Does Anyone Use Sugar Veil

Decorating By Seashell48 Updated 14 Aug 2014 , 8:30am by JWinslow

tybaeb3 Posted 13 Aug 2014 , 5:50am
post #31 of 37

AI also struggled at first with Sugar Veil but eventually worked it out and love it . Humidity was my biggest hassle but placing it in an oven with a light fixed the problem. Trust me it's worth the practise

AZCouture Posted 13 Aug 2014 , 6:02am
post #32 of 37

AUsing it right now actually! Hand painting a monarch butterfly pattern on sheets of it to create a dress effect for a tiered cake.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 13 Aug 2014 , 12:34pm
post #33 of 37

I have much better luck with the Sugar Dress brand mix than I do with Sugar Veil...just a personal preference I guess.  I used some lace a week ago that was made on March 15 and it was still just as flexible and usable as it was back then.

JWinslow Posted 13 Aug 2014 , 4:00pm
post #34 of 37

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeff_Arnett 
 

I have much better luck with the Sugar Dress brand mix than I do with Sugar Veil...just a personal preference I guess.  I used some lace a week ago that was made on March 15 and it was still just as flexible and usable as it was back then.

;-D  I know I must be doing something wrong with Sugar Veil - it's always so brittle for me.  I switched to Sugar Dress and I love it, however it never stiffens so if you need your pieces to set up hard, it can be a challenge.

emilyg Posted 13 Aug 2014 , 10:24pm
post #35 of 37

Hi Jeanne - here are a few tips for you. If it's dry where you are (or if you have a furnace or oven or fire going that dries out the air), and you're working for extended periods of time with very delicate SugarVeil decorations, roll up a few wet towels and place around the immediate border of your work area. I use a dish 'pad' (one that you place on the countertop to absorb the water from freshly washed dishes) directly under my silicone mat work area - like this: 

*

It greatly increases the humidity and gives you unlimited time to work very intricately.

Some bakers routinely allow their SugarVeil decorations to dry completely, then rehydrate them when they're ready to use them by passing the decorations thru a steam path, or placing them on a damp kitchen towel. SugarVeil returns to its original flexibility, as shown here:

AppleMark

 

AppleMark

 

The capability of SugarVeil being flexible with the added ability to dry completely is really desirable - that's what makes SugarVeil brooches possible, and also puts some nice body into bows, ribbons, ruffles, and other fabric-like decorations. And on top of that, we're doing some pretty exciting new decorating techniques with dried SugarVeil (here we're using our new product 'Extra Dark Chocolate SugarVeil') rolled onto modeling chocolate and fondant. Gives some interesting surface design to a would-be plainly covered cake. Here are a just a few examples:

 

 

 

 

Hope this helps you a bit. For the fastest answers to your questions (since we check it several times per day), please pose them on our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/sugarveilicing and we'll get an answer to you asap. Thank you!

DeniseNH Posted 14 Aug 2014 , 2:20am
post #36 of 37

I have that one.  You're going to love it.

JWinslow Posted 14 Aug 2014 , 8:30am
post #37 of 37

Thank you for the tips emilyg   ;-D

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