Pearl645 Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 6:54pm
post #1 of

What does the height of each tier look like for this wedding cake? I got this from a wedding planner for a bride's wedding cake. I know industry standard height is 4" but this seems like more. Is it advisable to do a wedding cake like this with each tier higher than 4"? Any challenges to expect with tall cake tiers? It will be a 4 tier wedding cake. Top chocolate cake. 2nd & 3rd dummy cakes and bottom tier chocolate cake.
LL

11 replies
Dayti Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 6:58pm
post #2 of

I think they are 4". The top could be a 4" round since it's as wide as it is tall. Then 6", 8" 10" and 12"....tall tiers are a pain, I just did a 3 tier cake with 6" high tiers...had to dowel and board halfway through each cake so it would support because I couldn't use SPS.

LilBlackSheep Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 7:43pm
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti

I think they are 4". The top could be a 4" round since it's as wide as it is tall. Then 6", 8" 10" and 12"....tall tiers are a pain, I just did a 3 tier cake with 6" high tiers...had to dowel and board halfway through each cake so it would support because I couldn't use SPS.




SPS has 9" columns that can be cut down.

kakeladi Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 10:52pm
post #4 of

As each tier gets smaller in diamater, they will *look* taller. I say in your example they are all 4" tall. The two upper tiers look taller because they are not as big around.

People are doing many different things w/wedding cakes. There is no reason you cannot make a tier 6" (or more) tall -except it does not fit well on the average serving plate for desserts.

Dayti Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 11:20pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilBlackSheep

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti

I think they are 4". The top could be a 4" round since it's as wide as it is tall. Then 6", 8" 10" and 12"....tall tiers are a pain, I just did a 3 tier cake with 6" high tiers...had to dowel and board halfway through each cake so it would support because I couldn't use SPS.



SPS has 9" columns that can be cut down.



Yes, but I couldn't use them on this cake because of the shape of the tiers. And I keep reading about not stacking more than 4" of cake without support...

FromScratchSF Posted 23 Jun 2012 , 3:32am
post #6 of

Personally, I do not think those are 4" - I think those are at least 4.5" tiers, possibly 5". All my cakes are at least 4.5" now and every time I see 4" tall tiers I think the cakes look squatty and weird. No offence (if you do 4" tiers), it's just what I'm used to now.

That cake looks perfect height to me icon_biggrin.gif

Pearl645 Posted 23 Jun 2012 , 6:01pm
post #7 of

Thanks for all the responses. I actually like the look of 5" high tiers. All my wedding cakes have been 4" and I know what you mean about that squatty look. Perhaps I will try for 5" tiers and see. Of course the real challenge is getting cake slices to fit into wedding cake boxes which are so tiny. Almost only 3 - 4" H is all we have available here. Last 4"H wedding cake tier i did could barely fit into the take-home containers for guests. We have size limitations here it seems.

caketherapy Posted 28 Oct 2013 , 10:19pm
post #8 of

i am having the same issue with this cake and do i get 2" pans or three. at the moment I am leaning towards 2" and thinking of using thick boards under each layer (covered with fondant) to look like taller cake yet fit on a little plate when cut. Any better ideas welcomed

bakingk8 Posted 9 Apr 2014 , 12:23pm
post #9 of

The cake always looks taller once it's covered in fondant, I've started using a website called http://www.bakingit.com, using their "cake tier combinations" calculator. I can sit with a customer and we can work out the height of their cake layers against the number of servings. From this they can visualize the cake and see what they prefer the look of. There is no standard height anymore I don't think. It's all down to personal preference. If you're not sure put your requirements into the "cake sketcher" calculator and play around with it to see what different heights will look like. I find this useful :-) hope it helps. 

csawtannery Posted 15 Aug 2014 , 1:13am

AWhat size cake pans do you use 2" or 3" to get the height of 4"? I bake in 2" pans and can never seem to get 4" height. Thought about switching to 3" pans.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 15 Aug 2014 , 4:16am

Quote:

Originally Posted by csawtannery 

What size cake pans do you use 2" or 3" to get the height of 4"? I bake in 2" pans and can never seem to get 4" height. Thought about switching to 3" pans.


Try using a parchment collar around your pan, and make sure no grease touches the sides. The cake will climb up and stick to it as it bakes. It won't give you another inch or two, but it will give them a nice boost.

 

I just put in a little more batter than I technically need to for a layer, and it bakes up to the top for me, but that has to do more with recipe/baking method than the cake pan size.

I have one chocolate cake recipe that I have to collar, otherwise it refuses to bake up properly.

 

I am assuming you are baking two 2" layers, not trying to get 4" out of one, right?

 

This is just the first google result I got, I didn't look too closely through it, but it does show you how to collar a pan. http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=154355

morganchampagne Posted 15 Aug 2014 , 5:49am

AMy tiers are all 5" tall and i use the 9" pillars and cut them [@]Dayti[/@] I know you said you couldn't do it that way this time but I've never had any problems with buckling slipping etc etc :)

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