lizislisa Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 4:12pm
post #1 of

I made a box cake, followed exact directions (mix, 1 c water, 1/2 c oil, 3 eggs). I put PAM in the bottom of my glassware and baked it to perfection. The cake sat out over night on the stove. In the morning, I couldn't get it out of the pan. I turned it over and nothing. The sides were not stuck to it. . I used a spatula to try to gently lift the cake and then I turned the pan again. The damn thing fell apart and crumbled! Why?! Thank you.

10 replies
MsGF Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 4:21pm
post #2 of

I always use parchment paper on the bottom of my pans. I find that is the easiest no fail way to get cake out of a pan every time. I don't know why it happens, but I know it sometimes happens even with well greased and floured pans. Use parchment it saves a lot of headache. Other posters use a homemade shortening and flour mix to grease pans maybe someone will chime in about that.

Good Luck and happy baking.

DeeDelightful Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 4:25pm
post #3 of

Use the PAM for baking. It has flour in it. Regular baking spray is not always the best. You could pop the cake back in the oven for a few minutes to release the bottom. Sometimes that works.

jgifford Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 4:31pm
post #4 of

This is what works for me. NEVER use Pam. Don't let your cake sit in the pan overnight. Grease and flour your pans the old-fashioned way. When you take the pan out of the overn, immediately set it on a wet towel. You'll be able to turn it out of the pan almost instantly. I can take a cake out of the oven, level it and turn it out of the pan in less than 2 minutes. I found this tip online about 5 years ago. I don't know why it works, but I haven't had a cake stick to the pan since.HTH

BlueRose8302 Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 6:21pm
post #5 of

I use the PAM for baking and I never have problems with it. I use a LOT of it, though. Leaving the cake in the pan for that long can make it stick more, though. Good luck!

Dayti Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 7:30pm
post #6 of

Your main problem here was leaving it in the pan overnight. Had you used parchment paper you would have got it out a bit easier, but next time just leave it in the pan for 10 mins or slightly more before turning it out. Use grease and parchment for best results, in my opinion.

BlakesCakes Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 8:45pm
post #7 of

Good info in all of the above posts.

I'll also add that glassware is not really good for baking cakes. Glass cools very differently than metal cake pans, the sides are flared, etc. Best to invest in pans for cake baking.

No matter what you bake in, you really need to get the cake out well before "all night". I have the best results waiting 10-15 mins. I use Wilton pan release put on with a paper towel or pastry brush. I ALWAYS put parchment in the bottom of the pan.

I no longer use any spray on pan preps because I got overly crunchy/crusty top edges on the cake. With the brush on pan release, the edges are the same texture as the rest of the cake.

Rae

littlestruedel Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 8:59pm
post #8 of

I think your main problem was letting it cool in the pan overnight. When the cake completely cools, the agent that you used to keep it from sticking dries and no longer lets the cake release.
If you've let it cool to long, you can gently heat the bottom of the cake pan on the stove top for a minute and then it will release easily.

DeniseNH Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 11:59pm
post #9 of

I always use waxed paper, parchment is too expensive. Never have a problem with waxed paper.

teenaluiz Posted 5 Jul 2012 , 12:09am

when using pan spray the cake must be dumped out of the pan while still warm. If you use the shortening and flour method it is not necessary to remove while warm.

PinkLotus Posted 5 Jul 2012 , 1:02am

I make my own pan release. Equal parts flour, vegetable oil and shortening. The cake pops out like nothing every single time.

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