Apology To The Unknown Baker I Offended On Saturday

Lounge By mommachris Updated 13 Jun 2012 , 10:18pm by mommachris

mommachris Posted 12 Jun 2012 , 9:43pm
post #1 of 6

At a Grace and Andrew's wedding here in California, I allowed my head to get too big, and offended another fellow baker.
I was not asked to make the cake at the wedding. I was asked by the wedding coordinator to cut the cake when someone else mentioned I had experience.
The reason I was there was as a favor to the bride's mother. She needed help and asked some friends to come and prep the food and serve it that day. I was so humbled that she would ask.
Some where along the day I forgot that I was there to serve and not to run the show.
I disrespected your method of cutting the tiers ( I was taught to disassemble the layers first) and in doing so I more than likely hurt your feelings.
I hope my apology that night was enough to earn your forgiveness. There is more than one way to cut a cake. icon_redface.gif
Thank you for allowing me to help you serve the guests your wonderful lemon dessert.
Again, I am so sorry I implied that you didn't know what you were doing. It was a lovely cake and the guest enjoyed it very much.
Since you said you have been doing cakes for five years I hoped that you are part of the community here and found this post.
I wish you happy baking.


5 replies
sillywabbitz Posted 12 Jun 2012 , 11:26pm
post #2 of 6

It was very nice of you to apologize in a public forum. This is not a criticism, but I am curious to know how they suggested to cut the cake? I have only ever seen instructions that are based on removing the tiers. The best advice I've seen here also said to always cut the bottom tier and then up so that any left over cake is smaller and easier to take home.
I'm sure they were annoyed at you at the time but that's a pretty minor incident in the world of things and since you apologized I'm sure they're over it.

BlakesCakes Posted 13 Jun 2012 , 1:02am
post #3 of 6

It's very thoughtful of you to apologize here.

In all honesty, I would have refused to cut the cake unless it was unstacked.

Yes, refused--because if an error is made while the cake remains stacked, it can result in a total disaster, something that I wouldn't want to be responsible for having occurred.

I was taught, and I always tell clients, to unstack the cake, remove the supports, and to cut the cake on a flat surface. Seeing the entire tier on a flat surface gives them better reference points for following the Wilton cutting guides.

It works for me, it works for them. There may be other ways to do it that work fine for other people, but I choose not to change something in which I'm so secure.

In other things in life, when I've been told to do something that makes me uncomfortable, I have no problem saying, "No. Thanks anyway. You do it yourself or find someone else to do it who ISN'T uncomfortable."
I've learned to trust my gut and just because nothing bad happened, it still doesn't mean I was wrong.


Lynne3 Posted 13 Jun 2012 , 2:06am
post #4 of 6

I think you are very gracious to consider the baker's feelings. But I am confused about why you are apologizing at all. I am also confused why anyone would have their nose out of joint about how you cut the cake.

It's simple. If the baker was a guest at the wedding, she was available to cut the cake that she made.

If she was there and directing you as to how to cut it, she shouldn't have directed you because the responsibility to cut the cake was falling on you.

BlakesCakes said it best . . ."There may be other ways to do it that work fine for other people, but I choose not to change something in which I'm so secure." . ."when I've been told to do something that makes me uncomfortable, I have no problem saying, "No".

You were a really nice person to go and help your friend. You should be allowed to feel special for that. You are special for that! It may be true that there are different ways to cut a cake. And others could have thought their way was better. Those people could have offered ahead of time to step in and have that responsibility.

But it appears that you were made to feel bad, and still have the responsibility upon you. That's not kind of the people who made you feel that way.

AZCouture Posted 13 Jun 2012 , 2:40am
post #5 of 6

Meh...I cut still stacked if it's short enough. To each his own.

mommachris Posted 13 Jun 2012 , 10:18pm
post #6 of 6

I fully intended to cut the cake after the baker walked away. So full of my abilities was I.
Then I ran into trouble with separating the layers. Instead of a normal single layer of cardboard there was a foil covered cake drum between the bottom and second layer. Not knowing that I attempted to lift the cake ABOVE the drum. It won't budge. The flimsy server and knife I had ( not my own equipment...I usually have a rimless cookie sheet to help me separate layers) was bending from the stress.
That is when I realized the this baker does things unconventionally and to attempt to go any farther would result in a disaster. In short...I don't know what all she had in there for supports, and it make me realize I needed to find her quick. A crowd of hungry guests was gathering with forks in hand. icon_redface.gif

I did end up cutting the bride's cake the way that the baker suggested. There was no way I could remove the tier ( too heavy). Nothing went wrong, people got dessert.

I wanted to back away from the whole thing and let her do it, but she asked me to help since there were actually two cakes to cut and she had no helper.

My daughter and I were guests at a wedding two weeks earlier. I'd made the cake for that bride but didn't serve it. I did swoop in and remove all the live flowers and their straws to make the job easier. Didn't serve the cake because the professional workers, I assumed, could serve it faster than I could. They did a fine job. I watched. icon_smile.gif


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