FromScratchSF Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 3:41am
post #1 of

So a month or so ago I was invited to attend a Nicholas Lodge demo with Albert Uster. He debuted his brand new line of fondant, called FondArt.

Disclaimer, I use Carma Massa Ticino. I've sampled Alber Uster's fondant previously (all of them) and I hated them as much as Satin Ice. I think both Satin Ice and Albert Uster's fondant taste foul.

So I was very skeptical, but I trust Nicholas Lodge. Let me tell you, this stuff tastes just like homemade marshmallow fondant. It has a spring-y-ness that those that use his gumpaste recipe will recognize and it rolls really nice. It also comes in several colors and here's the HURRAY! part - it comes in jewel colors and black. The black has only a very faint chemical taste. I mean, it's faint! And it's a true black. I covered 2 tiers with it, and although it was a little different then I was used to, it was great. It also stayed somewhat soft! It didn't get that dried-out gummy-ness that fondant gets.

It's also hella cheap compared to AI's "higher quality" fondant lines, and I think about the same price as Satin Ice.

I am in no way affiliated with Albert Uster or Chef Lodge, I just wanted to share that there is a new kid on the playground and that kid is AWESOME!

http://www.auiswisscatalogue.com/639001/1-ENRO.html

I am hard-pressed giving up my Massa Ticino, but I'll never buy a tub of black Satin Ice again.

28 replies
FromScratchSF Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 3:43am
post #2 of

PS they will be selling at ICES and Chef Nicholas will be doing the same demo (I think it will be the same).

sillywabbitz Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 3:48am
post #3 of

This is great news. Now to convince me cake store to carry iticon_smile.gif

DivaJai Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 5:10am
post #4 of

Thanks for the review thumbs_up.gif

Tina2002 Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 1:13pm
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I just got some red FondArt from AU but have not had a chance to taste it. But the gumpaste from AU tasted so good. Usually, you don't want to taste the gumpaste because some of them taste awful, but I cannot stop tasting the AU's gumpaste.

Pearl645 Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 1:16pm
post #6 of

Wish I could get this here. All we have is Wilton and Satin Ice rolled fondant. I actually didn't realize so many people hated the taste of SI until I reached here. You made me happy to hear about a new brand but then I'm like..this isn't coming here anytime soon. Will keep my fingers crossed stores start carrying it. Thanks for this review.

HappyCake10609 Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 1:29pm
post #7 of

I actually got samples of several of the AU fondants and FondArt was one of them. I haven't had a chance to do much experimenting with them... but I agree the taste is not bad... it does have a REALLY stretchy quality to it, it is very very different than Satin Ice.

*The label also reads that it "resists condensation" for those concerned about refrigerating fondant covered cakes (I currently use SI and don't have a problem).

vgcea Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 1:59pm
post #8 of

This stretchy-ness , does it translate to a chewier fondant? What's the mouth-feel like?

cakecraving Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 2:32pm
post #9 of

Thanks for the great info. Cant wait to try it icon_smile.gif Can I order sample packs or do I have to order a tub (if you know)

FromScratchSF Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 3:24pm

It's not chewy, it's been a while since I've made MMF, but I think it has the same mouthfeel (and flavor). The stretch is also the same, so it does tear a bit easier then what I'm used to working with, it really has almost a homemade feel. But comparing it to Satin Ice (black), I thought it was much easier to work with because it wasn't crumbly and it didn't elephant skin like I am used to when using SI black, despite the constant humidity I live in. It also didn't dye my rolling pin and table red like SI black always does. I rolled some white right after and it didn't pick up any color. I covered a 6" tall wonky ganached super sharp corner cake, and was successful after 1 try of rolling 1/8" thick and stretching to 1/16".

It comes in 2.2 pound bricks and retails for a little over $7. No sample packs, at the demo I went ahead and justbought one of every color except white, set me back a whole $35 bucks (they were out of blue). So far extremely happy. I have made all kinds of decorations - I ran the red thru my clay extruder to make tiny tiny shoe laces for a 1" fondant running shoe cupcake topper. It extruded wonderfully, didn't stick or crumble, and I was able to actually put it on the shoe cris-cross like a real shoe lace. I normally would have used gumpaste. I also ran it thru my KA pasta attachment on 5 to make tappits letters. Again, I normally would have used gumpaste - but it worked beautifully.

It did get sticky sitting overnight in my very damp walk-in, but it dried out just as nice and just as fast as the Massa Ticino on the tier under it. So if you are used to working in high humidity and already deal with sticky fondant, it's no different.

DanaG21 Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 3:36pm

I agree! I was fortunate enough to visit AUI in May when I was in Maryland and got to bring some home. I just bought a white and black since I was travelling. 2.2lbs is $7.17 for white and the colors are $7.72. I just did a cake with the white the other night and my friend just started eating the fondant because it was so delicious. It is stretchier and definitely has a "marshmallow" feel to me. I usually use Fondarific but am getting ready to order the FondArt for an outdoor wedding I have in August.

I'm anxious to see how the black performs - no fading, etc!

Tina2002 Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 6:08pm

Thanks for the info. I have an order of the spider man cake, so hopefully the FondArt red will be good, since I cannot taste the SI red fondant.
FS, Have you tried AU's chocolate fondant? Is it good?

FromScratchSF Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 6:24pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tina2002

Thanks for the info. I have an order of the spider man cake, so hopefully the FondArt red will be good, since I cannot taste the SI red fondant.
FS, Have you tried AU's chocolate fondant? Is it good?




Yes I have and I don't love it. But I'm really, really picky. If someone wants chocolate fondant I make my own using real chocolate (Michelle Foster's recipe). I have yet to find a brand of pre-made that I would put on one of my cakes to sell.

icer101 Posted 30 Jul 2012 , 6:47pm

thanks for your time and the great info.

vgcea Posted 31 Jul 2012 , 1:44am

Thank you so much for this information!

jason_kraft Posted 31 Jul 2012 , 2:28am

FYI this may not be safe for people with allergies. According to the site below:

Quote:
Quote:

This product is prepared and packaged using machines that may come into contact with Wheat/Gluten, Eggs, Dairy or Dairy Products, Peanuts, Tree Nuts and Soy.




http://www.countrykitchensa.com/shop/food-items/fondart-rolled-fondant-yellow/46/532/1015/640927/

BlakesCakes Posted 31 Jul 2012 , 2:41am

I had the pleasure of using FondArt recently, too. I'm in total agreement with the OP. It's really great stuff.

It has all of the best qualities of mixing Wilton (for workability) with FondX or Fondarific (for taste)--and the price is reasonable.

If shipping is an issue, go in with a friend and make up an order of $195 and it will all ship free.

http://www.auiswisscatalogue.com/2-Fond/FondArt+Rolled+Fondants.html

Rae

kelsiedelizzle Posted 30 Aug 2012 , 10:32pm

From the reviews I'm hearing, this sounds similar to Fondarific, only a lot cheaper. Has anyone done any comparisons between FondArt and Fondarific?

BlakesCakes Posted 30 Aug 2012 , 10:48pm

It's really nothing like Fondarific--which I've used. The only similarity that I see is that FondAart doesn't form a stiff "skin" very quickly, so it has a longer working time than some other fondants.

Fondarific is candy melt based (so it acts more like a mixture of fondant & modeling chocolate) is very high in fats compared to regular fondants, and is basically unaffected by adding tylose/cmc to it in order to affect drying and hardening.

FondArt is more like a perfect marshmallow fondant mixed with a perfect commercial fondant, with all of the best qualities of both for taste and workability. It's much lighter (in weight) than Fondarific and can be rolled much thinner (and on shortening--which I use--rather than PS or CS).

I think of Fondarific as being great for "some" applications. I think of FondArt as being great for MOST (if not ALL) applications. It's also much cheaper than Fondarific.

JMHO
Rae

cheatize Posted 30 Aug 2012 , 10:58pm

Can you add tylose or gum-tex to it and have it stiffen/harden?

kelsiedelizzle Posted 30 Aug 2012 , 10:59pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

It's really nothing like Fondarific--which I've used. The only similarity that I see is that FondAart doesn't form a stiff "skin" very quickly, so it has a longer working time than some other fondants.

Fondarific is candy melt based (so it acts more like a mixture of fondant & modeling chocolate) is very high in fats compared to regular fondants, and is basically unaffected by adding tylose/cmc to it in order to affect drying and hardening.

FondArt is more like a perfect marshmallow fondant mixed with a perfect commercial fondant, with all of the best qualities of both for taste and workability. It's much lighter (in weight) than Fondarific and can be rolled much thinner (and on shortening--which I use--rather than PS or CS).

I think of Fondarific as being great for "some" applications. I think of FondArt as being great for MOST (if not ALL) applications. It's also much cheaper than Fondarific.

JMHO
Rae




thanks for the review, Rae! Next time I'm at Nicolas Lodge's shop, I'll pick up a few pounds and try it out myself! I can't believe how much cheaper it is. The thinnest I've ever rolled out fondant is with Fondarific, so I can't wait to see what Fondart can do! icon_smile.gif

BlakesCakes Posted 30 Aug 2012 , 11:08pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheatize

Can you add tylose or gum-tex to it and have it stiffen/harden?




Yes.

FromScratchSF Posted 31 Aug 2012 , 4:00am

Yes you can, but I had to add a LOT of tylose. I think Chef Nicholas said 1 tsp. tylose to 100 grams of Fondart.

BlakesCakes Posted 31 Aug 2012 , 4:38am

Wow, a tsp. to 3.5 ounces of fondant? That is a lot!
For comparison, I generally add a tsp. to 8 ounces of Satin Ice.........or a tsp. to a POUND of Wilton........

When I added tylose to FondArt, I just eyeballed it, but then again, I wasn't making flowers, or figures, with it. I just needed it a bit stiffer.

I get the sense that with it's natural sponginess, it wouldn't be very heavy or saggy when making figures, so a little gum might go a long way. For bows, it would probably need more.

JMHO
Rae

FromScratchSF Posted 31 Aug 2012 , 4:46am

OOPS - just checked my notes - make that 150g of Fondant to 1/4 tsp. tylose.

BlakesCakes Posted 31 Aug 2012 , 4:55am
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF

OOPS - just checked my notes - make that 150g of Fondant to 1/4 tsp. tylose.




Thanks for the correction!

I'm a lot happier with 1/4 tsp. to 5.25 ounces of fondant, or about 3/4 tsp. to 1lb.!
Rae

cheatize Posted 1 Sep 2012 , 4:09am

Thanks for all the info! If I run across it somewhere, I'll be sure to pick it up.

mfruchey Posted 22 Oct 2012 , 3:35pm

Sorry to dig up an old thread, but how does this fondant compare to Massa Ticino Tropic for those who use it? Is MTT still the best by far, or is this a close race?

Brasilianbaker Posted 2 Apr 2013 , 3:42am

ADoes anyone have any problems with the fondant having lots of holes in it? I use Satin Ice and don't have that problem. Can anyone give me any advice?

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