Fondan Covered Cake T: To Fridge Or Not To Fridge?

Decorating By Elisuhh Updated 6 Jun 2012 , 7:48pm by cai0311

Elisuhh Posted 4 Jun 2012 , 11:52pm
post #1 of 9

Hello! I'm new on this website and this is my first post/comment!

I've read all over the internet to not fridge a fondant covered cake due to condensation. Then i've read some who DO fridge a fondant covered cake and don't experience that. I've got a big quinceñera event coming up where she wants the cake covered in fondant.

I want your input/thoughts/suggestions on whether or not I can or should put a fondant covered cake in the fridge. I use the Duff buttercream fondant.

Thank you all kindly in advance :0)

8 replies
Apti Posted 5 Jun 2012 , 1:09am
post #2 of 9

Bienvenidos! Welcome!

The only reason you should refrigerate a cake is if that cake has perishable ingredients that require refrigeration.

If the cake does NOT have any ingredients that require refrigeration, leave it on the counter. Refrigeration causes the cake to go stale faster than leaving it at room temperature (mid 70's).

Most recommend that you either leave the cake at room temperature or freeze it.

Here is a link regarding freezing a fondant cake. Read the post by Rae of BlakesCakes:
http://cakecentral.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&p=7280353#7280353

srkmilklady Posted 5 Jun 2012 , 4:13am
post #3 of 9

Welcome Elisuhh!
You will find that there is a LOT of discussion in the forums regarding this topic. This is what I posted in another thread....

I refrigerate fondant cakes all the time. Having said that, at different times of the year if it is very humid, there will be condensation appear on the cake when it comes out of the fridge. But left alone and not touched, the condensation will evaporate while the cake sits at room temperature. As has been discussed in other threads in the forums, if you put your cake in a box and wrap it with saran, when you bring the cake out of the fridge, the condensation doesn't hit the cake...the box will absorb it.

If you read the following thread Rae of Blakescakes also explains how to refrigerate a cake a lot better than I can.

http://cakecentral.com/cake-decorating-ftopict-721168.html

And what Apti says is right...if you don't have a perishable filling, then you really don't need to refrigerate the cake.

Hope this helps... icon_smile.gif

scp1127 Posted 5 Jun 2012 , 5:51am
post #4 of 9

Everyone covered the high points already. My only addition is that I much prefer to transport a cold cake vs a warm one. Plus if a client is transporting. That extra insurance that the cold cake gives may help avoid an accident.

Elisuhh Posted 5 Jun 2012 , 6:48pm
post #5 of 9

Thanks everyone! I got SO lost on the website I barely figured out how to get back to see the post I made hoping I saw some feedback!! Thank you everyone :0)

Apti - I saw the link you posted from Blakes Cakes, I think I'm going to make a practice cake. A small 6 inch, I'll cover and decorate it and follow instructions and see what happens.

Thanks again for your help icon_smile.gif

Apti Posted 5 Jun 2012 , 9:47pm
post #6 of 9

On behalf of the members who responded: You are welcome!

cai0311 Posted 6 Jun 2012 , 3:31am
post #7 of 9

I put all my cakes in the refrigerator - covered in fondant or not. I do not put the cake in a box or any type of wrap. I just set the whole thing in the fridge and walk away. The cake in my photos with the teddy bears was covered in fondant. It sat in my fridge all night long before delivered to the baby shower. No problems at all (I know because I was guest at the shower and cut and served the cake).

I use fondarific brand fondant.

Elisuhh Posted 6 Jun 2012 , 3:20pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by cai0311

I put all my cakes in the refrigerator - covered in fondant or not. I do not put the cake in a box or any type of wrap. I just set the whole thing in the fridge and walk away. The cake in my photos with the teddy bears was covered in fondant. It sat in my fridge all night long before delivered to the baby shower. No problems at all (I know because I was guest at the shower and cut and served the cake).

I use fondarific brand fondant.





I've heard Satin Ice and Fondarific are great brands. My Michaels has their wilton brand (definite no-no) and Duff buttercream fondant. I've had great compliments on the Duff one. I guess i'll try to order online and see the difference icon_smile.gif Thanks a bunch!

cai0311 Posted 6 Jun 2012 , 7:48pm
post #9 of 9

I hate satin ice fondant. It dries really fast, tears easy and I think it smells and tastes as bad as wilton.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%