Keeping Imbc From Separating.

Decorating By rosech Updated 9 Jul 2012 , 1:17pm by rosech

rosech Posted 8 Jul 2012 , 7:50am
post #1 of 10

Hi friends
I will be participating in a cake tasting affair on 14 July. The organisers said to bring bite size cake pieces wrapped in foil. I highlighted that it may not work out with fillings and frosting already applied. They said to wrap them plain then keep fillings/icings in containers. People will then scoop onto cake piece and taste. The reason being last year cakers spent too much time slicing and serving cake instead of interacting with potential customers. I have noticed that my IMBC tends to disintegrate when sitting for a while. When I am decorating something that takes time, I have to stir it from time to time. What to do? The event runs from 1000h to 1500h. Not sure how busy it will be to have the chance to stir plus I wanted to pipe it nicely into contaner for presentation.

9 replies
AnnieCahill Posted 8 Jul 2012 , 10:56am
post #2 of 10

Ok to me, that idea sounds like a cluster. That sounds like too many containers of filling and cake flying around. If it were me, I would do two or three cake combos filled and iced, then put them in little plastic containers with lids and labels. That way people can just grab and go.

What IMBC recipe are you using? I use the one from Warren Brown which you can find on YouTube. This lasts several days at room temperature with no breakdown. I usually keep it in the fridge anyway but I have left it out with no issues. I usually add about three tablespoons of vanilla. It takes flavors very well.

rosech Posted 8 Jul 2012 , 3:17pm
post #3 of 10

Thank u. I use a different recipe. Maybe that's why. Will try that one.

scp1127 Posted 8 Jul 2012 , 10:45pm
post #4 of 10

Mine never separates and I use a modified version of Annie's, but that one never separates.

You may want to calibrate your thermometer. Maybe that could be the culprit.

KoryAK Posted 8 Jul 2012 , 11:09pm
post #5 of 10

NO FOIL. I do all my event sampling in 2oz portion cups with lids. You can bake, fill, and ice big (thin) sheets of your cakes, slice, and put into the cups the day before. WAY better than cutting on site.

rosech Posted 9 Jul 2012 , 5:17am
post #6 of 10

My thermometer digits rubbed off. Must be something we washed with. I thot if I buy another, same thing may happen. Bn using a timer. Boiling syrup 5 mins then pour in. Maybe thats why it separates. On the cups issue, not sure on logistics of carrying about 300 pieces of each flavor. They said to bring 6 flavors. About 600 people attended last year.

scp1127 Posted 9 Jul 2012 , 6:39am
post #7 of 10

You really must have a thermometer or learn the old ball method. When you get your thermometer, Make a deep gouge into the 245 mark. Now you have a dedicated IMBC thermometer.

5 minutes is way too short on time. And if you do turn it up all the way, the crystals may not be melted. This is definitely your problem.

My numbers wear off too, but I sharpie 212 and 245. As I wash it, I note the wear and mark it again. Make sure the 212 stays in place by running the line on the metal and the glass.

rosech Posted 9 Jul 2012 , 7:00am
post #8 of 10

Thanx a bunch. Will do that.

BakingIrene Posted 9 Jul 2012 , 12:16pm
post #9 of 10

I don't like the idea of scooping from containers. VERY messy.

You can prepare thin sheets of your cakes, filled with either buttercream or ganache. These can be chilled, cut into 1" squares, and wrapped in plastic wrap if you don't want to spend the $$$ on cups. These neat cubes can be set on trays with cards showing the flavours.

rosech Posted 9 Jul 2012 , 1:17pm
post #10 of 10

Plastic wrap sounds better than foil! People here r used to wrapping fruit cake with foil to serve at weddings. Thanx y'all.

Quote by @%username% on %date%