dawnybird Posted 4 Aug 2012 , 11:15pm
post #1 of

I have seen many cakes that were described as mud cakes here in the gallery. I searched recipes and there seems to be a lot of variation. What makes something a mud cake, and can anyone recommend a good recipe for it? Since I don't know what it's supposed to be like, I don't know which recipe to choose. I take it you can make a white choc. or dark chocolate flavor?
Thanks, guys!

55 replies
Evoir Posted 4 Aug 2012 , 11:55pm
post #2 of

You can make much more than those three! I have over 20 varieties on offer to my clients icon_biggrin.gif

Basically, a mud cake is very dense, has a tight crumb, does not crumb when you cut it, and carves best of any cake type. They ALL have melted chocolate in them.

A mud cake is made by mixing your liquids into your dry ingredients. You melt chocolate, butter, and your other liquids (eg coconut milk) in a saucepan, then add to your flour and cocoa and sugar etc.

Hope this helps. When looking for a recipe to try, I'd recommend using an Australian recipe - simply because they are our stock in trade, so we know our mud cakes icon_smile.gif

Start with a google search for Australian Women's Weekly.

kelleym Posted 5 Aug 2012 , 1:20am
post #3 of

Sounds somewhat like an American brownie.

dawnybird Posted 5 Aug 2012 , 3:34am
post #4 of

Thanks, Evoir. I'll do some googling and see what I can find!

cheatize Posted 5 Aug 2012 , 3:47am
post #5 of

This may seem obvious to other people, but when the recipes on the Australian Women's Weekly site says, "whisk" does it really mean to whisk it or does it mean to mix it?

Chellescakes Posted 5 Aug 2012 , 4:08am
post #6 of

Cheatize , I use a whisk to mix my mudcakes with, I find that it combines the wet and dry together better.

Evoir Posted 6 Aug 2012 , 7:46am
post #7 of

I use a whisk too icon_smile.gif

Chellescakes Posted 6 Aug 2012 , 11:15am
post #8 of

another important thing to know about a mudcake is that they should never be eaten fresh. I never cut mine until at least the third day . I usually bake monday or Tuesday for a Saturday wedding . They are usually good to eat two weeks after the wedding unrefrigerated. I ganache and fondant my cakes.

Bluehue Posted 6 Aug 2012 , 3:05pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chellescakes

another important thing to know about a mudcake is that they should never be eaten fresh. I never cut mine until at least the third day . I usually bake monday or Tuesday for a Saturday wedding . They are usually good to eat two weeks after the wedding unrefrigerated. I ganache and fondant my cakes.





dawnybird - great to freeze also - the cake doesn't get that *i've just been frozen and thawed* taste about it - as some can.
Bluehue

srkmilklady Posted 6 Aug 2012 , 3:18pm

I just watched this on Youtube..."How to make Chocolate Mud Cake". For those of you that do make it, can you comment on whether this would be a good recipe to use?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNjeEx92rTA

Thanks!! icon_smile.gif

Chellescakes Posted 6 Aug 2012 , 10:06pm

yep that is a pretty standard mud recipe, however I would add a tablespoon of instant coffee into the wet mix .

I also just let it cool in the saucepan and then add my dry ingredients into there , why wash up another bowl when it isn't necessary.

cheatize Posted 7 Aug 2012 , 3:49am

Thanks for the answers! I printed a couple of recipes to try some day when I have the time.

linnod Posted 31 May 2013 , 11:49pm

Do you have a good recipe for mud cake?

WeekendBaking Posted 21 Jun 2013 , 7:34am

Hi everyone!

 

I've been reading all about mud cakes and was wondering, are mud cakes and fudge cakes the same? How are they different if not? I've made a fudge cake before that for some reason didn't become fudgy until after a few days, am thinking of trying out a mud cake as I need a good sturdy cake I can carve...

Carrie789 Posted 21 Jun 2013 , 9:01am

Here is an updated video of Nicko's mud cake listed above last August.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_490021&feature=iv&src_vid=qNjeEx92rTA&v=hrzXdVP5mHw

 

My question to Australian bakers is about the use of both plain flour and self-raising flours. What is the advantage of using the combination rather than one or the other?
 

Evoir Posted 21 Jun 2013 , 11:36am

AIt's just a way to get limited raising. To create the mud texture.

You can substitute the plain+SR Mixture with all plain/AP + a reduced amount of baking powder to what you'd usually use to make self-raising flour (2 tsps baking powder to 1 metric cup plain flour).

Spooky_789 Posted 21 Jun 2013 , 9:23pm

Do you normally fill a mud cake?

Goreti Posted 21 Jun 2013 , 9:58pm

I do fill my mud cakes.  As far as recipes, there are some nice ones listed here:  http://cakecentral.com/t/726071/august-scratch-off-mud-cake

vonscakes87 Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 7:24pm

AI made a mud cake before and I loved it,first time I made it it came out perfect,2nd time it overflowed and sank in the middle.the recipe I found I believe came from Australia because of the conversions.it was difficult for me at first.but I made a caramel one and it was heavenly.i like that it taste better after it sits for a day or two.it freezes very well.i had a friend of mine freeze the cake I made for him and we tried it at week intervals.i believe the longest it survived in his freezer was a month and a half..i couldn't help but use the excuse "I need to sample it and make sure its still good!!"we even at it still slightly frozen and it was to die for!!!I say go for it!!!:D

linnod Posted 4 Nov 2013 , 1:48pm

Need your help!   I tried a chocolate mud cake recipe twice from Nicko's Kitchen whick was displayed on u tube. The first one came out of the oven still wet and sloshy in the pan so I thought I did something wrong and tried again. But nope the second one came out the same way. I even tried baking it longer. Once done they came out like a Brownie. Definitely not cake like. Very heavy,thick Brownie. Is that how mud cakes are, Brownie like? 

linnod Posted 4 Nov 2013 , 2:08pm

I tried Nickos Kitchen mud cake and it definitely came out like what we call a brownie.. didn't care for it. I think because I was expecting a dense moist cake. NOT BROWNIE. :(

vonscakes87 Posted 5 Nov 2013 , 8:09pm

A

Original message sent by linnod

I tried Nickos Kitchen mud cake and it definitely came out like what we call a brownie.. didn't care for it. I think because I was expecting a dense moist cake. NOT BROWNIE. :(

I would say try another recipe. altho I have never heard of or tried that particular recipe,i would say mud cake does not taste or have the texture of brownies what so ever.i despise brownies for that simple reason,the texture.i hate that gooeyness just bleh!texture.I HATE BROWNIES!!!..but,i wouldn't say the texture of mud cake is again,any resemblance to a brownie..so just find another recipe.i am going to search later today and see if I can find the recipe I used,and post it here.maybe its the same,maybe its different..but don't give up!!

ApplegumPam Posted 5 Nov 2013 , 8:23pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by linnod 
 

I tried Nickos Kitchen mud cake and it definitely came out like what we call a brownie.. didn't care for it. I think because I was expecting a dense moist cake. NOT BROWNIE. :(



The recipe you have used -  has TWICE the amount of sugar in it as mine..... THIS fact alone would have made it like a brownie!!

 

linnod Posted 6 Nov 2013 , 8:45pm

I would love to try Pam's mud cake but could someone give me the ingredients in gram weights rather than cups. I know they differ from UK to US. Also, the recipe says to bake at 150?C What is the question mark referring to?

IAmPamCakes Posted 6 Nov 2013 , 8:47pm

AThere are conversion charts online, to change volume to weight (or vice versa). Look around, and maybe you'll find a great recipe. I don't know that Pam shares her personal recipes.

ApplegumPam Posted 6 Nov 2013 , 9:13pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by linnod 
 

I would love to try Pam's mud cake but could someone give me the ingredients in gram weights rather than cups. I know they differ from UK to US. Also, the recipe says to bake at 150?C What is the question mark referring to?


The recipe is in my signature - the formatting of the recipe got 'corrupted' during one of the many CC 'upgrades'

There is a better TYPED version - with proper formatting - on my FB page..... ALSO IN MY SIGNATURE

I don't want to be rude linnod but can't think of a politer way of saying this......

 

You are given a recipe ....for FREE  -  ummm do what everybody else does.... WORK it out for yourself - for goodness sake it really isn't rocket science,  there are online converters everywhere - I even posted a whole host of tips for the recipe - it is here on CC - YOU can search for that.

Oh... and the ?????  - it was originally a DEGREE sign  - so it is BAKE AT 150degrees C  -  that 'C' stands for CELCIUS - it is what most of the world uses to measure temperature - you can also find temperature converters on line too

IF this is all too hard for you......  bake an American Brownie

linnod Posted 6 Nov 2013 , 10:00pm

Wow, I am truly sorry for asking .And yes you are VERY RUDE!  I will  definitely rethink asking or posting anything on  Cake Central again. I hope you can get through your days better. 

kikiandkyle Posted 6 Nov 2013 , 10:06pm

AActually Linnod it's rude when people help you out and you call them RUDE instead of apologizing and thanking them for giving you their recipes.

JWinslow Posted 6 Nov 2013 , 10:16pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by linnod 
 

Wow, I am truly sorry for asking .And yes you are VERY RUDE!  I will  definitely rethink asking or posting anything on  Cake Central again. I hope you can get through your days better. 


No, No!  This is wrong.  There is a level of frustration you are not acknowledging.  I have been  following this thread from the beginning and have not posted until now.  The members have been trying to give you the benefit of their knowledge but at some point you just have to jump in with both feet and do some research on your own.  You will be better for it and learn much more than having every piece to a puzzle handed to you.

 

Jeanne

MimiFix Posted 6 Nov 2013 , 10:25pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikiandkyle 

Actually Linnod it's rude when people help you out and you call them RUDE instead of apologizing and thanking them for giving you their recipes.

ApplegumPam is very generous with her time and always willing to share recipes. We should all be thankful that she's a regular member. 

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