kristanashley Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 4:55pm
post #1 of

I just did it! I had to make a wedding cake for my cousin who lives 14 hours away. I was worried about driving that far this time of year with all the heat, so I decided I would just go ahead and freeze the fondant covered cakes and see what happened. Here's what I did... I baked, filled (raspberry preserves and BC), iced, and covered my cakes (6,8,10, and 12") in fondant. I put them in boxes and wrapped the whole box well in saran wrap and put them in the stand-up freezer the day before I left. We folded the van seat down and put some of that gripping shelf liner stuff down and set the frozen cakes on it without unwrapping the saran wrap. We drove and got there on Friday night and put them in the refrigerator and left the saran wrap on. At this point I had to peek to make sure they were okay. They were still cool to the touch and did sweat a little, but the fondant still looked perfect. The next morning I took them out of the refridgerator and the cakes were a teeny tiny bit sticky, but they air dried in about 30 minutes. The fondant was still perfect. No drooping or sagging or anything. I decorated them that morning for the wedding that evening. The cake was super moist and delicious. Success! Good to know, right?!?

30 replies
mbranko24 Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 4:57pm
post #2 of

What brand/kind of fondant did you use?

kristanashley Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 5:06pm
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbranko24

What brand/kind of fondant did you use?




Wilton's with vanilla extract added.

Claire138 Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 5:09pm
post #4 of

Good to know, this is always one of my worries so I've never been brave enough!

srkmilklady Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 5:15pm
post #5 of

I really want to give this a try. My daughter's wedding is in October and I don't want to be busy the week before baking, so I thought I might try this and do the cakes (bake, torte, fill, crumb coat and fondant) the weekend before and freeze them and then just leave the last minute decorations till the Friday. (wedding is on Sunday) That would allow me to spend time with my daughter through the week. It just sounds so scary, but I know that another CC'er has said she finished a cake, decorations and all and froze the whole thing and it came out great!

So happy it worked out for you. I wonder if it makes a difference based on cake flavors or fillings as to whether it might or might not work?

Elcee Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 6:20pm
post #6 of

Funny frozen cake story...I made a proposal cake about 9 months ago for a friend's son. The cake was a hit and I was told the new bride-to-be wouldn't let it be cut. I didn't do the wedding cake because they used a venue that only allows cakes from their list of approved vendors. We went to the wedding this past weekend. As soon as we arrived, the groom came bounding over to say thanks again for the cake and we "should go see it; it's next to the wedding cake". Apparently, they've had it in the freezer all this time just for this purpose icon_smile.gif. I have no idea how it was stored in there, and because of the whole preferred vendor thing, they didn't cut it, which I'm actually grateful for. Who knows if it was in there uncovered next to a side of beef or something icon_lol.gif. BUT it LOOKED amazing! The only issue was a possible finger dent in one corner of the box.

Mine is the little cake on the left:
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.377050832359951.90561.368152219916479&type=3#!/photo.php?fbid=377055612359473&set=a.377050832359951.90561.368152219916479&type=3&theater

srkmilklady Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 7:24pm
post #7 of

Elcee, the cake is sooo cute! Do you know if they ever ate it?? Not that I'm planning to freeze a cake for 9 months, but it looks amazing after that length of time, so I guess if I wanted to freeze a fondant covered cake for a week or two, it "shouldn't" be an issue?? icon_confused.gif

Annabakescakes Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 7:56pm
post #8 of

Last year I had 3 cake orders for the weekend, and learned it was also my grandparents 60th wedding anniversary, so I made them on wednesday, boxed them and wrapped them and froze them. My mom went to the bakery Saturday and set them on them on counter, still wrapped, and let them thaw. The next day she cam early to cut to plastic wrap from them and they looked perfect! One even had a gumpaste bow that was sitting on top, and it was still poofy!

Prima Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 9:00pm
post #9 of

Would you mind sharing the recipe for raspberry filling you used? I have a recipe that I love, and would love to be able to freeze cake tiers for time management's sake, but my filling does not freeze well. Something happens to the texture of the filling when it thaws. If yours thawed successfully, I'd love to try this!

Thanks!

Elcee Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 9:09pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by srkmilklady

Elcee, the cake is sooo cute! Do you know if they ever ate it?? Not that I'm planning to freeze a cake for 9 months, but it looks amazing after that length of time, so I guess if I wanted to freeze a fondant covered cake for a week or two, it "shouldn't" be an issue?? icon_confused.gif




Thanks icon_smile.gif. I don't think they ate it. They are on their honeymoon now. Had I known they were going to freeze it for that long, I would have packaged it for them in a way that odors wouldn't have penetrated. One caveat, though, is that we're in southern Colorado where there's really low humidity.

I think I'd give it a shot if I were you. You have time to do a test cake, right?

VaBelle Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 9:24pm

Last year I made a large Superbowl cake with the two helmets on top for a friedn's superbowl party. They ended up freezing on of the helmets in a tupperware container and pulled it out a month or so later and said they had no issues with the fondant at all.

sgalvan62 Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 10:23pm

I'm taking my grandson a bday cake 8 hrs away after wrapping boxes with wrap would you put in ice chest ? Driving from New Mexico to Tucson.

srkmilklady Posted 20 Jun 2012 , 12:32am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elcee

Quote:
Originally Posted by srkmilklady

Elcee, the cake is sooo cute! Do you know if they ever ate it?? Not that I'm planning to freeze a cake for 9 months, but it looks amazing after that length of time, so I guess if I wanted to freeze a fondant covered cake for a week or two, it "shouldn't" be an issue?? icon_confused.gif



Thanks icon_smile.gif. I don't think they ate it. They are on their honeymoon now. Had I known they were going to freeze it for that long, I would have packaged it for them in a way that odors wouldn't have penetrated. One caveat, though, is that we're in southern Colorado where there's really low humidity.

I think I'd give it a shot if I were you. You have time to do a test cake, right?



Yes, I have a couple of family birthdays before the wedding, so what better way to test freezing a cake. icon_wink.gif

cakegrandma Posted 20 Jun 2012 , 10:11pm

You can use any fondant on the cake and freeze it with no mishaps. One of the Wilton trainers worked for a company in Canada that made one of Princess Diana's wedding cakes and they froze it. I have done it before but, only 1 time.

Daina-M Posted 19 Oct 2013 , 12:18pm

AI had my cake covered with renshaw fondant and freeze it for next day when I took it out it started sueting a lot and look really glossy in some places colour run on the white so I had to put a fan and try to dry it .Is there any other way to prevent this melting?( I didn't cover it with film)

maybenot Posted 19 Oct 2013 , 10:07pm

Box the completed cake. Wrap box in several layers of saran/plastic wrap and foil.  Freeze. 

24 hrs. before serving, place wrapped box in fridge. 

A few hrs. before serving, place wrapped box on counter. 

Right before display/serving, unbox cake. 

Virtually no sweating.

Daina-M Posted 19 Oct 2013 , 10:22pm

APerhapsm I'll try it next time although I'm afraid

maybenot Posted 19 Oct 2013 , 10:33pm

I've done it many times............here are the most recent examples--both frozen for a week and defrosted by the bride [as described above] the day before the wedding:

 

Navy blue fondant flowers with handmade silver dragees

klick+bride+cake+small.JPG

 

Black chocolate fondant with dry dusted gold plaque

Klick+groom+cake+small.JPG

Daina-M Posted 19 Oct 2013 , 10:36pm

AThey look great! Does it matter the brand of fondant? Do I have to put them in a box sometimes they don't fit in a box when they are big cakes

anavillatoro1 Posted 19 Oct 2013 , 11:17pm

AGood to now!! Thank you ;-D! Maybenot did you freeze the cake whit flower's and dragees?

maybenot Posted 20 Oct 2013 , 4:21am

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daina-M 

They look great! Does it matter the brand of fondant? Do I have to put them in a box sometimes they don't fit in a box when they are big cakes


Yes, they must be boxed and wrapped per ALL of the instructions I provided above.

maybenot Posted 20 Oct 2013 , 4:22am

Quote:

Originally Posted by anavillatoro1 

Good to now!! Thank you thumbs_up.gif! Maybenot did you freeze the cake whit flower's and dragees?


Yes, the cake was completely decorated and the photo was taken after it was defrosted.

anavillatoro1 Posted 20 Oct 2013 , 12:18pm

AThanks ;-D

Danilou Posted 30 Oct 2013 , 7:38am

Would adding a little tylose powder to the fondant help with any stickiness that may occur after thawing? If so how much should I add to say 500g of fondant? Would it be okay to freeze the tiers seperately and assemble them after they have been sitting out for quite a few hours?

maybenot Posted 30 Oct 2013 , 8:25pm

I don't see where adding Tylose will help at all.  It's the process that I described that keeps condensation from forming on the surface.

 

Yes, you could stack them after defrosting, BUT you'd want to wait several hours after the cakes have come to room temp to be certain that they're not even slightly tacky.

BCWishes Posted 28 Dec 2013 , 6:50pm

AOk...need some advice! Early in December, I made a red velvet/cream cheese frosting wedding cake. I covered it in LMF and decorated the whole thing. Then an ice storm hit our area and the wedding was cancelled. The bride/mother of the bride have not filled me in on when the wedding will be rescheduled for. My husband says I should thaw it out and sell it at a drastically reduced price and then remake the cake for the wedding whenever it is. What do you think? How long can it stay in the freezer before I have to remake it? It is in a deep freezer that has nothing else in it.

-K8memphis Posted 28 Dec 2013 , 8:13pm

idk--i always told peeps that the wedding taking place was not a requirement for the cake to happen--this would be one of the reasons why i set things up like that--i told them that storage is also up to them--

 

if i was you i'd probably re-make the cake and then hate myself because there's probably nothing wrong with the frozen one--

 

hey--probably just bring it to temp gradually and if it needs sprucing up just re-cover it? maybe

maybenot Posted 29 Dec 2013 , 8:02pm

If the box is really well wrapped and the freezer operates consistently, the cake will be fine for many months--at least 6. 

 

Now, if the client knows that it's been frozen, I'd let her choose what to do with the cake.  I'd get hold of her on Jan. 2 and I'd tell her that she has 3 choices--one to be made IMMEDIATELY---pay for the cake & take it NOW [to do with as she pleases]; pay for the cake and, if the wedding is held in the next 3 months, use the cake [as is, with no option for complaints or refunds]; pay for the cake and allow me to dispose of it as I see fit. 

 

If the wedding is definitely more than 3 months out from the original date, I'd tell her that she has to pay for this cake NOW and that a new one will cost her the same amount in the future.

 

Of course, you could also have her pay for the cake and take it to her own freezer and let her decide at her leisure.

nikkigladney Posted 27 Feb 2014 , 8:57pm

I do this ALL the time...(bake, torte, fill, and ice the cake) in advance.  Just make sure to wrap them with suran wrap...Make sure you let them sit in the freezer about 15 b4 you wrap them so they will be firm and the butter cream wont move.  This will save so much time...I have sold many cakes that I have frozen at least a week b4 they were fully decorated.  However, once the cake come to room temp the fondant will become sticky.  good luck.  Also, you can just test it out with like a 6inch cake prior to her wedding for taste and any other concerns.

ellavanilla Posted 27 Feb 2014 , 9:19pm

I'm glad someone rebooted this thread because I am shipping a cake at the end of April. I was planning to have some foam supports around the cake to keep it from slipping. Now I'm worried that the condensation as it defrosts will cause problems. 

 

any advice?

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