Soco119 Posted 30 Jun 2012 , 1:28pm
post #1 of

Hi all! I'm hoping you experts can help me out. I've discovered my love for ganache under fondant but am still having trouble making a white chocolate ganache. I have no trouble with the dark chocolate but when it comes to white for some reasone I can't get it to set hard. I've tried different types of white chocolate, but never the chips. Any foolproof tips or tricks? I have tried adding more melted chocolate to see if it hardens any but never with success.
Also, it is completely wrong if I cover a white cake with dark choc ganache for under fondant? I'd love to use the white if I can get it to work!

Thanks in advance,
Amy

7 replies
BakingIrene Posted 2 Jul 2012 , 12:27am
post #2 of

What specific brands of white chocolate did you try?

Because there are two kinds: the fat can be real cocoa butter, or it can be hydrogenated plant oil that by law must be called "coating" or "candy" but NOT "chocolate".

I find that Lindt set up too hard...

Bluehue Posted 2 Jul 2012 , 3:29am
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Soco119

Hi all! I'm hoping you experts can help me out. I've discovered my love for ganache under fondant but am still having trouble making a white chocolate ganache. I have no trouble with the dark chocolate but when it comes to white for some reasone I can't get it to set hard. I've tried different types of white chocolate, but never the chips. Any foolproof tips or tricks? I have tried adding more melted chocolate to see if it hardens any but never with success.

Also, it is completely wrong if I cover a white cake with dark choc ganache for under fondant? No, not at all - my cakes are covered in whatever ganache the customer prefers..... I'd love to use the white if I can get it to work!

Thanks in advance,
Amy


luckyblueeye Posted 2 Jul 2012 , 4:03am
post #4 of

I used white ganache for the first time today and had wonderful results. Here's what I got: Land O' Lakes heavy whipping cream 1: 3 ratio to Guittard White Satin. The White Satin is a coating chocolate and was less than half the price of Guittard regular white chocolate ($14.99 for 5 lbs)...and it came in small enough pieces that I just put the super hot cream over them and stirred after a couple minutes.
It was so great to work with that I doubt I'll use buttercream under fondant ever again.
Your local cake supplier probably carries different types of chocolates and can make recommendations. The cash & carry place I went to offered tastings on every single chocolate I inquired. Good luck icon_smile.gif

mcaulir Posted 2 Jul 2012 , 10:22am
post #5 of

It depends on the weather as well as the brands of chocolate. I have to add quite a bit more cream in winter, as the cold weather sets it up a lot harder.

I usually try to err on the side of too little cream than too much, because you can always zap it in the microwave to make it soft enough to spread.

Addictive_desserts Posted 2 Jul 2012 , 11:29am
post #6 of

A rule of thumb. Dark choc ganache 2:1 and white choc 3:1!

Bluehue Posted 2 Jul 2012 , 11:36am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addictive_desserts

A rule of thumb. Dark choc ganache 2:1 and white choc 3:1!




I hear you - however this can depend on what brand of chocolate you use and as stated above - the weather.
As mcaulir previously said - err on the side of caution when it comes to the cream - as a little can always be added if need be....

Bluehue

Soco119 Posted 4 Jul 2012 , 9:57am
post #8 of

Thanks everyone!

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