Sophdobe Posted 10 Jun 2012 , 7:50pm
post #1 of

Hi everyone,

I just had a major cake disaster - my crusting cream cheese buttercream kept sliding off the cake and end up at the bottom!

I used Edencakes crusting cream cheese frosting in the recipe section
http://cakecentral.com/recipe/crusting-cream-cheese-icing

but instead of using the whole 3 1/2 pounds of confectioner¡¦s sugar, I substituted 1/2 cup of confectioner¡¦s sugar with corn flour because the buttercream seemed so runny & soft.

It was around 97 degrees F and very humid in where I live, so the buttercream was very runny & was hardly able to hold up its shape but it did crust if the layer was thin enough (did not crust on the cake).

Can anyone tell me why the buttercream kept sliding off the cake? and if there is anyway to frost a cake with cream cheese buttercream in hot weather without this kind of disaster happening? Or cream cheese just cannot hold up in hot weathers?

Any tips will help icon_smile.gif

Thanks!

15 replies
carmijok Posted 10 Jun 2012 , 8:23pm
post #2 of

I've never had a problem with sliding buttercream...and mine is a crusting buttercream with real butter and cream cheese...no shortening. I had a problem in 108 degree heat once...but it wasn't because it slid off.

My advice is to put your cake in the refrigerator after you crumb coat it...let it harden and then frost your cake, decorate and put it back in the refrigerator and keep it there until delivery.

I also would never use anything but powdered sugar--pure cane. HTH!

Sophdobe Posted 10 Jun 2012 , 9:54pm
post #3 of

Hi~~ I did a crumb coat and left the cake in the fridge to let it settle over night - I also kept putting it back in the fridge after frosting it but as soon as it take it out, the sliding nightmare begins.... eeek!

The reason I used shortening is because I read somewhere that shortening help the buttercream to crust and corn starch will stiffen the buttercream - may be i'll try all butter recipe next time...

Would it be the cream cheese that makes the whole buttercream so liquid? Cuz I find everytime I make cream cheese frosting, they tend to melt away like lava...

denetteb Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 2:06am
post #4 of

If it is too soft and runny when you are making it, putting the cake in the frig and putting it back in the frig while icing is only delaying the problem, not eliminating it. As soon as it comes back to room temp it will go back to it's runny state. Sometimes you just need more powdered sugar or less liquid than what the recipe calls for.

carmijok Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 7:35am
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophdobe

Hi~~

Would it be the cream cheese that makes the whole buttercream so liquid? Cuz I find everytime I make cream cheese frosting, they tend to melt away like lava...




You need to have equal amounts of fat to the cream cheese not vice versa--and probably more powdered sugar. I use 8 ounces of butter, 1 8ounce box of cream cheese and 2lbs of powdered sugar.

It won't slide off, but it is not a high heat frosting. That's why i deliver my cakes cold and let them come to room temp gradually. And yes...if it's runny to start with, cooling it will only stop it temporarily.

LilBlackSheep Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 11:44am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophdobe


It was around 97 degrees F and very humid in where I live, so the buttercream was very runny & was hardly able to hold up its shape but it did crust if the layer was thin enough (did not crust on the cake).

Can anyone tell me why the buttercream kept sliding off the cake? and if there is anyway to frost a cake with cream cheese buttercream in hot weather without this kind of disaster happening? Or cream cheese just cannot hold up in hot weathers?




I think the cream cheese is the culprit. Cream cheese and heat don't mix.

denetteb Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 12:16pm
post #7 of

What was the temp in your kitchen when you were making and working with your icing?

Spooky_789 Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 5:26pm
post #8 of

With the heat being at 97 degrees F and a humid day, the butter and the cream cheese would be hard pressed to hold up. Butter melts at 85 degrees F. It begins to soften at a much lower temperature than that. Throw in those high temps and humidity and you saw the result.

Perhaps next time make a high humidity buttercream using a cream cheese or cheesecake flavoring, such as from Loranns.

carmijok Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 7:11pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooky_789

With the heat being at 97 degrees F and a humid day, the butter and the cream cheese would be hard pressed to hold up. Butter melts at 85 degrees F. It begins to soften at a much lower temperature than that. Throw in those high temps and humidity and you saw the result.

Perhaps next time make a high humidity buttercream using a cream cheese or cheesecake flavoring, such as from Loranns.




I use a real butter buttercream and cream cheese frosting on all my cakes...I've not had it slide off. Soften, yes...slide off no. It's also why I deliver my cakes cold--and never to an outside venue in the heat. If you use a pure butter frosting it must be kept cold which allows it to warm to room temp slowly at the venue. And always inside and away from heat sources.

denetteb Posted 11 Jun 2012 , 7:36pm

Something more is wrong if it is sliding off in her own kitchen.

Sophdobe Posted 13 Jun 2012 , 11:23pm

Unfortunately my kitchen is around 90~97 degrees as I have no air con, only have a little fan icon_sad.gif

Can any one share a high humidity buttercream recipe with me? I think humidity is my worst enermy! I've had so many problems caused by it - I think I'll give it another go on a cooler day to see if it is the heat & humidity acting up on me!

Thanks for all the advices icon_smile.gif

icer101 Posted 13 Jun 2012 , 11:51pm

Hi, it is defintely your heat and humidity. I am sure!! Even , the decorators cream cheese recipe would not do in that heat. Sharon Zambit has a buttercream recipe(no cream cheese) on this site and over the internet(she shows how to make it on youtube). She uses hi-ratio shortening. She lives in Louisiana. It is perfect for her climate. Indydebi(member on this site has a recipe also on this site.Decorators on this site love it and say it is their go to buttercream, because it stands up to the heat. You will have to try these, to see if it stands up to the heat and humidity in your home. hth

shannycakers Posted 6 Jul 2012 , 2:05pm

Hi, to the original poster.. I had the same problem last night!! The place where I work is air conditioned, and I tried ednas crusting cream cheese recipe, and i even added way more powedered sugar than called for to make the recipe super stiff, it never worked out. I iced my cake and then it started pulling around the bottom and not staying smooth and straight, I had to take it all off and toss it...

I will never offer brides cream cheese frosting - even the crusting type with high ratio again.. only in the filling. I am not dealing with the stress, its 100 degrees around where i live, and I thought ednas recipe would work for me but if it doesnt even work in my rented cool commercial kitchen then no way will it work later at the venue..

pmarks0 Posted 6 Jul 2012 , 9:58pm

I use a version of IndyDebi's crusting buttercream that MamaWrobin modified to a cream cheese buttercream. It's half way down on the page in this thread http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=685989&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=30

I've made it with the white chocolate as well, which is really good. It is softer when you add the chocolate, so I'd leave that out.

AZCouture Posted 6 Jul 2012 , 10:50pm

It's 90 to 97 degrees in your kitchen? Good Lord I wouldn't expect anything to behave in temperatures like that. icon_sad.gif

BakingIrene Posted 7 Jul 2012 , 3:13am

If the cake had been chilled and then sat in a humid place, it might have developed a film of water that **might** do this.

Otherwise the icing itself is too soft--add 4 pounds of sugar where it calls for 3.5 and also add a packet of Dream Whip (whipped dessert topping dry mix) or one 125 gram packet instant pudding mix. Both of these will absorb water and hold your cream together in high heat/humidity.

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