mfruchey Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 9:59pm
post #1 of

Please offer any suggestions...

I was aske by my husband's family to bake a three-tiered cake for his great-grandfather's 95th birthday. The party was scheduled for tomorrow, but he passed away today. I had planned a family tree cake with a topper of him and his late wife holding each other and looking down at the tree.

My husband's family would still like the cake for the family to share after the services on Monday. However, since the cake was due tomorrow, i have already baked and filled. It is not yet iced nor covered with fondant. There are no perishable fillings. Should I go ahead and ice and cover with fondant and leave out (covered) on the counter until Monday, or should I freeze the filled cakes ad decorate on Sunday? The cakes are 6", 9", and 12", if that makes any difference.

Thanks so much!

12 replies
icer101 Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 10:07pm
post #2 of

You can freeze the layers now(wrapped really good) or do as BlakesCakes says about freezing already fondant covered cakes.hth

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-732338.html

SRumzis Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 10:08pm
post #3 of

Personally I would ice to help seal the moisture in, then refrigerate until you're ready to add the fondant. That's just my opinion. Hth.

mfruchey Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 10:51pm
post #4 of

I'm not a big fan of refrigerating cakes anyway, but I definitely don't have the room. :/

carmijok Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 11:10pm
post #5 of

I always freeze my cakes. Wrap the layers really well in saran wrap and they will be wonderful. Ice and decorate the day before. I do only b/c cakes so I don't cover with fondant, but if I did I would unwrap and let the cakes thaw before filling and frosting as usual. It doesn't take that long. I usually go ahead and fill and frost the cakes while they're still frozen...well they start out that way, but like I said, they thaw quickly.

mfruchey Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 11:22pm
post #6 of

They're already filled. I filled them before he passed. Can I still ice them? I already have $100 in ingredients in this cakeI can't afford to start over.

DeniseNH Posted 29 Jun 2012 , 11:23pm
post #7 of

In this heat. I vote for freezing.

mfruchey Posted 30 Jun 2012 , 12:03am
post #8 of

I meant can I freeze them already filled, not can I "ice" them. Oops!

Any suggestions on how best to freeze filled cakes? I've never frozen before. When would I defrost in order to decorate on Sunday?

icer101 Posted 30 Jun 2012 , 12:24am
post #9 of

mfruchey, I posted right after your first post. I sent a link that is really good info by blakes cakes. Maybe it didn,t answer your question. I would complete the cakes, then freeze ,etc. as the link tells you. hth

mfruchey Posted 30 Jun 2012 , 1:08am

Thanks so much for the info. I am familiar with that method but am concerned about having the room in my refrigerator for the defrosting.

I know--a lot of problems, lol. And not a lot of time until I need to make a decision.

Apti Posted 30 Jun 2012 , 1:28am

Quote:
Originally Posted by mfruchey

Please offer any suggestions...

I was asked by my husband's family to bake a three-tiered cake for his great-grandfather's 95th birthday. The party was scheduled for tomorrow, but he passed away today. I had planned a family tree cake with a topper of him and his late wife holding each other and looking down at the tree.

My husband's family would still like the cake for the family to share after the services on Monday. However, since the cake was due tomorrow, i have already baked and filled. It is not yet iced nor covered with fondant. There are no perishable fillings. Should I go ahead and ice and cover with fondant and leave out (covered) on the counter until Monday, or should I freeze the filled cakes ad decorate on Sunday? The cakes are 6", 9", and 12", if that makes any difference.

Thanks so much!




Easy solution. Place a card board cake circle under each baked and filled layer. Then wrap each layer on the cardboard, in 2-3 layers of plastic wrap. (The cardboard will help in handling the cake tiers as you move them in and out of the freezer.) When you get up Sunday morning, take them out of the freezer and place them on a counter. Do NOT unwrap. (Any condensation will form on the plastic wrap, not the cake.)

Personally, I like to set a kitchen timer for 30 minutes, at which time they are partially defrosted, before removing the plastic wrap. At the 30 minute mark, when they are partially defrosted, apply the crumb coat. (Other people apply the crumb coat right away while they are still frozen. Still others wait until they are fully defrosted.)

From this point, you will continue to decorate, cover with fondant, etc. just as if the cakes were never frozen. Once fully decorated on Sunday, cover loosely with plastic wrap on a counter, and do NOT refrigerate. It will be just fine on Monday. The cakes will taste as fresh as if you just made them on Monday.

My sympathies to you and your family on the death of your grandpa. The cake sounds like it will still be a lovely celebration of his and your grandmother's lives.

BakingIrene Posted 30 Jun 2012 , 1:34am

I would ice the cakes with a thin layer and then freeze.

I think this cake will be very welcome at the memorial service.

Apti Posted 30 Jun 2012 , 1:51am

mfruchey~Here's another current thread about working with cold cakes:

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopicp-7303018.html#7303018

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