Wedding Cupcakes

Baking By momof6 Updated 11 Jul 2012 , 1:20pm by pmarks0

momof6 Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 3:17pm
post #1 of 6

I made these cupcakes for a wedding recently.......they are lemon cake with lemon custard filling
Chocolate cake with raspberry filling, White cake with strawberry filling,Chocolate cake with peanut butter filling and Yellow cake with chocolate filling. Each cupcake had a gum-paste Gerber daisy and the center of the flower corresponds to the flavor of the cupcake. The top is a 8" round, chocolate with peanut butter frosting. I delivered and set up......frosting the cupcakes there so they didn't get smooshed. I charged $400.00. Is the a reasonable price??
LL

5 replies
letsgetcaking Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 3:43pm
post #2 of 6

How many cupcakes did you make?

momof6 Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 5:14pm
post #3 of 6

Sorry......didn't notice I forgot to mention that...lol.....I made 150 cupcakes and the 8" layer on top.

pmarks0 Posted 10 Jul 2012 , 9:50pm
post #4 of 6

I think you're a tad low, although not too bad. Based on the 8" serving 24, I would have priced that at $3/serving, and rouning up, it would be $75. Taking your price, that leaves $325 for the cupcakes which works out to $2.15/cupcake. In your area, that may be the going rate. But because you had five flavours, with five different fillings, and they each had a colour coordinated daisy on top, I would have probably charged $3/cupcake. I normally charge $2.50 for a basic swirtl. So, that would bring the order to $525. But pricing is really dependent on your area and what it can support price-wise.

letsgetcaking Posted 11 Jul 2012 , 11:18am
post #5 of 6

I like the way pmarks0 broke it down. That shows how much you charged per serving. It sounds reasonable to me from the customer's standpoint.

You can figure out if you are charging enough for yourself, too.

How much did you spend on ingredients?
How much did you spend on other materials (plastic wrap, paper towels, cupcake liners, cost of gas, etc)?
How much time did you spend baking, cleaning, decorating, making gum paste flowers, transporting, etc...?

I think a lot of bakers have undercharged at one time or another because they didn't think of time as part of the cost. Say you spent $200 on ingredients and materials, that leaves you with $200 dollars for your time. If you spent 10 hours on EVERYTHING, you're making $20 an hour. If you spent 30 hours of your time on the order, you're making under $7 an hour.

pmarks0 Posted 11 Jul 2012 , 1:20pm
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by letsgetcaking


How much time did you spend baking, cleaning, decorating, making gum paste flowers, transporting, etc...?

I think a lot of bakers have undercharged at one time or another because they didn't think of time as part of the cost. Say you spent $200 on ingredients and materials, that leaves you with $200 dollars for your time. If you spent 10 hours on EVERYTHING, you're making $20 an hour. If you spent 30 hours of your time on the order, you're making under $7 an hour.




You have to look at the time you spent making them as a cost. So continuing with the example above, if you have $200 in ingredients, materials, utilities and insurance, that leaves you $200 for your time and profit. If you say you're paying yourself $10/hr and it takes you 10 hours, then your profit is $100 which is 25% of your price to the customer. Not a bad profit. However, if it took you 15 hours to make all the daisies and the cupcakes, then that's $150 leaving you with $50 profit which is 12.5%. And if you have decided that your hourly rate is $15/hr then the numbers change again.

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