Is 12X18 Sheet Pan, Considered 1/2 Sheet Or Full Sheet Pan

Decorating By jrod1974 Updated 15 Jun 2012 , 10:28pm by CWR41

jrod1974 Posted 14 Jun 2012 , 8:13pm
post #1 of 11

and how many slices would I get if I used this sz pan? thanks so much!

10 replies
kakeladi Posted 14 Jun 2012 , 8:31pm
post #2 of 11

Yes, that would be considered a 1/2 sheet. There are people who think a 9x13 OR 12x16 are a 1/2 sheet alsoicon_sad.gif
If the cake you make w/the 12x18 is 2" deep/tall then to figure servings you would figure 6 times 9 = 54.
If the cake is 4" tall then you use the wedding cake size of 1x2x4 and get 108 servings.

Kitty666 Posted 14 Jun 2012 , 8:36pm
post #3 of 11

A 12 X18 sheet pan is the standard half sheet for professional bakeries and cut into 2 x 2 inches serves 54 people. icon_biggrin.gif

jrod1974 Posted 14 Jun 2012 , 8:44pm
post #4 of 11

thank you so much, doing some research and noticed that the full sheet pans do not fit into the standard sized oven, so I will have to go with this 12x18 pan, icon_smile.gif

jrod1974 Posted 14 Jun 2012 , 8:48pm
post #5 of 11

that's great info, was wondering what the bakeries use icon_smile.gif

Baker_Rose Posted 14 Jun 2012 , 10:08pm
post #6 of 11

Professional bakeries literally use a sheet pan for a full sheet cake. Hence the terms full sheet, half sheet etc.

You buy a fiberglass sheet pan extender that sits on top of the sheet pan and then makes a cake about 2 1/2 to 3 inches thick. If you need a half sheet you cut that cake in half, quarters, etc.

For home baking the closest to "accurate" sizes would be 8x12 for a quarter sheet 12x16 for a half sheet and two half sheets sitting side by side and iced as one cake for a full sheet cake. These are the sizes that the cake boxes are designed to accommodate. That's why a 9x13 cake is just a little too big for the quarter sheet cake boxes, yet the 11x15 is just on the small size for the half sheet cake box.

I would LOVE to know why Wilton went with 7x11 and 11x15 for cake pan sizes. icon_confused.gif

CWR41 Posted 14 Jun 2012 , 11:50pm
post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrod1974

that's great info, was wondering what the bakeries use icon_smile.gif




Here's more information on sizes and commercial full sheets:

1/4 Sheet = 9x13
1/3 Sheet = 11x15
1/2 Sheet = 12x18
Full Sheet = 16x24 (baked in 18x26 Bun pan with bakeable cardboard tray).

Additional full sheet info:
A commercial Bun pan is 18" x 26" (outside measurement), and because they are tapered for nesting or making them stackable, the inside measurement is 16.5" x 24.5".

A commercial full sheet is 16" x 24". They are baked in 16" x 24" bakeable cardboard trays that fit into the Bun pans (flat surface portion) which are used during baking for support and handling purposes.

A true commercial full sheet (16" x 24") serves 96 (unit wt. 106-124 oz.).

BlakesCakes Posted 15 Jun 2012 , 8:22pm
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrod1974

that's great info, was wondering what the bakeries use icon_smile.gif



Here's more information on sizes and commercial full sheets:

1/4 Sheet = 9x13
1/3 Sheet = 11x15
1/2 Sheet = 12x18
Full Sheet = 16x24 (baked in 18x26 Bun pan with bakeable cardboard tray).

Additional full sheet info:
A commercial Bun pan is 18" x 26" (outside measurement), and because they are tapered for nesting or making them stackable, the inside measurement is 16.5" x 24.5".

A commercial full sheet is 16" x 24". They are baked in 16" x 24" bakeable cardboard trays that fit into the Bun pans (flat surface portion) which are used during baking for support and handling purposes.

A true commercial full sheet (16" x 24") serves 96 (unit wt. 106-124 oz.).




Thanks to both posters for clearing this up. I now see that the sizes of the cakes are not the relationships that I always thought they should be (i.e. if a full sheet is a 16x24, wouldn't you expect a 1/2 sheet to be 12x8??)--but are not.

This will really help me to explain the difference to the layman.
Rae

BakingIrene Posted 15 Jun 2012 , 8:46pm
post #9 of 11

If a full sheet is 16 x 24 then 12 x 8 is a quarter.

I find that the 11 x 15 uses two (18 ounce) cake mixes. I think that's why Wilton marketed that size. It bakes in a reasonable length of time and is easy to handle.

The extra length of a 12 x 18 was probably another consideration--it would not fit into some home ovens.

kakeladi Posted 15 Jun 2012 , 9:15pm
post #10 of 11

........ information on sizes and commercial full sheets:
1/4 Sheet = 9x13 ......

No. A 1/4 sheet is 8"x12"x2.
If a 1/4 sheet is 9x13 why do they not make a board and box to fit it?? The board and box is made for a 12x8.

CWR41 Posted 15 Jun 2012 , 10:28pm
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi

........ information on sizes and commercial full sheets:
1/4 Sheet = 9x13 ......

No. A 1/4 sheet is 8"x12"x2.
If a 1/4 sheet is 9x13 why do they not make a board and box to fit it?? The board and box is made for a 12x8.




It will be 8x12, IF you cut it from a true commercial full sheet. The most commonly manufactured 1/4 sheet pan size is 9x13. Everyone and their grandma used this size. It was typically the only size cake pan that anyone owned. (Does anyone own an 8x12?)

These aren't made up sizes, they are real industry standards:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

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