Wedding Cake To Feed 200. First Wedding Cake.

Decorating By Bex1p Updated 19 Jun 2012 , 10:03pm by Bex1p

Bex1p Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 2:53pm
post #1 of 12

Hi, I was wondering if anyone can help me! I have just had my first wedding cake request from a friend of the family. She asked for a 2 tier to feed 200. Instantly I said she would probably need a 3 tier or a 2 tier and extra cupcakes or a sheet cake. She wants one of the tiers fruit cake and I believe that will make a difference to servings. I've looked at lots of charts but my problem is, not knowing which sizes will look right together! I am trying to price up the 3 tier for her and the 2 tier with extra cake. She would like round cakes. Any help or pointers in the right direction would be greatly appreciated!

Thank you for reading.

11 replies
BakingIrene Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 3:55pm
post #4 of 12

Fruitcake is traditionally cut into 1'"x 1" fingers the height of the cake. It's traditionally baked in a single layer no more than 3" deep for each tier--it gains height when the two layers (marzipan and icing) are applied.

If you bake an 8" square fruitcake then you have 64 pieces. Quote her a proper price for this number of servings of fruitcake which is expensive to bake. This could be your "kitchen cake" covered only with good marzipan.

For round cakes, you need 10" and 16" for 138 servings which will look nice. Or do 8" and 14" rounds (102 pieces). Each 11 x 15 sheetcake does 40 pieces and this size is MUCH easier to handle than12x18.

Or else: 8" round fruitcake (48 pieces), 14" round (78 pieces), 2 sheetcakes (80 pieces)

I am suggesting to make more than 200 total servings because some people will take both kinds. Fact of life.

Bex1p Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 3:56pm
post #5 of 12

Thanks for the links. Have googled a few pics and have decided on a 16 12 and 8 round 3 tier with either 20 cupcakes or a 7x11 sheet.

For the 16" pan recipe would I be right in just doubling what I would use for an 8"?

Thanks!

Bex1p Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 5:40pm
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene

Fruitcake is traditionally cut into 1'"x 1" fingers the height of the cake. It's traditionally baked in a single layer no more than 3" deep for each tier--it gains height when the two layers (marzipan and icing) are applied.

If you bake an 8" square fruitcake then you have 64 pieces. Quote her a proper price for this number of servings of fruitcake which is expensive to bake. This could be your "kitchen cake" covered only with good marzipan.

For round cakes, you need 10" and 16" for 138 servings which will look nice. Or do 8" and 14" rounds (102 pieces). Each 11 x 15 sheetcake does 40 pieces and this size is MUCH easier to handle than12x18.

Or else: 8" round fruitcake (48 pieces), 14" round (78 pieces), 2 sheetcakes (80 pieces)

I am suggesting to make more than 200 total servings because some people will take both kinds. Fact of life.




Thank you so much for the info. Very helpful and greatly appreciated!

carmijok Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 6:29pm
post #7 of 12

I just saw your gallery and while you obviously have talent, I don't see stacked cakes. This is going to be a HUGE cake...and extremely heavy. Plan your structure now and decide if you're going to stack on site...if so, I hope your design is simple enough to do so. There's a LOT involved in making a cake this size and trust me...it WILL take longer than you are planning so do as much as you can as far ahead as you can. I always shoot for having a finished cake the day before it's due so I can allow for last minute situations that always happen...and I don't do wedding cakes!

View a lot of YouTube tutorials on stacking and structure. Does the bride know you haven't done a cake of this size before? I think it's always fun to take on new challenges, but make very sure this is something you can do well...it is her wedding after all. I really don't want to sound negative...I just want you to be successful and prepared! Good luck!

CWR41 Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 8:13pm
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bex1p

For the 16" pan recipe would I be right in just doubling what I would use for an 8"?




No. Doubling the pan size doesn't equal double the volume. It's the difference between 3.5 cups of batter and 15 cups. Refer to the chart:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

BakingIrene Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 8:32pm
post #9 of 12

I encourage you to make the leap and make this cake. I started with layer cakes and then went to the three tier wedding cake using the pre-1990 Wilton yearbooks.

But you will have to pay careful attention to supporting the tiers especially with fruitcake on top. Use the online resources. Look up a Dede Wilson book if your local public library has a copy--either one will do.

Bex1p Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 9:07pm
post #10 of 12

Thank you everyone icon_smile.gif

I have never stacked a cake but I have done nothing but research, read and watch! I am very, very nervous but I think I will manage it.

My plan was to bake the madeira sponges well in advance and freeze and the fruit cake 2-3 days in advance and I would give myself the whole day before the due date to buttercream and cover and stack at the venue depending on what design she is wanting. I will be going to see her this week as she is not sure wether to go for the 3 tier or the 2 tier with sheet cakes.

BakingIrene Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 9:52pm
post #11 of 12

Bake the fruitcake right now as soon as you receive the deposit. YES you are to ask for 50% down and write a receipt so that all agreed terms are on paper.

Soak baked fruitcake with alcohol of choice after baking and wrap airtight and set it in a cold basement. Soak the surface a second time two weeks after. It will mellow out into a superb cake that will be much easier to slice.

Bake your madeira cake no more than a week ahead.

Bex1p Posted 19 Jun 2012 , 10:03pm
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene

Bake the fruitcake right now as soon as you receive the deposit. YES you are to ask for 50% down and write a receipt so that all agreed terms are on paper.

Soak baked fruitcake with alcohol of choice after baking and wrap airtight and set it in a cold basement. Soak the surface a second time two weeks after. It will mellow out into a superb cake that will be much easier to slice.

Bake your madeira cake no more than a week ahead.




Thank you. You've been very helpful and encouraging icon_smile.gif

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