & don't use it.

artgal Posted 16 Sep 2012 , 6:29pm
post #6 of

Ever heard of Julie Bayshore? She sells edible glitter at her web site, I believe it's called sugarart or something like that. We use it at the Bakery.

BlakesCakes Posted 16 Sep 2012 , 6:47pm
post #7 of

I'm sorry, but I've seen Julie's product and I firmly believe it to be DISCO DUST. It looks and acts the same way. I know what she says--and I know what her website says--but I think it's inaccurate. I see no ingredients list for the product.

This stuff originally came by way of a British company called, "Edable Art"--the company's founder's name is "Ed"--and people thought it meant that it was "edible". It's not--it's only non-toxic.

Edible glitter is made from gum arabic--a food product--and therefore has "ingredients".

I would love nothing more than to be proved incorrect. Everyone would like to find a product that is as sparkly as disco dust, but is actually edible........

Rae

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