naiyyar Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 4:02pm
post #1 of

Hello CC experts,

What can i use to write messages on a cake?? frosting? ganache? wat else can i use. what is the standard?

Also how can i improve on my cake writing skills, font styles etc etc.

Thanx

19 replies
thebittersweetbakehouse Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 4:13pm
post #2 of

i've done writing a few different ways....just to be a little creative. Ive created hand twisted wire lettering to slot in cake, shaped the fondant into letters, i also made a weird peanut butter/custard powder/syrup gum that i shaped into dinosaur bone lettering, then i use coloured butter creams for piping or white/coloured fondant icing sugar to pipe letters. You could also cut out fondant letters or stencil them on with edible paints icon_smile.gif hope this may have helped

tracey1970 Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 4:24pm
post #3 of

Besides buttercream piping, I have done letters in royal icing (sometimes tracing a pattern of a letter shape I like under waxed paper). I also really like using tappits, patchwork and JEM cutters, clickstix, etc. - all of which are fondant/gumpaste cutters. Some people have the Cricut cake machine and use it to form letters and shapes too.

Wildgirl Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 5:07pm
post #4 of

It took me a while to figure out that it really helps if the icing is thin enough to flow nicely. If it's too thick it just doesn't form nice letters and keeps breaking.

Unlimited Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 6:32pm
post #5 of

It helps to watch others write, if you're a visual learner. I made a video. Click on the link in my signature below.
V V V V V V V V

naiyyar Posted 9 Sep 2012 , 8:28am
post #6 of

Thanks a ton for the replies. it really helps to know that we are not alone on CC. your tips and guidance means a lot. Thanx again.

will practice and practice.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 10 Sep 2012 , 3:34pm
post #7 of

Re: Piping

If the frosting (or other material) is too "long," it will slump, and if it's on the side of anything, it will run. If it's too stiff, you'll have trouble getting it to stick, and even trouble keeping it from breaking.

From my own observations, I'd say that until you get enough experience to know when the consistency is right, it's going to be a matter of dumb luck.

I'm still entirely at the "dumb luck" stage myself.

Unlimited Posted 11 Sep 2012 , 12:15am
post #8 of

If it breaks it's probably because it's too airy. Adding more liquid or piping gel helps to prevent breaks.

kakeladi Posted 11 Sep 2012 , 10:35pm
post #9 of

If you are using b'cream to write with -consistency is very important. You don't want it too thin, but definitely not stiff.
To 'thin' it don't add too much liquid - instead make it creamier by adding more fat. Practice - that's really the key. Find a font you want to try and make a copy to set right in front of you so you can see each stroke as you go.
For practice get that lined paper kindergarteners use to learn writing; write out the letters/words & put plastic over it. Now you can trace over until you feel comfortable doing it w/o tracing it icon_smile.gif
Also, try using piping gel, melted chocolate (thickened with the *tiniest*/ single drop of water - just thick enough that it doesn't run out of the tip - you have to work quickly when using choco!)

Jenise Posted 11 Sep 2012 , 11:50pm

Another tip that I learned a while back is to use a toothpick to "write" on your cake, when that is to your satisfaction, you can then go over it with the frosting/chocolate/piping gel of your choice.

Unlimited Posted 12 Sep 2012 , 5:21am

I like it soupy and running out of the tip especially if writing fast on cakes all day. It can't be too thin for me! Sometimes we'd use piping gel tinted with lots of liquid coloring to make it soupy. It needs to flow and fall onto the cake as you pipe above rather than "drawing" the writing directly on the cake's surface.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 12 Sep 2012 , 7:40am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

I like it soupy and running out of the tip especially if writing fast on cakes all day. It can't be too thin for me! Sometimes we'd use piping gel tinted with lots of liquid coloring to make it soupy.




And it doesn't slump like crazy on horizontal surfaces, and run like crazy on vertical ones?

Mikel79 Posted 12 Sep 2012 , 10:41am

I don't write on any of my cakes. I use tappits for writing messages and make templates for large names.

Here is an example:

http://cakecentral.com/gallery/2400550/happy-birthday

Unlimited Posted 12 Sep 2012 , 3:35pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

I like it soupy and running out of the tip especially if writing fast on cakes all day. It can't be too thin for me! Sometimes we'd use piping gel tinted with lots of liquid coloring to make it soupy.



And it doesn't slump like crazy on horizontal surfaces, and run like crazy on vertical ones?




No, if slump means spread. And, I wouldn't attempt to write on the cake's side with soup which is why I included this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

It needs to flow and fall onto the cake as you pipe above rather than "drawing" the writing directly on the cake's surface.




Of course, it would need to be thicker to make it possible to pipe on the sides.

WickedGoodies Posted 13 Sep 2012 , 4:18am

I prefer to use chocolate.

 

lkern777 Posted 14 Sep 2012 , 2:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedGoodies

I prefer to use chocolate and you may find this cake writing tutorial helpful:
http://www.wickedgoodies.net/2012/08/cake-writing-tips/




Awesome tutorial! Writing is my weakest point. Thanks for sharing.

SugarJewels Posted 28 Jun 2013 , 2:26pm

!

SugarJewels Posted 28 Jun 2013 , 2:27pm

This is awesome!!!  Thank you, Thank you Thank you.  What a great way to write on cakes, and such simple recipes too!!!  

auntginn Posted 28 Jun 2013 , 3:05pm

I used to teach my students to keep their arm straight and move their whole arm as opposed to writing while moving only the wrist.  

cakealicious7 Posted 28 Jun 2013 , 3:13pm

AThat is good advice auntginn, I'm learning to practice by writing on baking paper,I'm also trying freehand designs- I'm a henna artist so I love all that stuff!! : ))

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