Marzipan Under Fondant?

Decorating By Sherri2012 Updated 3 Aug 2012 , 9:15pm by BlakesCakes

Sherri2012 Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 5:20pm
post #1 of 13

Hello. Hope you are having a good day! icon_smile.gif My question is about when to use marzipan? I LOVE the flavor of it, but have personally never used it. I'm brand spanking new to making cakes, so don't know much other than what I have found researching in books from the local library and on web sites. - I am confused about marzipan. Is it not popular in the USA? Is it something they use in other places, like the folks down under use chocolate ganache ( sp?) instead of buttercream? I have seen some books say they always apply a layer of ganache, then marzipan, then fondant.

If you use marzipan does it affect your price? Do you have a good recipe for it?

I have tried making my own, but couldn't get all the skins off the almonds fast enough after blanching them. Even the ones that did come off , still had one little spot of brown skin left. It was a pain. I ground them anyways, and ended up with an off white powder with tiny brown specks. But, I really like the flavor and want to use it in my cakes. Thing is, I'm not going to buy pre made fondant or marzipan at this point. I like the idea of sticking with it being made fresh from scratch.

Thanks for telling me anything you want to about marzipan! icon_biggrin.gif I appreciate everyone on Cake Central!

12 replies
shanter Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 5:26pm
post #2 of 13

One hint: buy blanched almonds (skins already removed). If you can't find them locally, try www.nuts.com. I get a lot of nuts from them. There are usually slivered blanched almonds in the grocery store, but to get enough to make marzipan, it would be prohibitively expensive because they are bagged in tiny amounts.

leah_s Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 5:33pm
post #3 of 13

've put marzipan under fondant, but only in culinary school. Yes it ups the cost tremendously. And sooo many people here in the US seem to avoid nuts.

Sherri2012 Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 5:51pm
post #4 of 13

Shanter, thank you for the link. They are 6.99 a pound there... for blanched almond flour, too. Not bad.

Leah, Yeah I know what you mean about people here not into nuts. I think it is one thing I want to know how to do, though, because the flavor is so good! For some people it might be worth it. At least one or two tiers? Or, they may like to have several dozen marzipan mini cakes or a small birthday cake.

Thanks for your help.

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 6:48pm
post #5 of 13

Marzipan is used under fondant on fruit cakes, not on standard American style cakes.

Are you going to be making a lot of fruit cakes?

Marzipan is not going to be the expected/accepted "icing" under fondant here in the US.

Given that fondant is begrudgingly accepted by many, I can't see a resoundingly good response to fondant AND marzipan on an American cake. I know I'd be really unhappy.

My clients want a full layer of BC under their fondant so that when they DON'T eat the fondant, they still have their cake & icing.

Marzipan is great for modeling certain items.

Rae

Sherri2012 Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 7:41pm
post #6 of 13

Blakes Cakes, Yeah...I don't know how I would like buttercream, marzipan and fondant... That would be an awful lot, plus, super heavy! But, I have read in many of the cake decorating books from my local library, that is what the authors do.

Does marzipan hold up like fondant? Can you paint it? Does it dry like fondant does?

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 7:55pm
post #7 of 13

Well, no....... it's not common for BC+marzipan+fondant--in any place in the world.

I'd guess that many of the library books are British classics and the marzipan is ONLY used on fruitcakes that will be covered in ROYAL icing OR fondant. It's used to seal in the moisture of the soaked fruitcake and to even out the bumpiness of a well made fruitcake that contains raisins, nuts, etc.

Marzipan is a very different animal than fondant. On a fruitcake, it's usually put on as a strip around the perimeter and then a disc on the top. It doesn't roll out like fondant. It can be dyed, but painting can be tricky because it's heavy in nut oils. It gets a crust on it after a time, but can be heat affected and the oils again rise to the surface.

Marzipan is not a common element in the US and many people are not only unfamiliar with the taste & texture, but also with the very high cost of a quality product.

Colette Peters mixes marzipan with fondant--she calls it "marzifon"-- to make an almond flavored fondant. In this case, it is put on a BC iced cake as the final outer icing.

Rae

Sherri2012 Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 8:04pm
post #8 of 13

Rae, thanks for the information. Yeah, I can see where it would be used to even out a bumpy fruit cake. makes sense. I'll have to check out the marzipan flavored fondant. - Thanks again!

ibeeflower Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 8:06pm
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Marzipan is used under fondant on fruit cakes, not on standard American style cakes.

Are you going to be making a lot of fruit cakes?

Marzipan is not going to be the expected/accepted "icing" under fondant here in the US.

Given that fondant is begrudgingly accepted by many, I can't see a resoundingly good response to fondant AND marzipan on an American cake. I know I'd be really unhappy.

My clients want a full layer of BC under their fondant so that when they DON'T eat the fondant, they still have their cake & icing.

Marzipan is great for modeling certain items.

Rae




I've seen many bakers recommend ganache under fondant and it's rare for me to see one who uses buttercream under fondant (at least online anyway). Local bakeries in my area use BC under fondant too.

So I wonder if I should use BC or ganache under my fondant.

Sherri2012 Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 8:27pm
post #10 of 13

ibee, I think both are fine. Just a matter of taste, mostly. I think I have heard that ganache is more durable. ( sturdy) But, a good crusting buttercream, if made with crisco can withstand higher temperatures than if made with all butter. My sisters wedding reception a few weeks ago was in 90 plus degree weather and the buttercream ( half Crisco and half butter) I used held up nicely.

Pearl645 Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 8:58pm
post #11 of 13

Marzipan is most widely used in the Caribbean and UK. I use a lot of marzipan because we do a lot of fruit cakes for wedding cakes. I was taught it was for use on fruit cakes only. It serves many purposes - holds in the liquid from a fruit cake and prevents it from leaking through to the fondant, adds a fantastic rich almond taste and is a firm casing for applying fondant. I have never used marzipan on any other cake other than fruit. It is extremely expensive to make. I buy the 8 oz can of Almond paste and I use a recipe from an old Wilton book back in the 80s I believe. You can freeze home-made marzipan in an airtight container or bag for months. It has alcohol in it along with egg yolks, corn syrup, etc. Our fruit cakes are very rich with alcohol so we use marzipan to cap it in. Otherwise it can be a wet mess when decorating with.

Sherri2012 Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 9:13pm
post #12 of 13

Thank you for the information!

icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 3 Aug 2012 , 9:15pm
post #13 of 13

I think you'll find here, on CC, that many people use BC under fondant--I certainly do. Many Australians use ganache, exclusively.

I use crusting BC or a meringue BC, depending on the circumstances of the cake, it's delivery, it's design, the flavors of the cake & filling, the customer's choice, the temp. of the final display spot for the cake, etc. Either work just fine.

Chocolate & butter both melt at lower temps than high ratio shortening, so that come into play. Cost can also be a factor.

Rae

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