Decorating Gloves... Anyone?

Decorating By DiddleMeSweet Updated 26 Aug 2012 , 1:53pm by BakingIrene

DiddleMeSweet Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 4:13am
post #1 of 16

I saw on Sweet Wise that they had decorating gloves. I was wondering if anyone uses gloves and what kind. I am seriously considering purchasing them, but I would love to hear your thoughts.

Here's the link on their site: http://sweetwise.com/content/video/#page=1&id=14

15 replies
scp1127 Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 5:59am
post #2 of 16

When I clicked on the video, it said it was private.

cheatize Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 6:20am
post #3 of 16

It won't let me view the video and I can't find the product on their site. When I have to do a lot of piping, I use gloves meant for sewing. They do help some and they are washable.

FlourPots Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 7:37am
post #4 of 16

Here's the gloves featured in the video: http://sweetwise.com/vinyl-decorating-gloves-lg-100-bx.html

They're available in small & medium also.

LisaPeps Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 8:30am
post #5 of 16

You don't need to be extorted by her for "decorating gloves" all you need is food grade vinyl gloves (ie powder free)

http://www.google.co.uk/#hl=en&sclient=psy-ab&q=food+grade+vinyl+gloves&oq=food+grade+vinyl+gl&gs_l=hp.3.0.0.285.3839.0.5023.19.13.0.6.6.0.77.716.12.12.0...0.0...1c.Ct8BHKU90p8&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=cc8ce0f1d9587aff&biw=1366&bih=667

http://www.esafetysupplies.com/General-Food-Grade-Gloves/

All you need to do is make sure they fit you properly. I wear smalls, and that way I have no wrinkles in the gloves which transfer to fondant.

DiddleMeSweet Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 10:00am
post #6 of 16

Ok. Thank you everyone.

@LisaPeps not sure to whom your referring to, but I am considering purchasing gloves. Since I am new to cake baking I myself have done some research. When I can't seem to find it I ask here @ cake central. I really wanted to hear what others used NOT "extort" anyone. If what they used was food safe or not, where they get them, do they work? I am not in anyway trying to influence anyone. Just merely trying to see what is best and what other peoples opinions are. Especially when I find something online...I simply want to see if anyone else is using it or similar.
Have a good day!

LisaPeps Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 10:53am
post #7 of 16

@DiddleMeSweet I was merely stating that Streetwise's price for the gloves was extortionate considering that she is charging $14.29 for 100 gloves that's 14 cents per glove, that is hugely expensive.

Sugarsweetcafe Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 5:58pm
post #8 of 16

Lisa is right. She didnt mean any harm she just doesnt want to see you spend 15 dollars on something you can get 2 dollars a box icon_smile.gif

They're other things you need to watch out for. You can be spending alot of money on cake stuff when there's good alternatives. For example Petal dust. Alot of us grind up chalk pastel and you'll be saving yourself a TON of money, unless of coarse you want it edible and there is a brand of edible color dust.

Just be careful to not get sucked into some products that they sell for insane prices like those decorating gloves icon_wink.gif

FlourPots Posted 12 Aug 2012 , 6:14pm
post #9 of 16

...and don't forget shipping charges.

It would cost $8.43 (or $10.45 for UPS) to ship those gloves to me in Florida. Ouch!


When you only need one small item for an upcoming project and can't find it locally(dust, gel coloring etc.) The best alternative is ebay.
You can buy brand new, unopened items with VERY low shipping.
ALL the major cake supply sites charge way more than the actual cost of the item.

lkern777 Posted 13 Aug 2012 , 1:15am
post #10 of 16

The gloves that Sweetwise sells are just medical gloves with aloe in them. Their price for the ones with aloe are competitive with other sellers online. If you get regular powder free gloves without the aloe they are much cheaper. If you Google "medline aloetouch 3G vinyl gloves" you can find other vendors and see that the price is not "extortionist".

Go to www.webstaurantstore.com and get powder free vinyl gloves and they are about $3.50/box of 100, plus shipping.

John at Sweetwise gave me a couple of pairs to try and they are nice, but I won't pay extra for the vinyl.

BlakesCakes Posted 14 Aug 2012 , 10:59pm
post #11 of 16

I despise using gloves, but I have very small hands, so even size S can be too big.

I was wearing gloves once and after coloring 5 lbs. of fondant pink, I noticed that THE TIP OF THUMB ON MY LEFT GLOVE WAS MISSING icon_eek.gif so, out went 5lbs. and $$$$ of fondant......so, I've never used them again.

I find that if I crisco my hands all the way up to the wrists, the color is easily washed away when I'm finished.

I don't see gloves as "necessary" when coloring or kneading fondant----I don't know anyone who makes breads/rolls or pasta dough wearing gloves. I just keep my nails very short & wash my hands frequently and well.

I do use non-powdered latex gloves when pulling sugar. I find that with a thin pair of chocolate handling gloves under a pair of small latex gloves, I get great results.

Rae

Pyro Posted 15 Aug 2012 , 9:08pm
post #12 of 16

I don't know for other regions, but where I live you can't make food with latex gloves or gloves that have latex powder in them. If someone is alergic to latex and you handle their food, someday something bad could happen. More and more people are becoming alergic to latex too.

Nitrile gloves are just a tad more expensive then latex, they are easy to recognise they come in almost any color buy transparent white ( latex ). They are also more resistant.

Even if you wear gloves you need good hand sanitation.


@BlakesCakes : I feel you, I've seen too many broken gloves to care to use them too often, god knows when those things rip appart, you can never be completely sure you got every bit.


Edit: Also I buy my gloves at my local pharmacy, no need to go to extremes to get gloves, they sell those pretty much everywhere nowadays, ask around.

lkern777 Posted 15 Aug 2012 , 11:51pm
post #13 of 16

"John at Sweetwise gave me a couple of pairs to try and they are nice, but I won't pay extra for the vinyl."

I meant to say that I won't pay extra for the aloe.

DiddleMeSweet Posted 16 Aug 2012 , 10:42am
post #14 of 16

Thank you for your responses...I'll stick with plain hands and grease...

DiddleMeSweet Posted 26 Aug 2012 , 12:04pm
post #15 of 16

Well, I thought I could stick with just plain hands however Arizona's version of the Cottage Food Law called Home Baked and Confectionery Goods (in my county) requires that I wear gloves. I suggest anyone who does bake check their states Cottage Food Law. I also have to purchase labels, get a food handlers card (which requires to be renewed every 3 years), and I must register myself. So now I am studying for a test...

BakingIrene Posted 26 Aug 2012 , 1:53pm
post #16 of 16

Look for powder-free vinyl (clear) or nitrile (opaque) gloves in your local pharmacy. Test the size as some brands run very small and some are proper L and XL for those of use who need the room. They should cost no more than $8 per 100.

It's harder to find powder-free latex but they are also available. They might cost more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugarsweetcafe

They're other things you need to watch out for. You can be spending alot of money on cake stuff when there's good alternatives. For example Petal dust. Alot of us grind up chalk pastel and you'll be saving yourself a TON of money, unless of coarse you want it edible and there is a brand of edible color dust.




Sorry but petal dust is NOT chalk pastel or even edible chalk. It has gum as well as sugar and colour so that when you steam the flowers, the dust sets properly.
The powdered food colours are VERY concentrated, like paste, and NOT useful to substitute for petal dust. Not even if you mix with cornstarch.

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