Cake Decorating At A Professional Bakery

Business By Inacake Updated 26 Jun 2012 , 1:51pm by BakingIrene

Inacake Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 4:57am
post #1 of 9

There's a local bakery here that is hiring cake decorators (both part and full time). Does anyone here know off-hand what a cake decorator gets paid at a bakery? I know that it probably varies depending on business, city, etc.

8 replies
Adam101 Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 5:10am
post #2 of 9

Anywhere from $10-$15 dollars per hour. I wouldn't take less than 11 depending on your portfolio. If you are below the 11 dollar range make sure you are hourly. Do not take a salary position at that pay unless you want the experience. Remember to never take their first offer. ALWAYS try to up your price. If they are a stand-up employer, the worst that could happen is that they say no to your price and you take the job.

jason_kraft Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 5:18am
post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam101

Remember to never take their first offer. ALWAYS try to up your price. If they are a stand-up employer, the worst that could happen is that they say no to your price and you take the job.



Depends on how many qualified local applicants there are, they may simply move on to their second choice. If the first offer is fair, accept it.

You can find out if it's fair by looking at a salary survey like payscale.com.

Adam101 Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 5:23am
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam101

Remember to never take their first offer. ALWAYS try to up your price. If they are a stand-up employer, the worst that could happen is that they say no to your price and you take the job.


Depends on how many qualified local applicants there are, they may simply move on to their second choice. If the first offer is fair, accept it.

You can find out if it's fair by looking at a salary survey like payscale.com.




You could take the first offer but why? If they are offering you the job and how much they will pay, they obviously want you. It's not as if they would rescind the job offer just because you ask for $0.50 more. If they suddenly change their mind on you for that then they are not worth working for.

You would only up your price if you were actually offered the job.

jason_kraft Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 6:02am
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adam101

You could take the first offer but why? If they are offering you the job and how much they will pay, they obviously want you.



All that means is that you are their first choice. If you only slightly edged out the second choice, demanding more money immediately (even only $0.50/hour) may be enough for them to move on to the next candidate.

Now if you are the only qualified candidate you do have some leverage, but it's difficult to know for sure if that is the case. Chances are better that there are others close behind you.

A safer way to go is to accept the first offer (again assuming it is fair) and petition for a raise a few months down the line once you have proven yourself and the company has invested time and money in training you.

Unlimited Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 6:20am
post #6 of 9

If they're a union shop, there will be no negotiating -- you'll work for the contract rate.

Union wages are significantly higher. For example, the $10 - $11 per hour range was typical for 1985 wages.

Good luck!

Adam101 Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 6:42am
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited

If they're a union shop, there will be no negotiating -- you'll work for the contract rate.

Union wages are significantly higher. For example, the $10 - $11 per hour range was typical for 1985 wages.

Good luck!




Working for a union shop or company in the food service industry is amazing. I knew a dishwasher who earned $18 an hour!!!

Inacake Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 12:57pm
post #8 of 9

Thanks everyone for your feedback! I don't know which business in town it is yet. My city on FB posted about the job. They don't want to disclose which business b/c they don't want people showing up to apply when it's very busy.

BakingIrene Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 1:51pm
post #9 of 9

You can ASK the bakery how they do raises--based on performance, based on experience, profit sharing, how?

They way that they answer will tell you if you should worry about what they pay. Most sensible employers have a pay scale in mind when they advertise. Most sensible employers mention this scale at the interview.

You should know your local minimum wage and the hours above which you get overtime. Your skill will determine how far above minimum you start.

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