HannahsMomi Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 1:18am
post #1 of

I need advice. I'm making a 3 tier wedding cake (6, 9, 12") at the end of July. Lemon cake with raspberry buttercream filling, all covered in buttercream and covered with bunches of hydrangea sugar flowers. I will be driving the cake for about 1 hour and 15 minutes in the heat of the summer in Georgia. The cake will be stacked using the SPS system. My question is, can I drive this distance with this cake fully assembled? Or should I wait to assemble it on site? I would much prefer assembling it before the drive. I love SPS and trust it completely on shorter drives, but I want some advice considering the distance and the heat. What do you all think?

15 replies
carmijok Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 2:04am
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I would think stacking a buttercream cake at the site would be a bit tricky and possibly messy even if it is crusted. I'd go for stacking it before. SPS is the smart thing to do. Just get it good and cold before you leave and keep your air conditioner blasting. As long as it's flat on some no-skid shelf liner...preferably in a tall box (open at the top and split at the sides so you can slide it in and out easier), you should be good to go.

HannahsMomi Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 2:25pm
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carmijok...thanks for the response! I am feeling much better about transporting it now! You are building my confindence!!
I would like some more input as well though! Any suggestions??? Please?

AnnieCahill Posted 22 Jun 2012 , 3:55pm
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Make sure the cake is ice cold before you put it in the car. And also make sure your vehicle is VERY well air conditioned. I would seriously let it run for a good 15 minutes to a half hour to make sure it's cold. That is the only way I would do it. Georgia heat is absolutely oppressive.

costumeczar Posted 23 Jun 2012 , 2:22pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill

Make sure the cake is ice cold before you put it in the car. And also make sure your vehicle is VERY well air conditioned. I would seriously let it run for a good 15 minutes to a half hour to make sure it's cold. That is the only way I would do it. Georgia heat is absolutely oppressive.




That's exactly what I was going to say too. If the cake is cold at the start it will be fine, box it up well and keep the AC running full force the entire way. I use moving boxes from Staples that are big enough to put the whole cake in, tape it shut and put it in the cold car, and the cakes are still cold when I get where I'm going.

HannahsMomi Posted 24 Jun 2012 , 12:26am
post #6 of

Thanks, everyone, for all the advice! I have so much anxiety about this cake because of the distance and the heat! I've never driven a cake this far in this much heat! I will do all that each of you has told me to ensure this delivery goes without drama!! Thanks again! I appreciate it so much! I can always come here for any help I need! I love this board!

Chellescakes Posted 24 Jun 2012 , 3:34am
post #7 of

One thing don't forget to put on a jumper before you get in the car so you don't freeze for and hour and a half.

snowshoe1 Posted 24 Jun 2012 , 2:03pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chellescakes

One thing don't forget to put on a jumper before you get in the car so you don't freeze for and hour and a half.



Oh so true!! Been there..... icon_biggrin.gif

HannahsMomi Posted 24 Jun 2012 , 10:41pm
post #9 of

Hee, hee....that's funny! icon_biggrin.gif I'll have to wear my parka and mittens!

Oh, what we do for cakes...

QueenOfSweets Posted 25 Jun 2012 , 3:57pm

This past weekend I did a five-tier cake with two faux separators and had to travel 3 hours away via county highways that were incredibly rough. I transported in three sections, and one of those sections was a 6-8-10 square stacked. All sections were iced in buttercream then covered in fondant. The weather was 92 degrees and humid. I used SPS and made sure that the boxes didn't sit in direct sunlight. We made it without a single dragee falling off. If you follow the suggestions above, I think you'll be fine!

HannahsMomi Posted 25 Jun 2012 , 4:27pm

Thank you, QueenOfSweets! It's good to hear about your cake delivery!! Now I'm feeling confident enough to go through with it! I will be using all of the great suggestions from above!

auntginn Posted 25 Jun 2012 , 5:10pm

I use a makeshift dryice system that has saved me more times than I can think.

Pack dryice in the bottom of a box larger than your cake (packing or moving boxes) place paper or plastic around the dryice so it doesn't shift. Put a board on top of the ice and non skid mat on top of the board. Place your cake on top of all this, close it up and wrap the box in a plastic bag to seal it up.

It will keep like a mini fridge for up to 8 hrs. Like I said I've used it in the heat of summer in a vehicle with no ac and I had to drive 2hrs to deliver the cake.

We made it fine.

cakequeen50 Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 12:59am

we deliver in Georgia, 1hour and 15 minutes OFTEN. follow the advise of getting the cake really cold, I put it in the fridge over night, boxing it will keep the cold in, crank up the air, wear a sweater, you will be fine! I had a 5 tier cake in the air conditioned van last saturday in atlanta for 2 hours, buttercream already stacked and it made it fine, I always say a prayer of thanks!

ginger6361 Posted 26 Jun 2012 , 3:26am

Can someone tell me what SPS is? thanks

Baker_Rose Posted 27 Jun 2012 , 2:50am

Make sure to black out any windows that may allow sun to get to the cake. You can have the a/c blowing Arctic Winter and then the sun comes through the window for just enough time to melt the icing right off the cake.

Go ahead, ask me how I know that..........

You only make that mistake once.

HannahsMomi Posted 27 Jun 2012 , 12:57pm

Thanks, cakequeen50!
Baker_Rose....I don't want to ask! That's my worst nightmare come true!

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